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  #1   ^
Old Mon, Dec-28-20, 03:09
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default UK to ban most ‘buy one get one free’ junk food in 2022

Quote:
Most ‘buy one get one free’ junk food to be banned in 2022

“Buy one, get one free” offers on unhealthy food will be banned from April 2022, the government has confirmed.

It said that it would press ahead with plans to prohibit multibuy promotions on food and drink that is high in fat, salt or sugar, set out in a consultation on its anti-obesity strategy in July.

Big stores will not be allowed to feature those foods in key locations such as at checkouts, near entrances or at the end of aisles — or in their online equivalents such as website homepages. Restaurants and cafés will be banned from offering free refills of sugary soft drinks.

Jo Churchill, the public health minister, said: “We know families want to be presented with healthier choices. This is why we are restricting promotions and introducing a range of measures to make sure the healthy choice is the easy choice. Creating an environment which helps everyone eat healthier foods more regularly is crucial to improving the health of the nation.”

The restrictions on promotions will apply to businesses with 50 or more employees, and location restrictions to stores of more than 2,000 square feet.

About two thirds of adults in England are overweight or obese, with the NHS spending £6 billion each year on obesity-related illnesses.

The latest announcement follows proposals in November to ban advertising of unhealthy food online, with only “factual” claims allowed on websites. Junk food adverts are to be banned from television before the watershed.

Caroline Cerny, of the Obesity Health Alliance, said: “Some retailers have already taken welcome steps to help their customers be healthier by removing sweets from checkouts, but this has been inconsistent and this policy will help create a level playing field. Taking the spotlight off junk food means the only ‘buy one, get one free’ offers we see will be on healthier foods.

“The new rules won’t apply until mid-2022, so the retail and food industry has plenty of time to prepare.”

Saul Konviser, from the Dental Wellness Trust, said: “Not only will the new restrictions on selling junk food in multibuy offers and at checkouts help tackle childhood obesity, it will also significantly reduce the number of cases of tooth decay.”

However, Tim Rycroft, chief operating officer of the Food and Drink Federation, said: “It is breathtaking and insulting that the government thinks it right to issue this document . . . at the end of a year in which food and drink manufacturers have continued to toil selflessly to keep the country fed during the Covid-19 pandemic.” He said that the government had ignored evidence from industry that the proposals would have a “devastating impact”.

An eight-week technical consultation on how the plans should be implemented will begin today.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/...-2022-bp2hxg9nv
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  #2   ^
Old Sat, Jan-02-21, 00:29
Gypsybyrd's Avatar
Gypsybyrd Gypsybyrd is offline
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Plan: Atkins '72 It works best!
Stats: 281/250.8/180 Female 5'3"
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Default

I wonder if this includes foods that are high in fat like cheese or bacon. Because that would really be a bummer! I personally don’t have a problem with them banning buy one get one free candy bars and cookies. Although that’s a slippery slope and leads to possible bands on what we consider healthy food like red meat and cheese.
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  #3   ^
Old Sat, Jan-02-21, 05:14
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: Low Carb
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gypsybyrd
I wonder if this includes foods that are high in fat like cheese or bacon. Because that would really be a bummer! I personally don’t have a problem with them banning buy one get one free candy bars and cookies. Although that’s a slippery slope and leads to possible bands on what we consider healthy food like red meat and cheese.
No, real food such as cheese and bacon are not included. It is the following processed foods which under consideration:

Soft drinks with added sugar that are in scope of the soft drinks industry levy
Chocolate confectionery
Sugar confectionery
Cakes
Ice cream
Morning goods (for example pastries)
Puddings and dairy desserts
Sweet biscuits
Breakfast cereals
Yogurts
Milk drinks with added sugar
Juices with added sugar
Pizza
Crisps and savoury snacks
Ready meals and meal centres
Chips and similar potato products

https://www.gov.uk/government/consu...ice-enforcement
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  #4   ^
Old Sat, Jan-02-21, 08:58
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Very LC, Higher Protein
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Demi
No, real food such as cheese and bacon are not included. It is the following processed foods which under consideration:

Soft drinks with added sugar that are in scope of the soft drinks industry levy
Chocolate confectionery
Sugar confectionery
Cakes
Ice cream
Morning goods (for example pastries)
Puddings and dairy desserts
Sweet biscuits
Breakfast cereals
Yogurts
Milk drinks with added sugar
Juices with added sugar
Pizza
Crisps and savoury snacks
Ready meals and meal centres
Chips and similar potato products

https://www.gov.uk/government/consu...ice-enforcement

The above list provides a who's who of unhealthy, processed food, and while I am usually hesitant whenever the "authorities" start to limit food, I'm not the least hesitant in this case. Given the low cost to produce, offering a two-for-one is simply a way to get people, particularly those with limited budgets, dependent on this stuff. Quick, cheap, easy, and poisonous is really the bottom line here.
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  #5   ^
Old Sat, Jan-02-21, 09:11
Gypsybyrd's Avatar
Gypsybyrd Gypsybyrd is offline
Posts: 6,513
 
Plan: Atkins '72 It works best!
Stats: 281/250.8/180 Female 5'3"
BF:mini goal 250
Progress: 30%
Location: St. Pete, Florida
Default

I definitely agree that those foods are ripe to be subject to special regulation. However, it seems that some prepackaged low carb and keto foods would end up being included in that. And there are some people who might have trouble following a low-carb way of eating without using product like the above. Even eating healthy junk food, in my opinion, is better than eating traditional junk food.Using low-carb or keto products can’t help somebody find their way into a more clean version of this way of life. I would hate to see people discouraged.
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  #6   ^
Old Sat, Jan-02-21, 15:49
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Bob-a-rama Bob-a-rama is offline
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Plan: Keto (Atkins Induction)
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Default

While I agree with the list, I disagree with the government regulation.

