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Old Thu, Oct-15-20, 08:36
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 3,588
 
Plan: Very LC, Higher Protein
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default Summary of Recent IF Study

Recent studies support the practice of IF in terms of weight reduction, weight management, and improvement of overall health. Received the summary link to one of these from DD this morning:

https://www.dietdoctor.com/tired-of...5111c-465973449

The findings summary:
Quote:
What does this study add to our growing knowledge base?

1. We now have more evidence that intermittent calorie reduction may be equal to chronic calorie restriction for weight and fat mass loss. This finding is important as some patients feel intermittent reduction is more feasible, long-term, than chronic restriction. Also, chronic caloric restriction can lead to an eventual decrease in basal metabolic rate and the risk of weight regain. Intermittent reduction does not appear to create the same concerns.

This study demonstrates that participants who were practicing intermittent fasting experienced a gain in fat-free mass. This contrasts with one of the recent studies we covered that suggested time-restricted eating led to a loss of fat-free mass. Since other studies have contradicted this finding, we werenít convinced.

2. This current study further shows that intermittent calorie reduction does not lead to a loss of lean tissue when the underlying diet is appropriate. In this study, the subjects ate 20% of their calories from protein, the most essential nutrient for preserving lean body mass. Unfortunately, we donít know the prior studyís corresponding value as the authors did not report that data.

3. Intermittent calorie reduction may lead to better insulin sensitivity, even with equal weight loss. The science is reasonably consistent that greater weight loss improves insulin sensitivity more. However, is there something unique about intermittent fasting or significant caloric reduction that independently improves insulin sensitivity? In this area, the science is less established, but this study suggests that there may be something uniquely beneficial about intermittent fasting.

These findings are consistent with much of the information shared on this forum. As we navigate the nutritional practice landscape with claims from people calling certain practices "fads," well-designed studies serve to confirm the validity of IF as a healthy practice. Variations of IF are always going to be the norm, as we all need to find a personal baseline; however, the ability to confirm IF as a healthy practice can now start to serve as a springboard encouraging more people to practice IF and find their personal sweet spot.
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