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  #16   ^
Old Tue, Jan-28-20, 12:13
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 12,840
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/123/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 139%
Location: USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
Related anecdotes from the Fathead blog of Tom Naughton:

https://www.fathead-movie.com/index...t-free-edition/


That was quite enjoyable! Thanks.
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  #17   ^
Old Wed, Jan-29-20, 19:27
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,520
 
Plan: Dr. Bernstein
Stats: 188/150/135 Female 5 ft 4 inches
BF:
Progress: 72%
Location: NE WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doreen T
Human composting has already been legalized in Washington state, and is currently under consideration in other jurisdictions across US and Canada, including BC. The process differs from "green burial" where the non-embalmed body is buried au naturel in a permanent plot. What can and can't be done with composted human remains falls under the same laws and regulation as cremated remains .. possibly even stricter. Read more here .. A green death: Is human composting or natural burial for you?.

No convoys of trucks laden with human corpses to be made into Soylent Green .. or food fertilizer That is vegan propaganda at its worst, IMO . If vegans are worried about their food being grown in animal remains, it's already being done .. not just manure, but also composted livestock (intentional) and decomposed wildlife (accidental) that are hacked and chopped to bits by machinery during tillage, planting and harvesting processes. But to suggest human remains will be used in commercial agriculture is science fiction at best, and scare-mongering at worst.



Thank you, Doreen. People see the word "compost" & immediately think the human remains are going in the garden. It was an unfortunate word choice. I'm still trying to convince my husband that so-called composting of bodies is a good thing.
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  #18   ^
Old Thu, Jan-30-20, 09:20
Bob-a-rama's Avatar
Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,581
 
Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
Stats: 230/171/185 Male 5' 11"
BF:
Progress: 131%
Location: Florida
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We have to call their bluff, and spread the word, before the demand for meat gets so low that they plow up the pastures to grow corn and soy.

7 Nutrients you can't get from plants:

https://www.healthline.com/nutritio...9-11-07&apid=#1
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  #19   ^
Old Fri, Feb-28-20, 04:57
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 22,977
 
Plan: Keto/IF
Stats: 217/191/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 46%
Location: UK
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An interesting piece by Zoe Harcombe calling out the blatant vegan/vegetarian propaganda in a mainstream UK TV programme:


Trust Me Iím a Doctor Ė Donít!

https://www.zoeharcombe.com/2020/02...-a-doctor-dont/
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  #20   ^
Old Fri, Feb-28-20, 07:54
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 1,424
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Demi
An interesting piece by Zoe Harcombe calling out the blatant vegan/vegetarian propaganda in a mainstream UK TV programme:


Trust Me Iím a Doctor Ė Donít!

https://www.zoeharcombe.com/2020/02...-a-doctor-dont/



Something I didn't realize until my PhD daughter told me just a couple of months ago: I was already aware that a medical degree with a license to practice medicine is NOT the same as a doctorate degree, but I didn't realize that PhDs (philosophical doctors) are the original ones to earn the title "Doctor". I don't know the history behind how it happened, but she said that the term doctor in reference to a medical degree is only a courtesy title, not a mark of anything remotely like what it takes to earn a PhD.

[I should mention that she earned her PhD in the UK, so I base my description on what she went through - some of the terminology I use, and some of the steps involved may be slightly different in the US, or other countries, depending on what that country's PhD process requires.]

The PhD candidate is required to spend years doing their own research into a specific aspect of their subject matter (the topic itself being specific enough that it is different in some way from every other accepted PhD thesis), write a well documented thesis, then defend their research and conclusions in front of a panel of PhDs experienced in that general topic. Their thesis will be judged not only on the quality and completeness of their research, but also on how well they are able to defend their work - and most importantly, on how thoroughly their research supports their conclusion. Personal bias on a topic has no place in the work of a PhD thesis - it is to be based purely on research, so if you really don't like the conclusions your research proves, probably best to switch to a different topic, because there's no way you can adequately defend conclusions that are not supported by thorough research. If the thesis is deemed acceptable, it may or may not require some minor revisions, or it may require major revisions before being fully accepted. If the thesis is not acceptable because the research is inadequate, or the conclusions are not fully supported by the research, or the entire work can not be properly defended, the PhD candidate will be told to start over. Once a fully acceptable thesis is submitted, properly defended, and fully accepted, it will then be printed and held in the British Library. (the equivalent in the US would be the Library of Congress)

This is vastly different from how a medical degree is obtained. In order to become a medical doctor, they basically do a few extra years of schooling, doing the exact same thing as we all did in school - memorize a bunch of information well enough to recall information as required. Considering that a medical degree is considered to be a scientific degree, it's a travesty that they aren't required to do any more than memorize a bunch of already accepted "medical facts", and as someone pointed out, even if you're doing "scientific research", if your science experiment doesn't show the expected results, then it's automatically assumed that you did something wrong during the experiment. [Which is the exact opposite of what I was taught in 7th grade science - your experiment results are what they are. It doesn't matter if your results conform to the expected results - you record exactly what happened when YOU performed the experiment.] For all intents and purposes, the job of a physician just involves regurgitating the currently recommended drugs, procedures, and diet to every patient who comes their way. (This might be a good time to mention that for hundreds of years, balancing "humors" by bleeding patients - even those who had an injury that resulted in massive blood loss -was the medical treatment of choice for all ills) Even the so called peer-reviewed research and articles that are published in medical journals are not scrutinized nearly as thoroughly as a PhD thesis will be, because their conclusions can and often are accepted, even when they're in direct opposition to what their research proved.

