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Sweetie_Au
Thu, Nov-28-02, 16:59
Hi all....

I'm interested to know what kind of exercise people find most beneficial. I am also interested to hear the impacts exercise has on their BGL.

I try to walk for 30-60 minutes each day (as well as all the normal daily activities). Interestingly (and annoyingly) this always seems to raise my BGL, and when it drops, it only drops to the pre-walk level.

I hear a lot about people exercising to lower their BGL's, but doesn't seem to work for me :mad:

Cheers
Sweetie

catspaw
Thu, Nov-28-02, 20:05
Hi Sweetie,

I have found that normally my BG goes up slightly after exercising unless I exercise pretty intensely for more than 40 minutes.

Doing weights doesn't lower it, but a 4-5 mile run will.

Lisa N
Thu, Nov-28-02, 20:59
I think over for the long run, Dr. Bernstein is a big promotor of weight resistance training for helping control blood sugars. It may not lower them immediately, but more muscle means higher metabolism and less insulin resistance overall.

DarkLotus
Fri, Nov-29-02, 02:56
My dad started working out with me (45 mins of weights and 40 mins of cardio) a little over a month ago. He recently had his blood sugar levels redone, and it's half of what it was! And he hasn't started Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution yet (he's still reading it). So, I guess exercise can make a huge difference for a diabetic.

TomX
Thu, Dec-12-02, 08:13
Exercise drops my blood sugars really fast. I just make sure I sweat and I get fatigued enough that it would be difficult to talk (not impossible) and I keep myself there for at least 15 minutes if I can. My sugars will normally drop 30-40 points after a good workout. I'm moving toward working with weights as per Bernstein's suggestion, but I think a good cardio workout really helps me.

Tom

Quiet Man
Thu, Dec-12-02, 14:41
You really begin to notice a drop in your levels AFTER you drop 5 lbs

kjturner
Fri, Dec-13-02, 01:32
I have found walking and stair climbing work best for me as long as I don't overdo it. I've found that 30 mins of brisk walking or 10 mins of stair climbing lower my BGL by 20-30 points, but for me doing more than that raises my BGL. If I walk more than 30 mins (I like to go hiking) then I take my time and don't walk briskly. I get the same results. I guess for me it's a 'stress' thing. If I excercise for longer than those amounts my body perceives it as stress and the liver will kick in extra glucose to help overcome the stress. I can also break up my excercise into small segments, such as doing 1 set of stairs (5 floors) 3 times a day rather than 3 sets of 5 floors once. Both give me the same results, but an hour of brisk walking (not hiking) will raise BGL as well as doing more than 3 sets of stairs.

KJherper
Mon, Jan-06-03, 15:45
I have had similar problems with my blood sugar after excercise. I thought it was just me. I have been working out pretty hard lately and my blood sugar seems to go up even if I haven't eaten anything high carb. My theory is that as I am burning fat, I am releasing the glusose stored there. Not sure if this is true or not. I do weight training and alot of cardio.

Lisa N
Mon, Jan-06-03, 16:33
I pulled out Dr. Bernstein's book and here's what he has to say about blood glucose rising after exercise (found on page 171):

"Moderate to strenuous exercise such as swimming, running, weight lifting or tennis-as opposed to more casual exercise such as walking-causes an immediate release of "stress" or counterregulatory hormones (epinephrine, cortisol, etc..). These signal the liver and muscles to return glucose to the bloodstream by converting stored glycogen into glucose....If a type 2 diabetic without phase 1 insulin response were to exercise for a few minutes, his blood sugar might increase for a while, but eventually it would return to normal, thanks to the phase 2 insulin response. Thus, brief strenuous exercise can raise blood sugar, while prolonged exercise can lower it."

and on page 170 regarding the long-term effects of exercise on blood sugars: "Long-term, regular, strenuous exercise also reduces insulin resistance independently of its effect upon muscle mass. This makes you more sensitive to your own and injected insulin. As a result, your own insulin production gradually becomes more effective at lowering blood sugar...Although increased muscle bulk also increases insulin sensitivity, independently of the above effect, this is very gradual and may require many months of bodybuilding before becoming noticible."

HTH! :)

KJherper
Mon, Jan-06-03, 17:16
Does the book mention anything about Type I diabetics?

