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  #1   ^
Old Sun, Oct-27-19, 07:38
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default BBC showed blatant bias on diet, complain angry vegans

BBC showed blatant bias on diet, complain angry vegans

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/20...n-angry-vegans/

Quote:
The BBC has been accused by vegans of failing to challenge “fatuous propaganda” from an author whom they claim misrepresented plant-based diets on air.

The broadcaster was hit by a barrage of complaints after Kirsty Wark interviewed Joanna Blythman, a food writer, on Radio 4’s Start the Week programme on Monday.

She made claims including that a vegan diet “cannot compare in nutrient density” to a meat-based diet and vegans would have to take supplements to get enough vitamins.

Furious listeners accused Ms Wark of lacking impartiality in her handling of the issue, while others suggested the BBC had given airtime to “fatuous propaganda on behalf of the meat industry”.

The presenter attracted further ire by suggesting in her opening to the programme that veganism was a “fad”.

One listener, Theresa, from London, said in a complaint read out on the station’s Feedback programme: “To hear the presenter Kirsty Wark say without challenge that eating 14-year-old beef will do now harm - implying to the environment, maybe even the animal - is ridiculous and offensive.”

It was claimed the programme traced veganism back to a religious group “obsessed with masturbation”, which Theresa said was a “gross misrepresentation” of the movement.

According to another complaint, Ms Blythman was allowed to talk “absolute rubbish” without anyone “daring to contradict her”.

The interview caused such consternation that Viva, the vegan campaign group, published an 800-word rebuttal to what it described as “blatant misinformation and biased reporting from the BBC”.

“The presenters managed to make wild, unsubstantiated claims on all aspects of veganism - from the environment to nutrition, and even human rights and culture,” the response said.

“How ironic to state that ‘there is a plethora of information out there yet very little of it is authenticated’ when the BBC themselves are sharing misinformation and presenting it as fact.”

Tim Lang, professor of food policy at City, University of London, told Feedback Ms Blythman’s claims about supplements were “not necessarily true at all” and Ms Wark’s reference to veganism as a “fad” was “a bit demeaning”.

However, he said in defence of the broadcaster: “(Ms Wark) is a very experienced presenter.

“Start the Week is a programme which is discussing and representing particular books so I think it is an occasion when book writers can have their say.”

He added that research would go on to “undoubtedly show difficulties and advantages in all sorts of diet”.
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  #2   ^
Old Sun, Oct-27-19, 10:26
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Calianna Calianna is online now
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When the vegans have been 100% vegan for 50 years, with absolutely no dietary supplements, and are still in perfect health, then I'll believe it's a truly sustainable, healthy diet. Actually a couple years of eating 100% vegan (with absolutely no supplementation of any kind) should be more than enough to prove a vegan diet is nutritionally inadequate, and in fact dangerous in the long run.

One thing I often see vegans and vegetarians claiming is that pound for pound (or ounce for ounce, gram for gram etc), spinach has as much protein as meat, but according to every nutrition panel I've ever seen for spinach compared to meat, spinach doesn't even come close.

This is from the nutrition facts app on my phone:

100 g raw spinach: 2.2 g protein
100 g raw 70% lean ground beef:14.35 g protein

I purposely compared their ultimate spinach to non-organic, relatively high fat ground beef, because I knew the lower fat ground beef, roasts, and steaks would have even more protein. So even comparing spinach to low quality, higher fat ground beef, you still get more protein from the ground beef.

I don't know where vegans get their nutrition information, but I don't believe they've bothered to actually research nutrition stats, and are instead just following whatever their gurus tell them.
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  #3   ^
Old Tue, Nov-05-19, 16:51
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Quote:
One listener, Theresa, from London, said in a complaint read out on the station’s Feedback programme: “To hear the presenter Kirsty Wark say without challenge that eating 14-year-old beef will do now harm - implying to the environment, maybe even the animal - is ridiculous and offensive.”


What? 14-year-old beef? Did she mean months, not years?
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  #4   ^
Old Wed, Nov-06-19, 07:16
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Calianna Calianna is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie OFS
What? 14-year-old beef? Did she mean months, not years?



I had to google for 14 year old beef, and it seems that the older the cattle when taken to slaughter, the more tender and flavorful the beef will be, because the older they are, the more fat they'll have, and the more complex the flavors of the beef will become.



Some sites mentioned the desirability of steaks from cattle as old as 15 years, although the natural lifespan of cattle can be as much as 20 years. Even though most beef cattle in this country are taken to market at about 18 months, there's one breed of cattle in Spain which is at least 8 years old before slaughter.
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  #5   ^
Old Wed, Nov-06-19, 08:50
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
I had to google for 14 year old beef, and it seems that the older the cattle when taken to slaughter, the more tender and flavorful the beef will be, because the older they are, the more fat they'll have, and the more complex the flavors of the beef will become.


