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Nancy LC
Thu, Mar-08-12, 11:36
Pink slime (http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2012/03/70-percent-of-ground-beef-at-supermarkets-contains-pink-slime/) is on the menu almost everywhere.

Urgh. I don't mind that scraps are getting used, but the ammonia treatment and pervasive use and putting it into everything from bread to meat, without having to declare it, is an issue for me.

The “pink slime” is made by gathering waste trimmings, simmering them at low heat so the fat separates easily from the muscle, and spinning the trimmings using a centrifuge to complete the separation. Next, the mixture is sent through pipes where it is sprayed with ammonia gas to kill bacteria. The process is completed by packaging the meat into bricks. Then, it is frozen and shipped to grocery stores and meat packers, where it is added to most ground beef.Waste trimmings, I have no issue with. It's fat, meat, connective tissue... all edible and tasty. It's what they do with it...

The good news is:
BURGER CHAINS DROP USE OF CHEMICAL IN BURGERS CALLED
“PINK SLIME” (http://www.skyvalleychronicle.com/BREAKING-NEWS/BURGER-CHAINS-DROP-USE-OF-CHEMICAL-IN-BURGERS-CALLED-PINK-SLIME-861300)McDonald’s has now been joined by Taco Bell and Burger King in discontinuing use of the product.

ABC News has learned the woman who made the decision to OK the mix is a former undersecretary of agriculture, Joann Smith. It was a call that led to hundred of millions of dollars for Beef Products Inc., the makers of pink slime.
When Smith stepped down from the USDA in 1993, BPI’s principal major supplier appointed her to its board of directors, where she made at least $1.2 million over 17 years.
Another fine example of Corpocracy in action.

nifty55
Thu, Mar-08-12, 12:41
For a moment there I thought it was going to be recycled liposuction waste :Puke: but I guess they'll get round to that eventually ...

MizKitty
Thu, Mar-08-12, 13:31
Wow, never knew anything about pink slime. Thanks for the article. I wonder how in the world we figure out which 30% of grocery store ground beef does NOT contain it? The "sprayed with chemicals" part is an issue for me, too.

Nancy LC
Thu, Mar-08-12, 13:34
I don't really eat much ground beef, but in the future I'll make my own. You can do it in a food processor, you don't need a meat grinder. I think Alton Brown did 10 one second pulse. A mix of chuck and sirloin, he said, is best.

Squarecube
Thu, Mar-08-12, 14:12
I don't really eat much ground beef, but in the future I'll make my own. You can do it in a food processor, you don't need a meat grinder. I think Alton Brown did 10 one second pulse. A mix of chuck and sirloin, he said, is best.

Every time I've made ground lamb/or beef my own in the food processor I've loved it. Maybe there's no slime?

On second thought, I love braised meats, and isn't slime "kinda" like braising?

lovemyvet
Thu, Mar-08-12, 14:20
it's not just the chemicals, which of course are bad enough. it's the fact that the slaughtering and processing practices are so unsanitary that there's supposedly the need to treat with ammonia to kill bacteria and make it safe for human consumption.

Nancy LC
Thu, Mar-08-12, 14:42
On second thought, I love braised meats, and isn't slime "kinda" like braising?Do you braise your meats in ammonia? :lol:
it's not just the chemicals, which of course are bad enough. it's the fact that the slaughtering and processing practices are so unsanitary that there's supposedly the need to treat with ammonia to kill bacteria and make it safe for human consumption.I don't think you can have a slaughterhouse that slaughters at the volume they do and expect it to be pathogen free. Animals carry pathogens, so escaping them is impossible. I'm sure they take whatever shortcuts they can get away with too.

However, the pathogens have gotten really nasty since the CAFO's and dosing animals with antibiotics.

aj_cohn
Thu, Mar-08-12, 15:30
I got an e-activist message (http://www.credoaction.com/campaign/pink_slime/?rc=homepage) about this from Credo Mobile this morning, because the USDA continues feeding this stuff to kids and plans to buy seven million pounds of it for school lunches.

HappyLC
Thu, Mar-08-12, 15:34
I started noticing about a year or so ago that the ground beef I was buying from the supermarket smelled like garbage when I browned it. I wondered if something had changed, or if it had always smelled like that and my sense of smell had suddenly become more acute. (Duh.) Then I switched to good grass-fed ground beef and guess what? When I'm browning it, it smells like steak cooking!

I can't believe it's legal to put this crap in our foods. It's really scary.

askwhy456
Thu, Mar-08-12, 17:09
Suddenly I'm not very hungry. AND I'm thinking the same thing about the ground beef (the 'bad' smell when cooking even though it looks good) that I buy from the local grocery store.

Sunny_0ne
Thu, Mar-08-12, 19:19
If 30% of the ground beef sold has pink slime in it, I am betting it is those one pound tubes that are in an opaque wrapper with the picture of ground beef on it.

I looked at my ground round today that is ground by my supermarket, and there is a definite difference in appearance from the ground beef in the plastic tubes.

MizKitty
Thu, Mar-08-12, 19:35
If 30% of the ground beef sold has pink slime in it

It was 70%

bike2work
Thu, Mar-08-12, 20:10
One more reason to shop at Whole Foods. I think they grind their meat from meat.

ICDogg
Thu, Mar-08-12, 22:32
If 30% of the ground beef sold has pink slime in it, I am betting it is those one pound tubes that are in an opaque wrapper with the picture of ground beef on it.

I looked at my ground round today that is ground by my supermarket, and there is a definite difference in appearance from the ground beef in the plastic tubes.

I doubt it.

I get some great grass fed beef packaged in similar tubes.

RubySpider
Thu, Mar-08-12, 23:51
I am glad I read this, I had wondered why the big chain hamburger smelled weird when I was cooking it- it wasn't because the ground beef was old or bad looking. We never had a problem buying higher fat hamburger patties, but started getting the lowest fat ones because my husband complained that the flavor of the high fat ones had been "off". It doesn't look like the pink slime is a recently implemented product, so I wonder why the hamburger I had been buying has changed so much in the last 5-6 months? I got tired of my husband complaining so I started getting my beef from a smaller store that gets its beef locally. My dad never bought preformed hamburger patties, I was just being lazy. I made my own patties and they tasted so much better! Well, one mystery solved.

