Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low-Carb Studies & Research / Media Watch > LC Research/Media
User Name
Password
FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Wed, Jul-31-02, 09:29
Voyajer's Avatar
Voyajer Voyajer is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 475
 
Plan: Protein Power LP Dilletan
Stats: 164/145/138 Female 5'7"
BF:
Progress: 73%
Default The Misunderstood Fatty Acid Profile of Beef

Unfortunately, no one will believe this because it is coming from the beef industry, but it is correct [comments in brackets are mine]:


The Misunderstood Fatty Acid Profile of Beef

Consumer nutrition education, while intended to stress moderation, has generated a fat phobia. As a result, consumers have forgotten the benefits of beef, associating it only with what they believe is a nutrient to avoid - fat. Utilizing the latest technology, the beef industry has responded to consumer concerns about fat and is now producing a product that is leaner and contains less visible fat than it did 10 years ago.

Today, there are seven cuts of beef that meet government guidelines for lean designation as outlined in the 1990 Nutrition Labeling and Education Act. The Act defines lean cuts of meat as those with less than 10 grams total fat, 4.5 grams or less saturated fatty acids, and less than 95 milligrams cholesterol per serving.



A common misperception is that the majority of fats in beef are saturated fatty acids. In fact, nearly 50 percent of the fat in beef is monounsaturated fatty acids1, which are championed by health experts for their positive coronary heart risk-reduction capabilities.2 [monounsaturated fats are primarily found in olive oil and avocado and half the fat in beef is like olive oil]

A third of the saturated fatty acids in beef is stearic acid - a unique fatty acid that has a neutral effect on blood cholesterol levels.3,4,5,6 When taken into account, the amount of saturated fatty acids in beef is comparable to that of chicken and fish.1 [this is true--studies have shown that stearic acid doesn't raise cholesterol--if you subtract the stearic acid portion from the saturated fat portion of the fats in beef, you get the same amount of saturated fat that is in chicken and fish]

To reduce the risk of heart disease or cancer, experts say choose lean cuts of meat. Lean cuts of meat have less than 10 grams of fat and 4.5 grams of saturated fatty acids.

The seven cuts of beef that meet the government's requirements for lean are eye round, top round, round tip, top sirloin, bottom round, top loin and tenderloin. These cuts have, on average, 6.2 grams of total fat and 2.3 grams of saturated fatty acids per 3-ounce serving.1

Research published in the June 28, 1999 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine demonstrates that Americans can consume 6 ounces of lean red meat, five or more days a week as part of a cholesterol lowering diet and positively impact blood cholesterol levels.7 [this is true--the actual abstract follows]

The study demonstrated that both red and white meat produce the same favorable changes in blood cholesterol levels. This reduction could amount to approximately a 10 percent coronary heart disease risk reduction.8

http://www.azbbqa.com/MeatSafety/beeffattyacid.shtml

Arch Intern Med 1999 Jun 28;159(12):1331-8

Comparison of the effects of lean red meat vs lean white meat on serum lipid levels among free-living persons with hypercholesterolemia: a long-term, randomized clinical trial.

Davidson MH, Hunninghake D, Maki KC, Kwiterovich PO Jr, Kafonek S.

Chicago Center for Clinical Research, IL 60610, USA. mdavidson~protocare.com

BACKGROUND: Patients with hypercholesterolemia are often counseled to limit or eliminate intake of red meats, despite evidence that lean red meats (LRMs) are not hypercholesterolemic in comparison with lean white meats (LWMs). The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects on serum lipids of incorporating LRM (beef, veal, and pork) vs LWM (poultry and fish) into a National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Step I diet in free-living individuals with hypercholesterolemia. METHODS: Subjects included 191 men and women with a serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of 3.37 to 4.92 mmol/L (130-190 mg/dL) and triglyceride level less than 3.96 mmol/L (350 mg/dL). After a 4-week baseline phase, subjects were counseled to follow an NCEP Step I diet including 170 g (6 oz) of lean meat per day, 5 to 7 days per week. Based on random assignment, subjects were instructed to consume at least 80% of their meat in the form of LRM or LWM. Fasting serum lipid levels were assessed 4, 12, 20, 28, and 36 weeks after randomization. RESULTS: After randomization, mean concentrations of total cholesterol (6.09 mmol/L [235.7 mg/dL] vs 6.08 mmol/L [235.2 mg/dL]) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (3.99 mmol/L [154.1 mg/dL] vs4.01 mmol/L [154.7 mg/dL]) were nearly identical in the LRM and LWM groups (1%-3% below baseline) during treatment. Mean triglyceride levels remained similar to baseline values and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations increased by approximately 2% in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The NCEP Step I diets containing primarily LRM or LWM produced similar reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevations in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, which were maintained throughout 36 weeks of treatment.

------------

Journals usually allow other researchers to comment on the findings. The only comeback for this study was:

Arch Intern Med 2000 Feb 14;160(3):395-6

The lipid-lowering effect of lean meat diets falls far short of that of vegetarian diets.