On the other hand, we in the USA banned cigarette advertisements and it seems to have helped reduce smoking quite a bit.

So although I disagree with the regulation in principle, it might not be so bad. And they are not banning the junk foods altogether. While I don't think they should be selling junk food, I don't want the government deciding what is junk food. Why? Private industry uses tacit bribes to get the government to decide what is good or bad. Remember when the US told us eggs and nuts were bad and white bread was good?

As long as they stay away from cream, cheese, bacon, and other minimally processed 'real' foods I guess it's OK not to be able to run a special.

Bob
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  #7   ^
Old Sun, Jan-03-21, 02:43
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Ambulo Ambulo is offline
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Plan: No GS, IF
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They had better keep their tax well away from plain full-fat yogurt
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  #8   ^
Old Sun, Jan-03-21, 10:37
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Calianna Calianna is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambulo
They had better keep their tax well away from plain full-fat yogurt

That's what I was thinking when I read that list too! I'm hoping what they mean is that it'll only refer to the sugar loaded, flavored low fat/fat free yogurts.

I've never seen BOGO deals on yogurts, but then maybe I don't get out enough. Or maybe it's a UK thing, not common in the US, since yogurt actually has some food value as a dairy product, even if the sugary stuff isn't much different from candy.



In the store where I worked, BOGO was not the same as a half-price deal. You needed to scan the 2nd item, then the system deducted the price of the 2nd (or lower priced) item - we could not simply sell one at half price. This was so that the store would receive proper credit for the number of items sold on BOGO, and maintain accurate computer assisted inventory records. In part it had something to do with inventory values - items added to the system at full price, inventoried at full price, needed $$ credit from the manufacturer/distributor in order to not completely mess up inventory records. Not all stores do it like that though.

At any rate, almost everything that was on BOGO was utter junk - 12-packs of soda, bread, cookies, chips, candy, cereal....

But the exact same items would frequently go on sales with similar price per item as the BOGO deal's end price. Sometimes those items would cost a little more than the BOGO price, sometimes a little lower than the BOGO price. In case people haven't noticed, the regular price for a single of the BOGO item when there's a BOGO sale often goes up a little during the BOGO sale, then back down to the regular selling price the next week. So in case the stores and manufacturers haven't figured this out yet, all they really need to do to get around the BOGO on junk food prohibition is to offer the same junk at half price, or a special deal that's as good as BOGO, or almost as good as BOGO.

The idea of getting a BOGO might bring in a lot of bargain minded customers, but it won't be long before more customers become more price savvy, and will recognize that they're getting a "might as well buy 2 at this price" deal.

In other words, I don't think eliminating BOGO deals on junk food is going to do much at all to decrease junk food sales, at least not for very long.
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  #9   ^
Old Sun, Jan-03-21, 12:18
Gypsybyrd's Avatar
Gypsybyrd Gypsybyrd is offline
Posts: 6,513
 
Plan: Atkins '72 It works best!
Stats: 281/250.8/180 Female 5'3"
BF:mini goal 250
Progress: 30%
Location: St. Pete, Florida
Default

That’s a good point ... this eliminates the BOGO scheme but the grocers and manufacturers will find a way around it. In fact, after reading the regulation, this does not apply to temporary price cut of items. This may have a beneficial effect of keeping people from buying more than they actually need. I’ve always hated the buy one get ones because, as a single person, I don’t necessarily need two of something. But in order to get the lower price, I end up buying two of some thing I don’t need. I hated that in restaurant coupons to. It definitely was biased against single people.

I just went and read the regulation. Seems to be well written. I know some legislatures in the United States that can benefit from regulation writing lessons.
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  #10   ^
Old Sun, Jan-03-21, 13:43
Calianna's Avatar
Calianna Calianna is online now
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Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 63
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gypsybyrd
That’s a good point ... this eliminates the BOGO scheme but the grocers and manufacturers will find a way around it. In fact, after reading the regulation, this does not apply to temporary price cut of items. This may have a beneficial effect of keeping people from buying more than they actually need. I’ve always hated the buy one get ones because, as a single person, I don’t necessarily need two of something. But in order to get the lower price, I end up buying two of some thing I don’t need. I hated that in restaurant coupons to. It definitely was biased against single people.

I just went and read the regulation. Seems to be well written. I know some legislatures in the United States that can benefit from regulation writing lessons.



A co-worker used to get people to buy the 2nd one just by saying "it won't cost you any more than buying one, and you can always give the 2nd one away to a friend if you don't want it, or even if you want to make amends with someone you haven't been getting along with, the 2nd one would be a great peace offering". Worked pretty well - she almost always convinced them to get a second one.


She was a very helpful cashier, always talking to customers about ways to store things so they'd take up less room, or good ways to prepare certain foods, but one of the reasons she attempted to get people to get the BOGO deal was that the more the store sold (since the BOGO counted as 2 items), the more hours of work us part timers would have on our schedule.
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