DAGrant
Fri, Mar-09-12, 08:06
How absolutely disgusting. I think they should cart the lady who approved this off and make her eat a batch of the goo!

I didn't realize they were mixing this in the burger at the stores. ewwww!

leemack
Fri, Mar-09-12, 08:23
It seems like its the lean ground beef that has the 'pink slime', the fattiest ground beef should be ok because fat is the 'filler'. Most people want lean meat nowadays which is more expensive - put in a filler and instant increase in profits.

Lee

Ron_Mocci
Fri, Mar-09-12, 08:49
Just Thanks (:

askwhy456
Fri, Mar-09-12, 09:07
Well now I have to ask at every store where I buy meat if they use this stuff and in what.... Hope they are honest...

lovemyvet
Fri, Mar-09-12, 09:45
Anyone here have kids who watch Spongebob? It sounds like the stuff Plankton serves at the Chumbucket. :lol: And you thought it was just a cartoon. Looks like the joke really is on us. :eek:

esam
Fri, Mar-09-12, 12:01
**pricing a grinder attachment for my kitchen-aid mixer**

I'm sooooo not buying pre-ground meat anymore.

*gag*

MizKitty
Fri, Mar-09-12, 12:07
It seems like its the lean ground beef that has the 'pink slime', the fattiest ground beef should be ok because fat is the 'filler'. Most people want lean meat nowadays which is more expensive - put in a filler and instant increase in profits.

Lee

I'm not really following your reasoning, I was thinking it was just the opposite. Pink Slime is fat, so it's being added to all the burger to bring the fat content to 80/20 or whatever, and perhaps the very leanest stuff, the 97/3 MIGHT not have it.

After this made the evening news shows, I bet meat departments are getting lots of questions about it. I can just imagine the staff meetings being held to decide what the "official" damage-control answer should be.

Nancy LC
Fri, Mar-09-12, 12:10
You'd think in this day and age they'd realize they can't hide these sorts of shennigans and someone will eventually call them out. What with social media and so on, it'll be everywhere very quickly.

Of course, it looks like this was done back in 2007 anyway, they did get away with it for quite awhile. :p

MizKitty
Fri, Mar-09-12, 12:14
I wonder if a chain grocer would let you pick out a chuck roast and grind it for you, like they'll slice a ham for free?

Nancy LC
Fri, Mar-09-12, 12:16
They used to! I have had them grind lamb for me.

lovemyvet
Fri, Mar-09-12, 12:27
I'm not really following your reasoning, I was thinking it was just the opposite. Pink Slime is fat, so it's being added to all the burger to bring the fat content to 80/20 or whatever, and perhaps the very leanest stuff, the 97/3 MIGHT not have it.

After this made the evening news shows, I bet meat departments are getting lots of questions about it. I can just imagine the staff meetings being held to decide what the "official" damage-control answer should be.

that was my thinking as well. the fattier the meat the more likely it's been "slimed".

lovemyvet
Fri, Mar-09-12, 12:29
I wonder if a chain grocer would let you pick out a chuck roast and grind it for you, like they'll slice a ham for free?

if your grocer has a regular meat counter (not just a section with prepacked meats) then they'll have a butcher who will grind it no charge.

Zei
Fri, Mar-09-12, 12:30
I've known about the pink slime for quite some time compliments to someone's past post on this website, thank-you whoever it was. We do use a lot of ground beef, so to avoid the pink slime I asked my local grocery stores about their ground beef. If it comes pre-ground from afar whether repackaged into nice little packs that look fresh or those long plastic tubes, I don't buy it. The meat counter folks at the local Kroger showed me how to recognize their packages which were ground right there from in-store meat scraps so I buy those. My big concern avoiding the pink slime product (yuck factor aside) is E coli germs not being adequately killed by the amonia treatment. If you're on a tight food budget and can't afford the nice grass fed beef from higher priced stores, you might be able to find a store like that Kroger where some of the meat they grind themselves.

Merpig
Fri, Mar-09-12, 12:33
I started noticing about a year or so ago that the ground beef I was buying from the supermarket smelled like garbage when I browned it. I wondered if something had changed, or if it had always smelled like that and my sense of smell had suddenly become more acute. (Duh.) Then I switched to good grass-fed ground beef and guess what? When I'm browning it, it smells like steak cooking! I've tried both of the varieties of grass-fed ground beef sold at my local supermarket and they both smell bad and taste bad. In fact I have not bought grass-fed ground beef anywhere that tastes decent to me. They all taste like cr*p and have an awful texture. Why is that? Back in NJ I was a huge fan of Elevation Burger who ground their grass-fed beef daily on the premises and their hamburgers were totally awesome. I miss them.

But this pink slime thing grosses me out. I think my food processor is going to start to get much more of a workout, or I can drag out my old-fashioned hand-cranked meat grinder. Maybe I'll check with the local butcher. I have not bought ground beef from her yet because she sources all her beef from Iowa, so I assume it's your standard CAFO grain-fed beef. But it still might be better than eating pink slime.

aj_cohn
Fri, Mar-09-12, 12:48
I wonder if a chain grocer would let you pick out a chuck roast and grind it for you, like they'll slice a ham for free?

Even if the grocer would, it would be expensive. You lose about 1 lb out of every 4 when they grind it. Buy a food processor or a meat-grinder attachment for your mixer, and do it yourself.

MizKitty
Fri, Mar-09-12, 12:55
Even if the grocer would, it would be expensive. You lose about 1 lb out of every 4 when they grind it. Buy a food processor or a meat-grinder attachment for your mixer, and do it yourself.

Thanks for letting me know that, that would make it expensive. I don't own a food processor or mixer, the closest thing I've got is a Magic Bullet, which would probably be ok for 2 oz batches! lol I priced meat grinders on Amazon, and it looks like you'll pay at least $200 for one with enough power.