Ironically, most PhDs are not awarded in subject areas that have anything to do with health - there's history, language, Literature, media, communications, mathematics, and many more non-health related PhD areas, even though their research and conclusions have nothing to do with the health and well being of millions of people. But just think if our health research related scientists actually did research the same way that a PhD candidate is required to research, write, and defend their thesis - we might actually have properly conducted research, with honest conclusions, resulting in truly sound advice regarding diet, medications, and procedures.
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  #21   ^
Old Fri, Feb-28-20, 08:00
bkloots's Avatar
bkloots bkloots is offline
Posts: 9,804
 
Plan: Atkins/LCHF/Keto
Stats: 195/158/150 Female 63in
BF:
Progress: 82%
Location: Kansas City, MO
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Human compost? Not a new idea.

In a Chicago Natural History museum featuring an extensive display of ancient Egyptian artifacts, I learned that British "entrepreneurs" in the 19th century exhumed tons (tonnes) of mummies, ground them to powder, and shipped them home as garden fertilizer. As mummification was a preservation method not only for royals, but also for ordinary workers, cats, and birds, it was an organic gold mine.

I wrote a poem about this called "Of Mums and Mummies," which is included in one of my collections. Indeed, I have made arrangements for my "cremains" to be placed directly in the ground at my church, along with those of my parents and my first husband and other responsible citizens. Every spring, when the daffodils and dogwoods bloom there, I look forward to my forever future.
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  #22   ^
Old Mon, Mar-30-20, 10:30
GalmOne GalmOne is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 3
 
Plan: here to find
Stats: 221/221/200 Male 183 cm
BF:
Progress:
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob-a-rama
As long as you don't eat corn-fed beef, you are doing the planet a favor by eating it.

The cows fertilize the grasslands they graze on and nothing else is needed other than what mother nature provides. As long as the greedy ranchers are not overgrazing, it takes care of itself.

To grow veggies on relatively sterile grasslands requires tons of water and fertilizer.

Bob


Still, the info's distorted and misused by vegans, but beef consumption consumes quite a lot of water.
The solution, however, isn't to stop eating meat, but to eat a little less beef and more chicken. On top of that, it's high time we start producing and eating more goat meat, which tastes great - like a leaner mutton - and is economical in terms of used water and surface.
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  #23   ^
Old Mon, Mar-30-20, 11:07
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,426
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GalmOne
Still, the info's distorted and misused by vegans, but beef consumption consumes quite a lot of water.
The solution, however, isn't to stop eating meat, but to eat a little less beef and more chicken. On top of that, it's high time we start producing and eating more goat meat, which tastes great - like a leaner mutton - and is economical in terms of used water and surface.

And leaner is better???
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  #24   ^
Old Mon, Mar-30-20, 19:18
Bob-a-rama's Avatar
Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,581
 
Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
Stats: 230/171/185 Male 5' 11"
BF:
Progress: 131%
Location: Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GalmOne
Still, the info's distorted and misused by vegans, but beef consumption consumes quite a lot of water.
The solution, however, isn't to stop eating meat, but to eat a little less beef and more chicken. On top of that, it's high time we start producing and eating more goat meat, which tastes great - like a leaner mutton - and is economical in terms of used water and surface.

Grass fed beef requires much less water than growing veggies on a prairie.

Bob
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  #25   ^
Old Tue, Mar-31-20, 05:43
bkloots's Avatar
bkloots bkloots is offline
Posts: 9,804
 
Plan: Atkins/LCHF/Keto
Stats: 195/158/150 Female 63in
BF:
Progress: 82%
Location: Kansas City, MO
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Quote:
Grass fed beef requires much less water than growing veggies on a prairie.
I've never really understood the significance of this data about water consumption and beef production--which is repeated every single time there's an article about avoiding red meat.

I get that meat-producing factory farms--whether for beef, pork, chicken, or fish--are bad for animals and bad for people. Can we fix that without eliminating the protein source that's still vital for health? A problem not solved yet.
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  #26   ^
Old Tue, Mar-31-20, 05:59
Benay's Avatar
Benay Benay is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 642
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 200/174.5/175 Female 5 feet 6 inches
BF:
Progress: 102%
Location: Prescott, Arizona, USA
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I have friends who have searched for a goat to BBQ or even goat meat

Good luck
For some reason Westerners prefer sheep to goat
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  #27   ^
Old Tue, Mar-31-20, 08:59
Bob-a-rama's Avatar
Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,581
 
Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
Stats: 230/171/185 Male 5' 11"
BF:
Progress: 131%
Location: Florida
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bkloots
I've never really understood the significance of this data about water consumption and beef production--which is repeated every single time there's an article about avoiding red meat.

I get that meat-producing factory farms--whether for beef, pork, chicken, or fish--are bad for animals and bad for people. Can we fix that without eliminating the protein source that's still vital for health? A problem not solved yet.

There is a lot of prairie in Florida, and a very ecological rancher with mega-thousands of acres. He doesn't water his beef. There are streams where they drink naturally.

The steer grow on nothing other than what mother nature provides. He checks their health, if sick is isolates the sick one immediately (no herd immunity for him), moves them from pasture to pasture to keep them from overgrazing, and has books of all the other wildlife that share his ranches, wild turkeys, cranes, opossums, bobcats, and so on.

If you eat 100% grass-fed, pasture raised beef, you are doing the planet a favor. Plowing that up for veggies would use mega-amounts water, pesticides, herbicides and fertilizer (the manufacture of which puts 100 times more methane into the atmosphere than all the cow burps and farts combined).

Bob
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  #28   ^
Old Tue, Mar-31-20, 09:40
deirdra's Avatar
deirdra deirdra is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,087
 
Plan: HF/vLC/GF,CF,SF
Stats: 197/136/150 Female 66 inches
BF:
Progress: 130%
Location: Alberta
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Grass-fed steer also protect the soil from erosion and water loss, which is a problem in fields tilled to grow crops - high winds blow away the dry soil.
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