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  #1   ^
Old Fri, Feb-25-22, 03:49
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default Meat intake is positively correlated with life expectancies

Quote:
Total Meat Intake is Associated with Life Expectancy: A Cross-Sectional Data Analysis of 175 Contemporary Populations

Background: The association between a plant-based diet (vegetarianism) and extended life span is increasingly criticised since it may be based on the lack of representative data and insufficient removal of confounders such as lifestyles.

Aim: We examined the association between meat intake and life expectancy at a population level based on ecological data published by the United Nations agencies.

Methods: Population-specific data were obtained from 175 countries/territories. Scatter plots, bivariate, partial correlation and linear regression models were used with SPSS 25 to explore and compare the correlations between newborn life expectancy (e(0)), life expectancy at 5 years of life (e(5)) and intakes of meat, and carbohydrate crops, respectively.

The established risk factors to life expectancy caloric intake, urbanization, obesity and education levels were included as the potential confounders.

Results: Worldwide, bivariate correlation analyses revealed that meat intake is positively correlated with life expectancies. This relationship remained significant when influences of caloric intake, urbanization, obesity, education and carbohydrate crops were statistically controlled. Stepwise linear regression selected meat intake, not carbohydrate crops, as one of the significant predictors of life expectancy. In contrast, carbohydrate crops showed weak and negative correlation with life expectancy.

Conclusion: If meat intake is not incorporated into nutrition science for predicting human life expectancy, results could prove inaccurate.

https://www.dovepress.com/total-mea...xt-article-IJGM

Click the link above to read the article in full.
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  #2   ^
Old Fri, Feb-25-22, 10:09
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Dodger Dodger is offline
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Plan: Paleoish/Keto
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That paper should have gotten a lot of press coverage. It seems to be ignored by the media.
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  #3   ^
Old Fri, Feb-25-22, 15:29
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Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
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Maybe, but I'd be a bit suspicious that eating more meat is correlated with higher socio-economic circumstances, which is definitely correlated with longer lifespans. That's why wine drinkers seem to be healthier. It isn't because they drink wine, it is because they have enough money to buy wine.
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  #4   ^
Old Wed, Apr-27-22, 09:33
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nancy LC
It isn't because they drink wine, it is because they have enough money to buy wine.


Excellent point. And it's economic circumstances which make the poor wrap what meat they get in bread and batters, serving it on rice and noodles.

They mentioned education level being controlled as a confounder, which sheds some light. And this was quite the diverse study, which takes care of a lot of cofounders all by itself.

If it had been the 22 Countries Study the data would have been more accurate.

Instead of a scam, which is what it was.
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  #5   ^
Old Wed, Apr-27-22, 12:00
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
That paper should have gotten a lot of press coverage. It seems to be ignored by the media.

Exactly, it's not what they want to publish.

Quote:
"Results: Worldwide, bivariate correlation analyses revealed that meat intake is positively correlated with life expectancies. This relationship remained significant when influences of caloric intake, urbanization, obesity, education and carbohydrate crops were statistically controlled."

From an epidemiological cross-sectional data analysis where only associations can be observed. See the above quote's bold section. It's not productive to presume any further conclusions. The refreshing part is the observation that meat is often ignored or lumped with subjects eating other foods considered unhealthy, thereby resulting in biased findings with meat as a usual contributing suspect. No more, no less.
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  #6   ^
Old Thu, Apr-28-22, 04:42
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
Exactly, it's not what they want to publish.


Excellent point about correlation bias.

Still, to me, the starkest indicator of meat's importance is how societies without access will resort to war and even cannibalism to obtain it.

If they get all the protein they need from plants, why would they do that? Not a single vegan society in all of history.
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  #7   ^
Old Thu, Apr-28-22, 08:22
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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I didn't manage to read all the way through the entire study (a lot of the technical jargon goes over my head), but a couple of things stand out to me.

First of all, they're lumping vegetarianism and veganism together. Vegetarians (by today's definition) consume animal matter, just limiting it to dairy and eggs, which provide certain nutrients in forms which can be absorbed. Vegans don't eat animal matter of any kind, meaning their diet lacks certain micro-nutrients not found in plant matter in a form which can be absorbed.

It would be very possible for a vegetarian to consume sufficient proteins to attain the same level of animal protein consumption as a meat eater, and that's a limitation of this study. In my opinion, it would have given far more accurate results if the comparison had been between animal protein consumption and plant protein consumption.

Perhaps another study for another day though.

One thing that really stood out to me (which is something I've often said) was this though:

Quote:
Before agriculture was introduced (circa 119000 years ago), human ancestors could not grow, harvest and store the majority of plant-based products as the staple food. Plant foods are mostly accessible only in particular seasons of the year.26 Contrariwise, animals, including large game, small animal, fish and some insects, could constantly provide humans with meat as the staple food.


In other words, it wasn't possible for plant based foods to be THE primary source of food during a good bit of the year before the era of agriculture began. Even then, preservation methods for harvested foods were iffy at best. If every single piece of fruit was not dried sufficiently, or had picked up mold spores from the air, they could result in ruining an entire storage container of dried fruit. Up until the last couple hundred years when canning methods were first developed, it was incredibly difficult and time consuming to preserve sufficient agricultural foods to prevent total starvation during the rest of the year. Logic says that humans needed to eat animal products to survive the long winters, even after agriculture was developed.

For the most part that does mean eating meats of some kind, since most egg laying occurs in the spring and summer, and most agricultural animals providing milk would have weaned their young before the winter. So even strict vegetarianism (eggs and dairy) is a completely modern construct.


Not to mention that if they were eating eggs and dairy, what exactly were they doing with calves and lambs that were weaned and the chicks/ducklings/goslings that hatched from any uneaten eggs? What would have been the point in keeping all those, rather than eating them?



Simply put, humans have always eaten animal products - mostly meat - from the beginning, and no idealized society that eschews all animal products would have survived even the first winter.



Hence as WereBear pointed out:


Quote:
If they get all the protein they need from plants, why would they do that? Not a single vegan society in all of history.
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