I guess I just need to find a small local butcher or meat market or Whole Foods or something. We've given thought to buying half a cow and having it custom portioned up once a year, since we do have a deep freeze. That idea just started looking better.

esam
Fri, Mar-09-12, 13:02
Even if the grocer would, it would be expensive. You lose about 1 lb out of every 4 when they grind it. Buy a food processor or a meat-grinder attachment for your mixer, and do it yourself.

how do you lose it??? they keep some???

Nancy LC
Fri, Mar-09-12, 13:06
My Mom had a hand cranked meat grinder that was quite a good tool. I remember she always did cranberries and oranges in it when I was a kid (for cranberry relish at Thanksgiving).

Anyway, the thing was very sturdy and she had it all the time I was living at home and long after, I think.

how do you lose it??? they keep some???I was wondering the same. AFAIK, you get it back just fine, all ground. They can't charge you for what isn't in the package.

aj_cohn
Fri, Mar-09-12, 13:12
The butcher told me that it gets lost in the grinder itself.

aj_cohn
Fri, Mar-09-12, 13:14
We've given thought to buying half a cow and having it custom portioned up once a year, since we do have a deep freeze. That idea just started looking better.
:thup: :agree:

I do this but get only 1/4 of a cow. It's definitely the most economical route. Start at eatwild.org to find the closest rancher that sells cow shares.

leemack
Fri, Mar-09-12, 13:31
I'm not really following your reasoning, I was thinking it was just the opposite. Pink Slime is fat, so it's being added to all the burger to bring the fat content to 80/20 or whatever, and perhaps the very leanest stuff, the 97/3 MIGHT not have it.

After this made the evening news shows, I bet meat departments are getting lots of questions about it. I can just imagine the staff meetings being held to decide what the "official" damage-control answer should be.

My reasoning was from the video - they said it was lean ground beef, and that they removed the fat from the slime first.

Lee

MizKitty
Fri, Mar-09-12, 13:40
Well that's some pretty sound reasoning then. LOL! Thanks.

esam
Fri, Mar-09-12, 14:26
aj- that llink didn't work for me
do you have another site?

KarenJ
Fri, Mar-09-12, 16:44
Anyone here have kids who watch Spongebob? It sounds like the stuff Plankton serves at the Chumbucket. :lol: And you thought it was just a cartoon. Looks like the joke really is on us. :eek:

:lol: :lol: :lol: Bingo.

esam
Fri, Mar-09-12, 17:05
sale ad for my local grocery store, ground beef 2.49/lb Fresh ground on site, no fillers, or additives. 100%guarranteed or double your money back,

*whew* this should hold me until my MIL can find the grinder thingy for my mixer!!!!!!!

yarralea
Fri, Mar-09-12, 17:08
Oh this entire thread has just grossed me out. I wonder if these practices occur in Australia? The food quality is excellent here generally, the farming appears less intensive, as does the processing, but who knows.

The thing that would also concern me is the " how many animals are represented in that patty" factor. And what else is pink slime used for? Like sub grade pink slime ( wrong term hey) being used to feed pigs. There was a scare in the UK called mad cows disease where millions of cows and pigs were slaughtered after cased of mad cows disease were transferred to humans, and people died. One of the causes was deemed, I believe, in animals eating animal remains as feed, which caused a nasty disease in the animals brain. And it was a pretty nasty death for the people too.

Still not enough to turn me vegetarian.

tragedian
Fri, Mar-09-12, 17:39
I have zero issue with the parts that are used, and i think the information that is getting out about pink slime is primarily sensationalist in nature, but i also think the real issue, which im not really hearing being brought up, is that if the source animals were farmed and raised in better, more sanitary conditions, and not fed things they are not biologically adapted to eat, and not treated with antibiotics and hormones and whatever other chemicals they add nowadays, and not genetically modified so that, while they yield more meat, they are also a much less healthy animal, and the conditions under which they are slaughtered were more sanitary.......THEN;

There would be no need to ammonize this substance, and it would be a more respectable food.

Plus...*gasp*...the industry itself wouldn't be this shadowy business we here all love to hate, in a hundred different ways that i wont bother to list here.

aj_cohn
Fri, Mar-09-12, 17:41
yarralea,

Don't know about the use of "pink slime," but the Australian meat processors have been known to use "meat glue" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydzIlKJmwV4) to disguise low-quality meats as higher-quality cuts.

Merpig
Fri, Mar-09-12, 18:20
My Mom had a hand cranked meat grinder that was quite a good tool. I remember she always did cranberries and oranges in it when I was a kid (for cranberry relish at Thanksgiving). Yes, those work great, and you might even see one in a second hand shop for a small amount. I have one of them myself, inherited from my dad. We also used it to grind oranges and cranberries when I was a kid. I still remember asking to do it, and you could look in the top and watch the cranberries slowly revolved down towards the grinding end, and as the ones I watched got there I would start screaming, "Ah, oh no, eek, arrrgghh" :lol: But I was thinking of trying to resurrect it for grinding meat.

chicachyna
Fri, Mar-09-12, 19:22
Groceries around here, Tucson, will grind any meat you purchase there, no charge. Why would you lose 25% if they grind it?

madeyna
Fri, Mar-09-12, 19:40
Those old fashioned crank grinders work great. We used one for years to grind up deer meat. If you want the meat to stick together well you can buy a highfat filler from your butcher but you don,t have to add the filler. The downside to the handcrank grinders is they have to attach to a table our counter so If you have a large lip or fancy edge they won,t attach well.

ICDogg
Fri, Mar-09-12, 20:07
My mother has a meat grinder attachment for her Kitchenaid mixer.

looks like this:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31GcpUfuXzL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Sunny_0ne
Fri, Mar-09-12, 20:11
I'll bet that vienna sausages and some hot dogs also have a lot of pink slime in them.

I switched to Nathan's or Hebrew International hot dogs because they are supposed to be made from kosher meat. That way I know I'm not getting any pig snouts or pink slime in them, at least.

esam
Fri, Mar-09-12, 21:17
un-wholly cow!!!!