Gourmet for the keto/humane win.
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  #6   ^
Old Wed, Nov-06-19, 09:45
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
I had to google for 14 year old beef, and it seems that the older the cattle when taken to slaughter, the more tender and flavorful the beef will be, because the older they are, the more fat they'll have, and the more complex the flavors of the beef will become.


Wow - never heard that before. It sure doesn't work that way with smaller animals. Chickens become tougher with age & not very tasty. Not sure about rabbits - n ever had reason to eat a rabbit that was more than a couple years old.
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  #7   ^
Old Wed, Nov-06-19, 09:54
Verbena Verbena is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie OFS
Wow - never heard that before. It sure doesn't work that way with smaller animals. Chickens become tougher with age & not very tasty. Not sure about rabbits - n ever had reason to eat a rabbit that was more than a couple years old.


I never heard that about beef either; interesting.
I agree about the toughness of older chickens, but would argue about the "not very tasty". Older"stewing hens", need to be cooked differently (stewed), but they make the best soups and stews. Younger birds haven't had much time to develop flavor, but conversely have also not had time to toughen up. Don't find too many stewing hens anymore.
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  #8   ^
Old Wed, Nov-06-19, 10:23
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
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My older sheep are not tender and do not get top price. Old rams are sold as stew meat for the maritime shippers.

Perhaps there is a misunderstanding. Aged meats hung to age in controlled environments do get tender.... perhaps years was meant to be months....

My sheep graze over land that is not tillable, they turn weeds into meat.

Vegans are misguided. Imho a vegan life style historically develops due to lack of options. To choose vegan is odd. Getting the right amount of each amino acid from a vegetarian source is tricky business. I made rice and beans for my boys last night. That is a good combo. We are designed to eat a variety of food sources. To adapt to what is available.

I am concerned that in South America forests are cut down to make pastureland. This is not a good practice and programs are in place to stop the cutting. However it is not enough to stop all the destruction.

In the US the huge plains area once used by the buffalo is perfect for grazing. We should be demanding 10O% grass fed meats from cattle and sheep, and chickens, ducks and turkeys should also be on grasslands.

And much of Africa is the same structure, natural grasslands to browse. Again programs are getting support to rebuild the natural grazing that the wild grasses need to survive. If left ungrazed the native grasses mature and die off leaving the soils to erode in the rainy season. When rotational grazing brought in, those grasses remain lush and regrow waiting for herbivores to come back to mow the grasses again and again. When the rainy season arrives the roots hold the soils in place AND alliws that soil to absorb the rains, keeping the ground moist as the rains have not drained away to a river.

IMHO a tree, a carrot, a peach is valuable. As important as a squirrel, a mouse, a lamb, a steer. The circle of life.
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  #9   ^
Old Wed, Nov-06-19, 10:39
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verbena
I never heard that about beef either; interesting.
I agree about the toughness of older chickens, but would argue about the "not very tasty". Older"stewing hens", need to be cooked differently (stewed), but they make the best soups and stews. Younger birds haven't had much time to develop flavor, but conversely have also not had time to toughen up. Don't find too many stewing hens anymore.


I had only 1 experience with an old rooster & I didn't know how old he was. He just showed up one day. I would have kept him but had no way to protect him from the hens, who didn't like him - they kept beating him up. So I figured it was time for him to go. He was so tough & nasty tasting that he ended up being cat food. At least he had some use in the end!
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  #10   ^
Old Wed, Nov-06-19, 14:47
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Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Angry vegans are angry because they are half starved to death!
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  #11   ^
Old Wed, Nov-06-19, 14:52
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Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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The price of cattle for anyone who wants to know is about $1.60 per pound for an 8 month old calf. The price for an tough old cow is about 40-60 cents per pound at auction... The price will be higher or lower depending on the condition of the cow.

Last edited by Meme#1 : Wed, Nov-06-19 at 15:04.
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  #12   ^
Old Wed, Nov-06-19, 18:18
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Calianna Calianna is online now
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Concerning the old cattle - there were a couple places google brought up that said older beef was more flavorful. Of course it needs to be aged properly too. Here's the article from a restaurant in Hong Kong that serves the Galician beef.



They mentioned that it wasn't the most tender beef, but apparently they think the flavor far outweighs the less tender aspect, since they didn't make it sound like it was incredibly tough either, just not as tender as some beef.
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