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  #1   ^
Old Tue, Aug-06-13, 06:55
Judynyc's Avatar
Judynyc Judynyc is offline
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Default Childhood Abuse & Later Thyroid Problems for Women

Childhood Abuse & Later Thyroid Problems for Women

Stress hormone in 'fight-or-flight' reaction may be involved, researcher suggests.

http://www.webmd.com/news/20130802/...?src=RSS_PUBLIC

FRIDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Women who suffered physical abuse during childhood are at increased risk for thyroid problems, according to a new study.

"We found a significant association with thyroid disorders for women who were abused during childhood," lead author Esme Fuller Thomson, professor and chair at the University of Toronto's Faculty of Social Work, said in a university news release.

"We originally thought the link would be explained by factors such as daily stress, smoking or alcohol abuse -- characteristics associated with both childhood physical abuse and thyroid disorders -- but even after adjusting for 14 potential explanatory factors, women who had been physically abused in childhood had 40 percent higher odds of thyroid disorders than their non-abused peers," Fuller Thomson said.

Researchers analyzed data from about 13,000 Canadian adults. More than 1,000 of the women reported being physically abused before they turned 18 and about 900 said they had been diagnosed with a thyroid disorder.

The study was published online July 29 in the Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma.

Long-term effects of childhood physical abuse on the thyroid "may be due to the way early traumas change the way an individual reacts to stress throughout life," study co-author Loriena Yancura, an associate professor in the family and consumer sciences department at the University of Hawaii, said in the news release.

"One important avenue for future research is to investigate potential dysfunctions in the production of the 'fight-or-flight' hormone, cortisol, among survivors of abuse," she added.
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  #2   ^
Old Tue, Aug-06-13, 07:46
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
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**shrug**

Mine was due to an autoimmune disease. No abuse in my background, thankfully. I kind of roll my eyes when I see observational studies like this. One can probably link all sorts of things to a history of abuse, like more smoking, poor diet, etc. all of which can contribute to developing autoimmune issues.

Last edited by Nancy LC : Tue, Aug-06-13 at 09:00.
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Old Tue, Aug-06-13, 07:53
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Liz53 Liz53 is offline
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While I don't doubt that the stress can affect hormones, I wonder if they are not finding more thyroid problems in part because they are looking for them (when you have a hammer, everything looks like a nail).

I think doctors are so reluctant to diagnose thyroid disease, and here is a study willing to acknowledge it exists. I wonder if they used the same standards to identify thyroid problems as your typical suspicious-of-thyroid-problems GP or perhaps more generous guidelines?

No doubt, though, that childhood abuse and neglect leave their mark for a lifetime in so many ways, leading to increased cortisol - and its effects - where we might not otherwise see it.
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