I love vienna sausages, (yes, that's my dirty little secret!) but you're right, they have GOT to be full of the odd ear, snout, or other such protrusion.......

will be giving them up. Local grocery store also has bottom round roasts- buy 1 get 1 free!!

yarralea
Sat, Mar-10-12, 00:45
yarralea,

Don't know about the use of "pink slime," but the Australian meat processors have been known to use "meat glue" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydzIlKJmwV4) to disguise low-quality meats as higher-quality cuts.

Oh meat glue, that's okay the doctor has been telling us to eat 6-8 glasses of meat glue per day.

Will be checking out that link, I just needed to add a chuckle :lol:

Nancy LC
Sat, Mar-10-12, 10:09
They use the meat-glue here too. I'm not sure how pervasive it is, but I know they use it in some restaurants to make "fancy cuts" from bits and pieces of meat.

*sigh*

Nancy LC
Sat, Mar-10-12, 10:19
I love vienna sausages, (yes, that's my dirty little secret!) but you're right, they have GOT to be full of the odd ear, snout, or other such protrusion.......

I don't think there's anything wrong with eating an animal from tip to tail. It's what humans always did in the past. It is much less wasteful and all those bits, well, most of them, are edible, nutritious and tasty. I'd be far more concerned about the processing they do to turn them into something that looks like what most fussy consumers think is the only edible part: muscle meat.

lovemyvet
Sat, Mar-10-12, 12:11
i have no issue with tip to tail either and i'm not even close to carnivore or paleo. i do come from a family history of farmers, however. you don't let things go to waste. the issue really is the abhorent slaughtering, handling and processing practices in this country.

KarenJ
Sat, Mar-10-12, 12:34
I tried the tip to tail eating and couldn't wrap my brain around it. I think it was the pigs ears that I couldn't get right.

tragedian
Sat, Mar-10-12, 13:47
Yeah, i honestly would try probably any part sauteed up in some butter. Lips, eyelids, and all.

Atrsy
Sat, Mar-10-12, 17:21
The pink slime grosses me out too, but they aren't soaking the meat in ammonia, they are using a gas to treat it. So maybe it's safer than we want to believe.

I remember when I worked at an ice cream store when I was a teenager and we cleaned the ice cream machine with clorox water. I thought that was really gross, too, but I guess until morning the clorox had all dissapated and wasn't a threat but it did kill all bacteria. Maybe that is what happens to the slime. Not that I want to eat it either, but it may not be all that harmful.

But I did see a video of a man using "meat glue" to make chunks of lesser grade beef into filet mignon. He said that even most butchers would have trouble seeing that it wasn't what it was sold as. The meat glue that he used was a white powder and he said it was so toxic that he had to wear gloves when handling the meat with it on it. Now, that is really scary to me. So I don't want to buy steaks of any kind from Australia or China.

chicachyna
Sun, Mar-11-12, 07:25
I bought a chuck steak yesterday, had the butcher grind it for me. Grilled burgers outside til med-rare. It was good, but I think I'm used to a more fatty burger! Too lean for me! I love burgers, even without the bun now, so I guess I'll keep experimenting with whole cuts, freshly ground.

Nancy LC
Sun, Mar-11-12, 09:59
Alton Brown recommends a mix of chuck and sirlon. The chuck will have the fat you're missing.

Nancy LC
Sun, Mar-11-12, 10:02
Yeah, i honestly would try probably any part sauteed up in some butter. Lips, eyelids, and all.
Those would probably go into sausages. Or be fed to the hogs, dogs or what have you. :)

Tongue, heart, brains, liver, kidneys, many of the glands, those used to be prized for deliciousness. They're starting to make a come back in fine dining.

Pig ears I saw used in an episode of Top Chef.

chicachyna
Mon, Mar-12-12, 07:07
the first ingredient on a package of mexican style chorizo was ... lung. the second was lymph node. i wish i hadn't read that. i used to like chorizo...

esam
Mon, Mar-12-12, 08:49
the first ingredient on a package of mexican style chorizo was ... lung. the second was lymph node. i wish i hadn't read that. i used to like chorizo...


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

I'm soooo sorry to laugh, but I completely agree with you!!!!!

HappyLC
Mon, Mar-12-12, 09:04
My mother has a meat grinder attachment for her Kitchenaid mixer.

looks like this:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31GcpUfuXzL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Wow, that looks familiar. I have a feeling I have that attachment packed away somewhere...(and long forgotten).

rightnow
Mon, Mar-12-12, 15:59
I just can't believe nobody has put this famous image in.

Like McDonald's chicken nuggets? This is "mechanically separated chicken."

http://www.firedocs.com/misc/chicken-goo-for-mcd-nuggets.jpg

PJ

Nancy LC
Mon, Mar-12-12, 20:41
the first ingredient on a package of mexican style chorizo was ... lung. the second was lymph node. i wish i hadn't read that. i used to like chorizo...
Tip to tail, baby! You're eating like your ancestors did. :lol:

Seriously, it's because people are so squeamish that they do stuff like make pink slime and chicken nugget goo to get them to consume perfectly good protein and fat.

pinkclouds
Mon, Mar-12-12, 21:10
I remember my family roasting cow intestines and pigs feet at big family bbqs when I was younger. We are from Argentina and down there they eat all parts and every part and they find a way to make it delicious. Think of it as honoring the animal.

Now pink slime...I'm not sure there is honor in that. :Puke:

tragedian
Tue, Mar-13-12, 02:40
I wonder what it smells like...I can't help it.

Merpig
Tue, Mar-13-12, 07:12
I just can't believe nobody has put this famous image in. :lol: Yeah, when I saw the subject line on this one I really expected this image to be the very first thing I saw!

I was at the asian grocery store with my Chinese daughter-in-law last Friday, and their butcher's section was nothing like we see in our mainstream markets. It had packaged items like pigs' uterus, pigs' spleen - certainly every part of the pig from squeal to tail. Okay, I admit some of it made me squeamish, :D

She's commented more than once that the Chinese folks think Americans are crazy with the way they eat chicken - preferring the breast - which she says the traditional Chinese folks she knows thinks is the most useless part of the chicken because the meat is too lean - fit only for animal food, and they prefer the fattier parts.