Lisa N
Mon, Jan-06-03, 18:51
It does say a bit on page 171 and 172: "When insulin is nearly absent in the blood, the glucose released in response to stress hormones cannot readily enter muscle and liver cells. As a result, blood sugar continues to rise and the muscles must rely upon stored fat for energy. On the other hand, suppose that you have injected just enough long-acting insulin within the previous 12 hours to keep your blood sugar on target without exercise and then you run a few miles. You will have a higher serum insulin level than needed, because exercise facilitates the action of the insulin already present. Blood sugar may therefore drop too low. The same effect may occur if you are using OHAs (oral hypoglycemic agents). Furthermore, if you have injected insulin into tissue that overlies the muscle being exercised, or perhaps into the muscle itself, the rate of release of insulin into the bloodstream may be so great as to cause severe hypoglycemia."

He goes on to say that he feels it would be unwise for anyone to exercise if their blood sugar exceeds 200 mg/dl because elevated blood sugars have a tendency to rise even higher with exercise.

HTH

Guillermo
Wed, Oct-04-06, 10:40
I have found that if I exercise, I should wait at least 40 - 45 minutes before I check my blood again. I have had hard physical jobs before and now I have a desk job so I have to find some outlet. Now that I'm in my 50's my doctor made me quit basketball and softball. Now I bike and walk. I used to run but I don't like the pounding, so I try to walk hills (I live in Colorado) and that seems to work for me pretty good. Some studies I've read indicate that a person needs to exercise strenuously for 90 minutes before significantly affecting blood levels, but they may be referring to the cellular level. I would exercise and check my blood and get discouraged because it was still high or even higher. Now I wait about 40 - 45 minutes and I see a drop of 20 - 30 points.


Hi all....

I'm interested to know what kind of exercise people find most beneficial. I am also interested to hear the impacts exercise has on their BGL.

I try to walk for 30-60 minutes each day (as well as all the normal daily activities). Interestingly (and annoyingly) this always seems to raise my BGL, and when it drops, it only drops to the pre-walk level.

I hear a lot about people exercising to lower their BGL's, but doesn't seem to work for me :mad:

Cheers
Sweetie

mainelydav
Wed, Oct-04-06, 12:26
My goal is 30 minutes of exercise at least six days a week. It could be walking, jogging on a treadmill, swimming, elliptical, whatever. But for me, it's worked. Helped my weight loss and stabilize my blood glucose levels. I just plain feel better when I exercise on a routine basis.

dina1957
Wed, Oct-04-06, 22:40
Hi all....

I'm interested to know what kind of exercise people find most beneficial. I am also interested to hear the impacts exercise has on their BGL.

I try to walk for 30-60 minutes each day (as well as all the normal daily activities). Interestingly (and annoyingly) this always seems to raise my BGL, and when it drops, it only drops to the pre-walk level.

I hear a lot about people exercising to lower their BGL's, but doesn't seem to work for me :mad:

Cheers
Sweetie
Swimming is absolutely the best for lowering BGs, walking is next. But YMMV.

Sherrielee
Thu, Oct-05-06, 21:26
Swimming is my best friend too, followed closely by the treadmill. (Swimming is a bit more fun.)

I can actually drop 40 pts on the treadmill in 40 mins! So, I like it for that!

Guillermo
Fri, Oct-06-06, 10:08
whenever i go swimming i get hungrier than a ...
so i guess when you get hungry like that you're dropping bg levels

LizardQuee
Fri, Oct-06-06, 13:04
Step aerobics is it for me. Efficient, works both cardio and big muscles, doesn't take much room (I do it in front of a small TV in the basement), not too dancy (I have 2 left feet), and it really works me out. I can get more of a workout out of 30 min of step aerobics than out of an hour of walking.

If try it the best tape (IMHO) is the "Step Reebok" one - simple moves, long enough, very well cued.

LQ

dina1957
Mon, Oct-09-06, 20:05
Swimming is my best friend too, followed closely by the treadmill. (Swimming is a bit more fun.)

I can actually drop 40 pts on the treadmill in 40 mins! So, I like it for that!
I just came from Hawaii where I swam a lot, and I figured I can eat waaaay more carbs before, since an hour of swiming will keep it in low 80s for exended period of time. I haven't seen any exercise that loweres my Bgs as good as swimmng does, and it is great for getting toned and losing weight without any impact on joints. Unfortunately, the vacation is over, and now I need to find a decent swimming pool. Swimming and walking both fun especially when taken outdoor. ;)
As for the weight lifting, if initially always raises my BGs, but then Bgs will drop after workout.