Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low-Carb Studies & Research / Media Watch > LC Research/Media
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Tue, Oct-01-19, 01:17
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 22,473
 
Plan: LCHF/IF
Stats: 217/182/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 61%
Location: UK
Default Six Reasons to Go Paleo for Mental Health

Six Reasons to Go Paleo for Mental Health

How uncivilizing your diet can make for a happier, healthier brain.

Georgia Ede MD


https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/...o-mental-health

Quote:
If you are living with a mental health problem of any kind, there are many dietary strategies you can use to try to address the root causes of your symptoms, and the so-called paleo diet is an excellent place to start for just about everyone.

While definitions can vary, I define a paleo diet as a pre-agricultural whole foods diet. Pre-agricultural because it excludes the grains, legumes and dairy products that only became staple foods in most cultures after the birth of agriculture, and whole foods because it excludes the dizzying array of modern processed “foods” which began flooding our markets with the industrialization of our food supply in the mid-20th Century. A paleo-style diet consists therefore of meat, seafood, and/or poultry, fruits and vegetables, nuts and edible seeds, and may also include eggs.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Tue, Oct-01-19, 07:06
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 12,135
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Imo, the foods are best eaten with clean sauces, herbs, etc. Minimize AS, bottled concoctions, etc.

Means learning basic cooking skills.
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Tue, Oct-01-19, 13:43
JLx's Avatar
JLx JLx is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,212
 
Plan: Eat less, less often
Stats: 235/210/191 Female 66
BF:Hi wt: 276,255,235
Progress: 57%
Location: Michigan U.P., USA
Default

Ancient Oat Discovery May Poke More Holes in Paleo Diet https://www.nationalgeographic.com/...-in-paleo-diet/

Quote:
Our Stone-Age ancestors didn’t gorge themselves on grains and other starchy fare, the thinking goes, and neither should we.

But now evidence has emerged that people enjoyed their carbs even during the Paleolithic era, a period also known as the Old Stone Age that stretched from roughly 2.5 million to 12,000 years ago. A new analysis of a Paleolithic pestle shows it was dusted with oat starch, suggesting that ancient humans were grinding oats into flour and, presumably, dining on oatcakes or some other oat-based delicacy. ...

Scientists still debate what exactly our forebears ate and in what proportion, but a growing number of archaeological finds show that ancient people ate just about everything–including the high-starch foods forbidden by more stringent Paleo diets. ...

Survival may have hinged on oats some 33,000 years ago at the Italian cave called Grotta Paglicci. Inside the cave, archaeologists have uncovered paintings and what must have been a cherished tool: a sandstone pestle about 5 inches (11.8 cm) long. Analysis reveals the pestle was studded with starch granules from a cornucopia of plant materials, including grasses similar to millet and what might be acorns, the researchers report in this week’s Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. But the most common starch was from oats. ...

The pestle provides the oldest evidence for human oat consumption, adding to other evidence that “people were using grasses much earlier than we thought and in larger quantities than we thought, at some times of year,” Barton says. Pre-agricultural people also carbo-loaded on the tubers of the purple nut sedge, a noxious weed; underground stems of the cattail, which may have been ground into flour; and the seeds of wild wheat. ...

Stone-Age humans weren’t shoveling in large amounts of grain. But researchers generally agree that there was no single Paleolithic diet. Before farming began about 12,000 years ago, the human diet was absurdly, wildly variable, and fluid. How people fended off hunger depended on where they lived, the season of year, weather, and countless other factors. ...

For many Paleolithic people, the bottom of the food pyramid wasn’t red meat but plant food, such as tubers or starchy plant stems, says paleobiologist Amanda Henry of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. The relatively complex recipe used to prepare oats at Grotta Paglicci shows they were an important food to the people there, archaeologist Anna Revedin of the Italian Institute of Prehistory and Early History, a co-author of the oat study, says via email. Humans also ate snails, worms, grubs—“all kinds of little things that we would never think about now … would have been consumed on a daily basis,” Barton says.

Even some Paleo advocates don’t necessarily disagree. “The current food supply can’t hold a candle to Paleolithic man’s diet in terms of diversity,” Sarah Ballantyne, who blogs as The Paleo Mom, says via email. For her, Paleo diets are about improving nutrition, not about slavishly emulating the caveman’s eating habits.