Nancy LC
Tue, Mar-13-12, 08:17
I love going to Asian food stores. :)

ICDogg
Tue, Mar-13-12, 08:42
I love going to Asian food stores. :)

Same here. I go to Assi Plaza, a giant Asian supermarket nearby. Love the place. Love the fish and produce especially. Not interested in the duck feet and pig snouts though.

Nancy LC
Tue, Mar-13-12, 08:48
Duck's feet might make a really good broth.

KarenJ
Tue, Mar-13-12, 08:57
Off topic, but not really. My dad gave a loan to a Chinese family to open a restaurant in NYC. They then invited our whole family to come and eat there. Our family has been talking about that meal for decades... because they served EVERYTHING! Whole animals, and lots of booze. It was one thing to learn what "drunk" meant, but it was a whole nother thing to learn what "tip to tail" meant! Greatest meal ever. :)

PilotGal
Tue, Mar-13-12, 09:18
they have GOT to be full of the odd ear, snout, or other such protrusion.......offal doesn't bother me since that was food, before the butcher started cutting specialty cuts..
it's the ammonia and chemicals they put the Pink Slime through that has completely turned me off...

ICDogg
Tue, Mar-13-12, 12:26
Duck's feet might make a really good broth.

I wouldn't object to it if used for that. I think my grandmother used to use chicken feet in a broth come to think of it.

ICDogg
Tue, Mar-13-12, 12:32
offal doesn't bother me since that was food, before the butcher started cutting specialty cuts..
it's the ammonia and chemicals they put the Pink Slime through that has completely turned me off...

It may well be that the antimicrobials added to the pink slime may be preventing outbreaks of e coli. Who knows. I don't want to eat any beef with pink slime in it but considering the way it must be handled sometimes, it might actually wind up being safer.

askwhy456
Tue, Mar-13-12, 13:48
I stopped at a local grocery store (small town) last night and noticed a sign in their meat department stating that they do no use any added substances in their meat products. I suspect they have already been hit up repeatedly with questions. Of course it is because we all suspected it due to the 'quality' of their meat!

joel381
Tue, Mar-13-12, 15:35
Now when I cook ground beef, the pink slime comes to mind. How many pounds per year of that stuff is consumed?
That mechanically separated chicken photo is a treat too, looks like foam. Great Stuff

sexym2
Tue, Mar-13-12, 16:47
Some one asked "what happens to the ground meat in the grinder?" Its not really lost, but it stays in the machine and they don't clean it out and give you the remainder thats in the grinder that doesn't come out. It takes force from meat being shoved through to shove the ground meat out. So, without force, some meat stays insidee the grinder, hence, the loss. If I were to have meat ground up at the butchers, I'd make sure they did a lot at once, so, less per pound would be loss.

Whofan
Tue, Mar-13-12, 17:13
:Puke: Why oh why did I find this thread tonight AFTER I just ate ground beef for dinner. And to make it worse, I wandered around the grocery store trying to decide what would be quick and easy. It was between cheap, factory farmed ground beef or opening a can of wild salmon. I don't know what possessed me to make that choice and now I still have half the beef left over for lunch tomorrow. :Puke:

DAGrant
Tue, Mar-13-12, 17:18
Yeah, I went by the meat counter at Walmart and all the ground beef looked suspiciously light pink to me. I didn't buy any.

Going to buy it at the local Giant Eagle, they grind their beef in house.

Nancy LC
Tue, Mar-13-12, 17:33
Some one asked "what happens to the ground meat in the grinder?" Its not really lost, but it stays in the machine and they don't clean it out and give you the remainder thats in the grinder that doesn't come out. It takes force from meat being shoved through to shove the ground meat out. So, without force, some meat stays insidee the grinder, hence, the loss. If I were to have meat ground up at the butchers, I'd make sure they did a lot at once, so, less per pound would be loss.
But you'll get whatever meat was left from the last grind, right?

mike_d
Mon, Mar-26-12, 11:27
http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/apnewsbreak-pink-slime-maker-halts-plants-16003919About 200 employees at each of the three plants will get full salary and benefits for 60 days during the suspension, Letch said. The plant in Amarillo produced about 200,000 pounds a day, while the Kansas and Iowa plants each produced about 350,000 pounds a day.Now if they could expose the surreptitious practice of "enhancing" all our meats at the stores with various brine solutions!

Demi
Mon, Mar-26-12, 23:09
From Spiked
London, UK
26 March, 2012

Lies, damned lies and ‘pink slime’

It’s not scare stories about ground beef but the anti-industrial prejudices of foodies that should spoil your appetite.

I want the job of senior medical correspondent at CNN. If Elizabeth Cohen’s performance in a recent studio discussion about ground beef was anything to go by, the job involves pulling faces and saying ‘yuk’ while providing almost no worthwhile information whatsoever. I reckon I could do that - I bet CNN pays well, too - but I also hope viewers might be a bit more demanding.

Cohen’s gurning was in response to the decision by US supermarket chain Safeway to stop selling ground beef containing a product now widely labelled as ‘pink slime’. Safeway are following in the footsteps of other big names like McDonald’s in removing this form of meat from what they sell. What is this evil stuff and why is everybody ditching it now?

The manufacturers, Beef Products Inc (BPI) of South Dakota, prefer to call it boneless lean beef trimmings. BPI has pulled off a smart trick: making something deemed to be unusable for food into a safe and nutritious product. When a side of beef is being processed, as much of the meat as possible is cut off. However, some of the meat is just too tricky to separate by hand from fatty tissue, so it ends up being sent off for pet food or other uses. That’s a waste.

BPI found a way to separate this meat from the fat by warming the trimmings up then spinning them in centrifuges. This produces by beef fat and a product similar to ground beef, though the particles that come out are smaller so it has a different texture. It doesn’t bear much resemblance to ‘slime’. Then, to ensure it is 100 per cent safe - the parts of the animal used seem to be more prone to containing harmful bacteria than those normally used for ground beef - the company treats the trimmings with ammonium hydroxide gas.

