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-   -   How processed food makes us fat (http://forum.lowcarber.org/showthread.php?t=482794)

Demi Thu, Jul-18-19 01:43

How processed food makes us fat
 
How processed food makes us fat

Quote:
For many years, Iíve steadfastly clung to a position for which there has been almost no evidence: Processed food is the root of obesity.

This doesnít mean that processed food is the sole cause. Thereís also the ubiquity of food, changing social mores and what is probably a more sedentary lifestyle (though evidence for that, too, is surprisingly hard to come by). It also doesnít mean that all processed food is bad. Whole-grain bread and cereal are excellent, and there are good versions of such things as frozen pizza and jarred pasta sauce. Also wine.

What it does mean is that modern industrial food processing ó and only modern industrial food processing ó has enabled the manufacture of the cheap, convenient, calorie-dense foods engineered to appeal to us that have become staples of our obesogenic diet. By one estimate, nearly 60 percent of our calories come from ultra-processed food.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/life...m=.b9b99157da55

WereBear Thu, Jul-18-19 05:31

I guess this is a Moderation article? 😀

Ms Arielle Thu, Jul-18-19 06:33

Processing has mad otherwise fairly healthy options into just cant eat just one potato chips, nachos, etc. I cant eat just one Taco chip. I buy a whole bag and DONT share it. So I dont buy it.

Candy is cheap and readily available in any checkout line. I stopped bringing my little ones to do the shopping. IT was torture for them and me. NO, no, no.......

Quote:
This doesnít mean that processed food is the sole cause...


But it was the beginning, and likely driving 90% of today's obesity...... along with a flawed food pyramid and those that push it.

The more I eat the whole foods ( meats, veg, and limit fruit to low GI in small portions) the more processed food is out of my brain, including the salamis and baloney. ( Suspect hand crafted sausages are a totally different food.)

Bonnie OFS Thu, Jul-18-19 08:57

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Processing has mad otherwise fairly healthy options into just cant eat just one potato chips, nachos, etc. I cant eat just one Taco chip. I buy a whole bag and DONT share it. So I dont buy it.


In spite of knowing better, I occasionally buy a bag of Smokehouse almonds. I can practice moderation for a few days, but eventually my cravings get the better of me. It's a good thing I never got addicted to any drug worse than nicotine (which I quit many years ago) - I'd be dead by now.

Ms Arielle Thu, Jul-18-19 09:09

Watched a TV program within the last few days focusing on the addictions that fill our lives now. THe speaker talked on and on that we have difficulties with gradification, my word not his, and yet I see a number of factors playing into this. It starts with too much instantly available..... learning to wait to get what we want is a learned skill...... and parents dont know how to teach it in a world of abundance. And add on that so much of what is available acts like a drug on the brains: TV, highly stimulating conflict movies, bread, and sugar.....

We are born to addiction now.....

WereBear Thu, Jul-18-19 09:38

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Watched a TV program within the last few days focusing on the addictions that fill our lives now. THe speaker talked on and on that we have difficulties with gradification, my word not his, and yet I see a number of factors playing into this. It starts with too much instantly available..... learning to wait to get what we want is a learned skill...... and parents dont know how to teach it in a world of abundance. And add on that so much of what is available acts like a drug on the brains: TV, highly stimulating conflict movies, bread, and sugar.....

We are born to addiction now.....


I am not impressed with this ďreasoningĒ because we change our brain chemicals every day; not only what we eat, but what we do, the environment we are in, what we are hearing and seeing and interacting with.

When I was a troubled teen, I would do anything to make the screaming in my brain STOP. Food was a drug I could afford.

Now, I donít want those foods, donít want to binge, donít want to mess up what returned health I am enjoying.

And I donít want those foods any more.

Ms Arielle Thu, Jul-18-19 09:46

Oh, he is all for changing what we eat and WHY we should!!!

CityGirl8 Thu, Jul-18-19 10:14

It's funny, but I'm getting to a point where I don't think "processed" food is the root of all evil. Once I realized we didn't have a decent definition of it and it could encompass everything from Gatorade to mac & cheese to pork rinds to bacon, I started to re-think. Just because someone else has made it for you, is it inherently bad? I don't think so.

What I think is bad is the ingredients in a lot of those foods and we need to start making a distinction. Tons of sugar? Bad. Excess carbs? Bad. Chemical preservatives? Bad. Wheat and gluten? Bad for some people period, bad in excess for everyone. Bacon? Not bad.

Ms Arielle Thu, Jul-18-19 10:37

Definition of Processed for me-- does it look like it came from a whole food?? Or has it been, chopped up, separated, additives added, etc until it is not recognizable.

Bottom line , for me, would a human have eaten it 150 years ago??

American cheese v. cheddar
gatorade v. water

Most processed meats have nitrates added; adding nitrates is a new thing, historically. More non- nitrated added products becoming available.

I look for recipes where I can use straight from the hoof or straight from the garden as a baseline now. Otherwise, I ask myself " what has been done to it?" And check it out.

Aged meats increase the histamines; for most, not a problem, for others it is; also regulations may require adding nitrates.

Ya, I do eat some processed foods anyway!! :yum:

Bonnie OFS Thu, Jul-18-19 11:06

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Bottom line , for me, would a human have eaten it 150 years ago??


I've been reading a very informative book called "Hippie Food" by Jonathan Kauffman. That was pretty much the driving force for the introduction of health foods (because, obviously, modern foods were unhealthy). Some of the early adopters went overboard on some pretty strange "healthful" additives, but I think they were on the right track, even tho most leaned heavily to vegetarianism.

Since I was eating a lot of "healthy whole grains" in the early '70s (in spite of smoking), I've found the descriptions in the book are making me crave what I ate & loved; brown rice, lentils, homemade bread, potatoes in all sorts of forms, etc. Tho I drew the line at giving up butter. The closest I came to the low-fat idea was better butter - equal parts butter & canola oil beaten together.

While I love what I eat now - lots of leafy greens, homemade salad dressing, meat in many forms & lots of eggs - I sill miss those foods.

Sniggle Thu, Jul-18-19 11:39

It was so much easier to stay thin, back in the day, when if you did not hunt or gather or source fire wood everyday you starved.

I suspect that in a post apocalyptic world (think meteor strike) obesity will be less of a concern.

Ms Arielle Thu, Jul-18-19 13:22

yup.

We are not waiting for a meteor strike--- food scarcity is real for far too many people around the world NOW.

Can you imagine eliminating the ultra processed foods, and keeping the foods as a more wholesome product??? Food would cost far less.

I love the cooking shows and those featureing MExican cuisine, visit the market places. Real. WHole. Foods. Some are dried; some are ground. OThers still alive. THAT is what our foods should look like.

( it took me years to arrive at this conclusion.... so I know Im in the minority.)


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