Dr. Ede once described an onion as a "fruit wearing a vegetable suit" which is just ridiculous, imo, and the kind of thing that turns ordinary people completely off the idea of a low carb diet, which yes, I believe would help many people with mental illness. The question is "low carb/paleo" to what degree? Research is just trickling in about the microbiome and the brain/mental health connection. Is some amount of starch (as per Paul Jaminet) optimal? Or how about resistant starch?

My experience is that I feel pretty crappy (more depressed, insomniac) on a very low carb diet but I feel even worse on the SAD.
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Tue, Oct-01-19, 14:36
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 12,135
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Well it would be farsical to think that 10,000 years ago farming was an instantaneous success across the world.

Agriculture EVOLVED . Developing tools, planting techniques, storage of seed, selection and development of larger seeds, or larger roots. Takes generations.

Think about a carrot. Pull up Queen's Ann Lace and bite the root. Its a long 3-4 inch pencil lead thick orangy root. It is a wild carrot. A far cry fron the modern varieies that can weigh nearly a pound.

Somehow science, or is it people, requires absolutes. Concrete dates cannot be rigid because of an evolutionary process. For general purposes, dividing evolution into neat pockets makes learning and understanding history easier. Absolutes cannot be literally applied to agricutural development. Hence, 10,000 years ago was a noteable change to adding the "culture "of plants for our human use in a significant way. In the years prior, it was developing. Just as hunting and gathering continued on , side by side agriculture,, until modern times when it has nearly petered out.

Last edited by Ms Arielle : Tue, Oct-01-19 at 14:41.
Reply With Quote
  #5   ^
Old Tue, Oct-01-19, 14:42
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is online now
Posts: 3,107
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

We all have diverse requirements of an optimal diet based on many factors. For those human tribes spanning the globe during the Paleolithic period, there certainly had to be diversity based on the foods available in the various regions where people lived. Certainly, there were fruits, vegetables, and wild grains consumed in certain seasons. As for those who question diet diversity, I have one question: What is a Mediterranean diet?
Reply With Quote
  #6   ^
Old Tue, Oct-01-19, 14:59
JLx's Avatar
JLx JLx is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,212
 
Plan: Eat less, less often
Stats: 235/210/191 Female 66
BF:Hi wt: 276,255,235
Progress: 57%
Location: Michigan U.P., USA
Default

I didn't know that about Queen Anne's lace! We have a lot of it growing around here. Can you eat it?

When Tim Steele had a blog (other than his potato diet book blog) he convinced me that "paleo" wasn't as cut and dried as it's presented by some. I recall him talking about cattail tubers, tiger nuts, and honey among other things. It makes sense that people would have eaten whatever looked edible to them, finding out the hard way with certain foods such as mushrooms, when they made a mistake.

I can't find the exact article now that I read but it was about these "baby bottles" https://www.dw.com/en/scientists-un...many/a-50587532. The archeologist noted that despite them having been found periodically for years, no one figured out what they were used for until women scientists got involved. When they made replicas, they tried them out on babies, and sure enough they fit their hands perfectly and functioned well.
Reply With Quote
  #7   ^
Old Tue, Oct-01-19, 15:10
Zei Zei is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,457
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
BF:
Progress: 34%
Location: Texas
Default

I'm pretty sure no one way back in time skipped any available food source they could discover to stay alive. Ancient diets high or low in carbs, fat, etc. We hear about traditional, for example Asian, diets with a lot of carbs and old-time people not becoming metabolically deranged eating them. But add sugar and processed junk to those diets and boom! Epidemic of diabetes and the like. Like many I was well-meaningly raised on foods I still recognize as healthy but also a lot of sugar and other refined carbs, trans fats and all that processed stuff people had no clue at the time were so bad for all of us. Without all that exposure to sugar etc. might I have been able to consume a high starch diet today while remaining metabolically healthy? Maybe. But can I now? No. A whole foods paleo diet is far too much carbohydrate, as are many keto plans. Regardless of what ancient people were able to eat, each of us has to figure out, with our own unique bodies and past metabolic assaults, what we can each handle now.
Reply With Quote
  #8   ^
Old Tue, Oct-01-19, 15:24
Little Me's Avatar
Little Me Little Me is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,084
 
Plan: LC/GF
Stats: 208/170/168 Female 5'3
BF:
Progress: 95%
Location: SoCal
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
...one question: What is a Mediterranean diet?

Hah! Great question! You’ve got Italy, France, Spain, etc...all very different cuisines. Much tastier than SAD, too.
Reply With Quote
  #9   ^
Old Tue, Oct-01-19, 18:27
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 12,135
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

JL, I know a woman that subsisted on what nature and a gun provided. It was not by choice but necessity. Her mom could field dress a deer in record time. She no longer needs to aquire food that wsy, she says its hard work. She lives in the Virginia area.