Ammonium hydroxide occurs naturally in the human body (and in beef) and is used in a variety of food products. The company argues that in a typical cheeseburger, there is no more ammonium hydroxide in the beef than there is in the bun - and considerably less than is found in the cheese. Very small amounts of ammonium hydroxide - measured in parts per million - are sufficient to make the beef a hostile environment for bugs like E. Coli and salmonella. The trick is to apply enough ammonium hydroxide to the product to kill bacteria without imparting an alkaline taste.

Lean beef trimmings are not used on their own, but are mixed with a much bigger quantity of ground beef to create burgers. Currently, the maximum level of trimmings allowed in products for schools is 15 per cent. The product has been popular both with public institutions and with big companies. It is cheap and nutritious and seems to be at least as safe as ground beef from other sources. This previously unused meat helps to keep costs down and reduces food waste. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) not only approves the product, but buys large quantities of it. So, what’s the problem?

I first came across BPI when it featured in Robert Kenner’s Oscar-nominated documentary, Food Inc. (see a review here). BPI was clearly not worried about its product; the company let Kenner film extensively inside one of its plants. The boss of BPI, Eldon Roth, even took great pleasure in explaining the process of making lean beef trimmings and how he had personally worked on innovations that made sure it was safe to eat. But Kenner added some discordant music - and some judicious shot selection - to make what was innocent appear creepy.

In December 2009, the New York Times carried a long feature calling into question the safety of lean beef trimmings. The process by which lean beef trimmings are produced had been deemed so safe by the USDA that the company was excluded from routine testing of hamburger meat. But the article’s author, Michael Moss, pointed to tests undertaken by school-lunch officials, which had found E. Coli contamination in BPI products. However, the article also noted that ‘no outbreak has been tied to Beef Products’.

In passing, Moss quoted a private email by a USDA microbiologist, Gerald Zirnstein, who labelled lean beef trimmings as ‘pink slime’, the term now routinely used to describe lean beef trimmings. But it seems the real populariser of the term was our old friend, celebrity chef Jamie Oliver. In an astonishing segment for his US TV show, Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution, he shows parents how he ‘imagines’ that ‘pink slime’ is made. This includes using a washing machine to demonstrate how the meat is separated and then pouring what looks like bleach over ground beef, as if that bore any resemblance to BPI’s process or product. ‘Basically, we’re taking a product that would be sold at the cheapest form for dogs and after this process we can give it to humans’, he said. Cue pictures of shocked parents and children.

Thus, this whole storm about lean beef trimmings has been largely the product of a scaremongering TV item that paraded the host’s complete ignorance on the subject while treating with reverence the off-the-cuff opinion of a single USDA employee in an email 10 years ago.

The show may not have had many viewers - it was shunted out of its original ABC slot to be replaced by re-runs of Dancing With the Stars - but it seemed to have an impact: one by one, big US chains like Burger King and Taco Bell stopped using ammonium hydroxide-treated products. In January, McDonald’s announced that it had removed BPI products from it’s burgers. That’s hardly surprising: the cost savings will seem a minor compensation for these firms when set against the potential damage to their reputations that this fuss has created. Yet the USDA has recently reaffirmed that BPI products are safe and they are still widely used in US schools, but the department has now agreed to allow schools to opt out of using products containing lean beef trimmings.

The case of ‘pink slime’ matters for a number of reasons. Firstly, because while science can never be the final arbiter of political decision-making, we should at least test claims against the evidence. And the evidence is that there is little reason to be fearful about lean beef trimmings. Like any meat product that’s not prime steak, if you want to be 100 per cent sure of avoiding illness, you should cook it thoroughly. Doing so will certainly kill any E.Coli and salmonella. But in terms of nutrition and safety, lean beef trimmings compare well with regular ground beef. To say otherwise is at best ignorant, at worst downright untrue. The habit of some websites and news media in illustrating their stories about ‘pink slime’ with a picture of something pink and slimy - rather than a picture of lean beef trimmings - only exacerbates this misleading impression.

Secondly, we should have an equality of scepticism. We should take any company’s claims with a pinch of salt and check things out for ourselves - but we should be wary of claims made by food campaigners, too. From the debate so far, you might be forgiven for believing that lean beef trimmings were some unique and potent danger to our health. But there’s no evidence that anyone has ever been made ill by them.

On the other hand, there is a product beloved of many eco-foodies, one that is definitely not the product of some mass manufacturing process but is a known risk for E.Coli: raw milk. Some balance is required: unpasteurised milk is, by and large, safe to drink. Nonetheless, there have been plenty of cases of food poisoning directly linked to raw milk in recent years. The difference is that raw milk from mom-and-pop farms presses all the right buttons for those who love ‘natural’ food, while BPI’s process - with its huge scale and industrial methods - is frowned upon.

In other words, the myth of ‘pink slime’ is just the latest symptom of an anti-industrial prejudice among foodies. That’s a problem because industrial methods and economies of scale have allowed us to eat more cheaply and with better quality than ever before. Lean beef trimmings allow perfectly good food to be eaten by human beings instead of being wasted on animals.

Food campaigners often bemoan the way that big food companies will present their products as ‘farm fresh’ or ‘natural’ when they are actually produced on an industrial scale. But that is only a reflection of just how deep-seated these prejudices about food - constantly promoted by foodies - really are. The really misleading idea is that there is any benefit to returning to small-scale, organic, eco-friendly food production. Food production stopped being ‘natural’ when we invented agriculture 10,000 years ago.

Sadly, it seems that many of those willing to bash industrialised food production are prepared to distort the facts in order to promote their case. There’s a word for people like that: slime.http://www.spiked-online.com/index.php/site/article/12277/

RubySpider
Tue, Mar-27-12, 03:45
Oh, Demi, that reminded me of the "Thank you for Smoking" movie! I loved that movie!! Gotta love a good spin artist! :D

aj_cohn
Tue, Mar-27-12, 08:15
While Lyons is right to denounce the CNN reporter's performance, he's wrong to defend industrial meat production. On balance. Industrial meat is bad for people and the environment. For example, in 2008, Westland/Hallmark agreed to recall 143 million pounds of potentially contaminated ground beef after an undercover video showed downer cows being dragged by forklift into a slaughterhouse. If Lyons had viewed the treatment of battery chickens, either first-hand or via viewing "Food, Inc.", he would probably swear off factory-raised chickens for good. And if Lyons had bothered to do a quick Google search on the pollution caused by the waste lagoons of industrial pig farming, he couldn't possibly embrace the business.