Barnard ND.

Last edited by Voyajer : Wed, Jul-31-02 at 09:34.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Thu, Aug-15-02, 21:14
Voyajer's Avatar
Voyajer Voyajer is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 475
 
Plan: Protein Power LP Dilletan
Stats: 164/145/138 Female 5'7"
BF:
Progress: 73%
Default

Eur J Clin Nutr 2002 Mar;56 Suppl 1:S2-11

Meat and cancer: meat as a component of a healthy diet.

Biesalski HK.

Department of Biological Chemistry and Nutrition, University Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany. biesal~uni-hohenheim.de

Based on epidemiological studies it is assumed that meat, especially red meat, enhances risk for cancer, particularly of the colon, breast and prostate. Meat and meat products are important sources of protein, some micronutrients and fat. High fat intake has been blamed for correlation with different diseases, including cancer. Meat protein is reported to contribute to cancer formation. However, meat, including liver, is not only composed of fat and protein, it contains essential nutrients which appear exclusively in meat (vitamin A, vitamin B12) and micronutrients for which meat is the major source because of either high concentrations or better bioavailability (folate, selenium, zinc). In particular, vitamin A, folate and selenium are reported to be cancer-preventive, with respect to colon, breast and prostate cancer. Taken together, meat consists of a few, not clearly defined cancer-promoting and a lot of cancer-protecting factors. The latter can be optimized by a diet containing fruit and vegetables, which contain hundreds of more or less proven bioactive constituents, many of them showing antioxidative and anticarcinogenic effects in vitro.
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Fri, Aug-16-02, 09:28
DebPenny's Avatar
DebPenny DebPenny is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,514
 
Plan: TSP/PPLP/low-cal/My own
Stats: 250/209/150 Female 63.5 inches
BF:
Progress: 41%
Location: Sacramento, CA
Default

Unfortunately, a lot of the health benefits of beef are actually in the fat and nowadays they are focusing so much on lean, fat-trimmed beef that you can't get a good fat steak anymore. I have found one supplier (Harris Ranch angus) at Piccadilly, however, that is very nice and it's "organic." It's just not completely grass-fed, which would be better. But it's better than anything I have found in the grocery stores.

;-Deb
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Sun, Aug-18-02, 20:28
Kent's Avatar
Kent Kent is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 356
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 256/220/215 Male 78 inches
BF:36/28/20
Progress: 88%
Location: Colorado
Default

This article from the beef industry is a perfect example that the beef industry is it own worst enemy.

The beef industry strongly promotes the lean cuts of beef which gives the impression that beef fat is unhealthy. The consumer can easily see the white fat in beef but cannot see the fat in skinless chicken breast. Therefore, they prefer the chicken or turkey. The beef industry advertisements is the best thing that ever happened to the chicken and turkey industry.

The attempt of the beef industry to downplay the amount of saturated fat is another negative for beef. Even though their fat analysis is correct, the beef industry is confirming the myth that saturated fat is unhealthy instead of attacking the myths, distortions and lies about beef.

The beef industry would do well to find test case where another industry is making inaccurate statements that beef and beef fat is unhealthy. They should press a massive lawsuit that would draw considerable media attention and force the opponent to prove in court that beef causes the claimed diseases.

The beef industry would win. But they won't do that because they are chicken.

Kent
Reply With Quote
  #5   ^
Old Mon, Aug-19-02, 11:44
DebPenny's Avatar
DebPenny DebPenny is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,514
 
Plan: TSP/PPLP/low-cal/My own
Stats: 250/209/150 Female 63.5 inches
BF:
Progress: 41%
Location: Sacramento, CA
Default

I just sent an email to the Arizona Beef Council from where the article originates. Basically I told them what you said, Kent, and added a few thoughts of my own. I also gave them a link to Voyager's great synopsis of the articles about fat listed on this site.

Just one thing, Voyager. I know it would be more work, but when you do a synopsis, it would be great if there were links to each study, as it's referenced on our forum, so they could be easily referred to. Just a thought.

Thanks, both of you, for all your information and insight.

;-Deb
Reply With Quote
  #6   ^
Old Mon, Aug-19-02, 14:43
Voyajer's Avatar
Voyajer Voyajer is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 475
 
Plan: Protein Power LP Dilletan
Stats: 164/145/138 Female 5'7"
BF:
Progress: 73%
Default

Good idea Deb. I added the links to the sticky.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"Bullish beefeaters bite into restaurants' profits" gotbeer LC Research/Media 7 Fri, Oct-24-03 05:36
Beef Recall LadyBelle LC Research/Media 1 Wed, Jul-02-03 09:49
"National campaign to show value in today's beef" gotbeer LC Research/Media 1 Fri, May-16-03 13:35
Sizing up omega-3 - USA Today tamarian LC Research/Media 9 Fri, Jun-07-02 04:54
Alpha Lipoic Acid MaryErics General Low-Carb 3 Mon, Dec-17-01 11:55


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 14:06.


Copyright © 2000-2022 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.