Edible foods are passed down generation to generation. Look at what animals will eat for clues as well.

Use reliable sources to learn what is edible.
Reply With Quote
  #10   ^
Old Tue, Oct-01-19, 18:44
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
Posts: 11,253
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 44%
Location: Texas
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
JL, I know a woman that subsisted on what nature and a gun provided. It was not by choice but necessity. Her mom could field dress a deer in record time. She no longer needs to aquire food that wsy, she says its hard work. She lives in the Virginia area.

Edible foods are passed down generation to generation. Look at what animals will eat for clues as well.

Use reliable sources to learn what is edible.


Funny because city people don't even realize that country people are still hunting a lot of their food..
Reply With Quote
  #11   ^
Old Tue, Oct-01-19, 19:11
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 12,135
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 255/214/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 40%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

nope. My mother lives on a big island. the joke is tge backside deer population is regularly thinned. The otherside gets their shrubbery and gardens thinned by overpopulation.
Reply With Quote
  #12   ^
Old Tue, Oct-01-19, 20:40
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
Posts: 11,253
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 44%
Location: Texas
Default

The wild hogs will just mix with our herd while grazing. They are so destructive they'll dig up a pasture to the point that you can't drive over the area much less do anything else with it so needless to say they have to be eradicated because they multiply like rabbits and they have huge tusks. Usually we will call a neighbor because they know how to butcher them, we don't. They keep the meat for area volunteer firefighter fundraisers.
Reply With Quote
  #13   ^
Old Tue, Oct-01-19, 21:50
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,274
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Meme#1
Funny because city people don't even realize that country people are still hunting a lot of their food..



A lot of the big city types will pretend to hunt - by that, I mean that they'll book a hunting party at a farm with a hunting lodge (the farm next to my brother's is one place like that). The owner of the hunting lodge farm will set out piles of corn near the deer blinds to attract the deer during hunting season - all the city-slicker hunters need to do is sit back and wait for the deer to show up, then the entire hunting party can shoot at once.



As soon as the first shot is fired, any deer not hit will be terrified and scatter to the wooded areas on nearby farms to hide. My brother (and other local farmers) will do real hunting, but that's made so much more difficult by the fact that the deer are so terrified that they're hiding in whatever brush there is in the wooded areas. Before long, they're hungry and heading back to where they know there's plenty to eat though, only to be shot at and scared away again. Rinse and repeat during the entire hunting season.



There's not enough deer overall removed by the hunting parties to protect the crops - but the way the hunting parties are conducted also makes it much more difficult for other farmers to remove enough to thin the herds to any worthwhile degree.



The saddest part about this is that since the city slicker hunters aren't hunting for much needed food, they're partying the entire time - sitting around and drinking beer until everyone in their party has finally bagged a deer, even if it takes all day. Meanwhile, the deer they killed is sitting around in the back of a pickup truck all that time. It's hours and hours before they ever take that deer to be properly chilled and processed (the city slickers certainly don't know how to butcher it themselves). This is why venison so often tastes "gamey" - it's not that it's a wild animal, it's that it's been allowed to sit around without proper chilling for far too long, and it's half spoiled by the time it's processed.



DB knows better - when he can manage to get a deer, he immediately takes it to be processed, and that meat is VERY GOOD.
Reply With Quote
  #14   ^
Old Tue, Oct-01-19, 22:07
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
Posts: 11,253
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/188/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 44%
Location: Texas
Default

Do they at least field dress it? I hope....
Many places here won't process anything with hair, it has to be at least partially butchered/skinned.
Reply With Quote
  #15   ^
Old Wed, Oct-02-19, 06:38
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,274
 
Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
BF:
Progress: 50%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Meme#1
Do they at least field dress it? I hope....
Many places here won't process anything with hair, it has to be at least partially butchered/skinned.



As far as I know, they gut it before tossing it in the back of their pickup, since that would eliminate a fair amount of weight to lift into the truck, but I couldn't guarantee they actually do that either. Pretty sure that the local processors don't require that the animal be skinned first though.



It's never good when something vital to sound ecological wildlife management is turned into a business. DB has allowed trusted friends to hunt on his farm for decades, but it's just been an exercise in frustration since the guy with the hunting party lodge started that business.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 17:41.


Copyright © 2000-2019 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.