There's no doubt that the livestock system has gone horribly wrong. In the book Meat: A Benign Extravagance, Simon Fairlie provides a thorough analysis of industrial livestock practices. Fairlie describes the feedlot beef industry (in which animals are kept in pens) in the US as "one of the biggest ecological cock-ups in modern history". It pumps grain and forage from irrigated pastures into the farm animal species least able to process them efficiently, to produce beef fatty enough for hamburger production. Cattle are excellent converters of grass but terrible converters of concentrated feed.

Nor is humane animal husbandry an elitist practice. Allan Savory, for example, is currently overseeing efforts to reclaim African desert through cattle grazing as part of an integrated livestock management to improve the nutrition of millions of people and restore the environment. If we stopped stuffing of animals with grain to boost meat and milk consumption (mostly in the rich nations), we would create an increase in available food which could support 1.3 billion people.

Lyons should stop frothing at the mouth and start researching the topics he writes about.

Whofan
Tue, Mar-27-12, 11:25
Well said, AJ.

Karhys
Tue, Mar-27-12, 21:05
I was formulating a response to Lyons' article even as I read it, and then I read your reply, AJ. You said everything I wanted to say, and better. :)

KarenJ
Tue, Mar-27-12, 22:17
Brilliant post, AJ... But:

Nor is humane animal husbandry an elitist practice. Allan Savory, for example, is currently overseeing efforts to reclaim African desert through cattle grazing as part of an integrated livestock management to improve the nutrition of millions of people and restore the environment. If we stopped stuffing of animals with grain to boost meat and milk consumption (mostly in the rich nations), we would create an increase in available food which could support 1.3 billion people.

In the USA, it seems that the only people doing "humane animal husbandry" are branded "REDNECK", as if they're stupid, dumb, and backwoods. Quite the opposite in my opinion. Pretty sad.

Brinethery
Tue, Mar-27-12, 22:23
Some one asked "what happens to the ground meat in the grinder?" Its not really lost, but it stays in the machine and they don't clean it out and give you the remainder thats in the grinder that doesn't come out. It takes force from meat being shoved through to shove the ground meat out. So, without force, some meat stays insidee the grinder, hence, the loss. If I were to have meat ground up at the butchers, I'd make sure they did a lot at once, so, less per pound would be loss.

Can you just ask them to weigh the meat after grinding? It's only fair to you, the customer to get the total weight you paid for.

Blackstone
Tue, Mar-27-12, 22:31
And this is why I am now buying my beef from a neighbor..grass fed, well taken care of animals. Going with local dairy as well. You just can't trust anything these days.

aj_cohn
Wed, Mar-28-12, 08:43
Thanks for the compliments, people, but I must give credit where it's due. I copied parts of my response from George Monbiot's 2010 essay (http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2010/sep/06/meat-production-veganism-deforestation) in the Guardian. There, he publicly gave up his veganism and related activism.

Demi
Thu, Apr-05-12, 08:08
From The Telegraph
London, UK
5 April, 2012

End of cheap burgers and pies as meat removal process banned by Europe

The price of beef burgers and pies is due to rise after a technique used in the UK to remove scraps of meat from animal bones was banned by the European Commission.

The UK's Food Standards Agency (FSA) said it had agreed to the moratorium but stressed there was no evidence of any risk to human health from eating cow and sheep meat produced from the low-pressure 'Desinewed Meat' (DSM) removal technique.

The FSA said a "very small part" of the UK's meat processing industry used the DSM technique to remove meat from animal bones, with the product closely resembling minced meat.

The FSA said the DSM process had been used in the UK since the mid 1990s, and local producers had reported that DSM meat was also exported by other EU countries such as Germany, Holland and Spain.

The agency said in a statement: "The FSA is clear that there is no evidence of any risk to human health from eating meat produced from the low-pressure DSM technique. There is no greater risk from eating this sort of produce than any other piece of meat or meat product. The EU Commission has informed us today they do not consider this to be an identified public health concern."

The agency said the European Commission had decided that DSM did not comply with EU single market legislation and had therefore required the UK to impose a moratorium on producing meat products from the bones of cows and sheep using DSM by the end of April.

The FSA added: "If the UK were not to comply with the Commission's ruling it would risk a ban on the export of UK meat products which would have a devastating impact on the UK food industry."

The DSM process can still be used to remove meat from poultry and pigs but must now be classed and specifically labelled as 'Mechanically Separated Meat' (MSM), and not simply as 'meat'.

The desinewed meat at the centre of the ban is made from the flesh left on bones after slaughtering.

Rather than throw the remnants of meat away, they are separate from the bone mechanically. It is done under low pressure, so that the mincemeat still has texture.

A different high-pressure technique is used to create a reconstituted, paste-like mechanically separated meat. This process has been banned in lamb and beef because it has been linked to diseases such as BSE. The EC has decided the two techniques are essentially the same.

The British Meat Processors Association (BMPA) condemned the EC's moratorium as a "criminal waste of a valuable product" which would have "enormous implications" for producers, food manufacturers and some consumers.

BMPA director Stephen Rossides said: "While acceding to the Commission's demands, the Government and we hold that current practice in the UK is lawful. This product is not MSM (mechanically separated meat). It is meat, and there are no food safety concerns in its usage.

"This is a criminal waste of a valuable product at a time of a shortage of proteins, and when we are being urged to reduce food wastage. Common sense has gone out of the window."

The BMPA said the requirement to label products as 'mechanically separated meat' would substantially reduce its usage and value, and there would be costs for disposing of unwanted product.

It added that food products would have to be reformulated and relabelled at additional cost, and warned that the price to consumers would increase "with a particularly unwelcome impact on less well-off households, since this product is widely used in value lines".

It estimated the total cost of related job losses and other impacts to be in the area of £200 million.

Mr Rossides added: "The market implications of having to bow down to the Commission are huge. We look to the UK Government to continue to defend the UK's legal interpretation and established practice. All this has happened at break-neck speed. The industry must be given more time to adjust to any change in requirements and market circumstances in a controlled and properly managed way in order to minimise market disruption and financial damage."

The Food and Drink Federation's (FDF) director of food safety and science Barbara Gallani said: "We would like to stress that this is a technical issue around the interpretation of the definition of mechanically separated meat. We do not agree with the Commission's interpretation as MSM and DSM are two very different products and research by Which? in 2011 confirmed that consumers clearly view DSM as distinct from MSM.

"Food manufacturers will continue to liaise with FSA officials to understand the impact of the Commission's request to revise the UK interpretation of the definition of MSM to include desinewed meat (DSM).

"FDF supports a pragmatic approach to the required changes, including a reasonable timeframe for the transition, to avoid disproportionate measures that could lead to meat being wasted, causing a significant impact on the environment and on the price and availability of meat raw material."

The FSA said products using meat extracted by the DSM process included sausages, pies, burgers and reformed poultry products like chicken shapes.

FSA chief executive Tim Smith told reporters that the move by the European Commission had been unexpectedly "quick" but he understood its desire to harmonise processes across member states.

He hoped that eventually it could be shown that the change was not necessary.

He said: "We've been through a lengthy process of communication with the Commission, during which time the Commission has tried to standardise and harmonise across all member states. What they've done today might appear a little quick, in asking us to impose the moratorium, but though the pace may be surprising, the outcome is not."

He said the harmonisation would come to affect every member state.

"We happen to have come up first. What they will now do, in my opinion, is say, 'this is what we've done in the UK, you need to follow suit, and we will be looking for how you characterise this meat in your country'."

Asked if he expected that to be a rapid process, he said: "Yes. We will be making a fuss if they don't."

He said there was no risk attached to the process.

"The science and evidence base needs to be developed to prove our point."

And asked if he hoped that the change could be overturned, he said: "I am confident that over time we will be able to marshal our arguments with the other member states to achieve that objective."

He said the move had come "unexpectedly".

"We talk to consumer bodies, science and evidence gatherers, we didn't see any compelling reason to do anything other than keep talking."

A Which? spokeswoman said: "Our research into consumer attitudes on the labelling of meat products found that while people thought desinewed meat (DSM) was distinct from mechanically separated meat (MSM), they also wanted to see it clearly identified in the list of ingredients.

"We believe there should be clear labelling of food to allow shoppers to make an informed choice." http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/foodanddrinknews/9187513/End-of-cheap-burgers-and-pies-as-meat-removal-process-banned-by-Europe.html

PilotGal
Thu, Apr-05-12, 08:22
yup.. this subject matter has caused meat processing plants in the states to file bankruptcy and lay off thousands of employees.

Ron_Mocci
Fri, Apr-06-12, 00:27
Pilotgal ... it don't have to be that way , just saying think what a great dog food that would make ! Way better then the sh*t they are pumping to our pets :)

Demi
Fri, Apr-06-12, 00:48
From BBC News
London, UK
6 April, 2012

Could "pink slime" be rebranded?

Three out of the four US factories making "lean beef trimmings" are to be shut down following a public outcry. Is "pink slime" - as critics call it - finished or could it be relaunched under a new name?

The look on shoppers' faces as Jamie Oliver sloshed ammonia into a bowl of what he calls "pink slime" said it all.

They were horrified. They appeared to have no idea that the burgers they had been buying all these years contained anything other than prime cuts of beef.

But here was a TV chef showing them, in a 2011 edition of his US show Jamie's Food Revolution, how their burgers are bulked out by meat that in previous decades would have been used for dog food, and is only made fit for human consumption by being treated with household bleach.

Job losses

The decision by major US supermarkets, fast food restaurants - and some public schools - to stop using food that contains Lean Finely Textured Beef, to give "pink slime" its official name, is a victory for Oliver and online campaigners who railed against it.

But the resulting loss of 850 meat processing jobs, at a time when America is suffering high unemployment, has angered many - and turned Jamie Oliver into a hate figure on some message boards.

He probably did more than anybody to bring "pink slime" to mainstream attention in the US, although the social media campaign to kill it off did not take off until last month, when ABC World News with Diane Sawyer ran an expose.

The US Department of Agriculture has now allowed schools to remove products containing "pink slime" from their cafeteria menus after Texan blogger Bettina Elias Siegel gathered more than 200,000 online signatures in nine days.

For the meat processing industry, it has been a bruising lesson in public relations and transparency in the age of social media.

Industry fight-back

It might also be the first example of a food ingredient being withdrawn not because of any safety fears, but because people have decided it sounds disgusting.

Industry chiefs are furious about what they see as a media-led smear campaign against a product that has been used in the US since the early 1990s and meets federal food safety standards.

Earlier this week, they launched a fight back - unveiling a new slogan "Dude, it's beef" and enlisting the help of Texas governor and former presidential candidate Rick Perry, who dutifully chowed down on a burger containing the stuff on a visit to a processing plant in South Sioux City, Nebraska.

To British eyes, this stunt contains echoes of Conservative government minister John Gummer feeding his young daughter a beefburger, in front of the TV news cameras, at the height of the "mad cow disease" controversy in 1990.

But unlike the BSE outbreak no-one is seriously suggesting "pink slime" is dangerous - or even that burgers containing it are significantly less tasty or nutritious than other beef products.

The industry has launched a website, beefisbeef.com, to emphasise this - although Gary Martin, president of brand-naming consultants Gary Martin Group, believes they are missing the point.

"Who cares whether it's 100% beef and who cares whether it's lacking bacteria, if it's something that you find disgusting?" he says.

Tragedy

He describes what has happened to the company driven out of business by the "pink slime" controversy as a tragedy.

But he says it was caused, in part, by the lack of a registered brand name for their main product.

"They didn't brand themselves so someone else did," he explains.

Lean beef trimmings have never marketed to the public as a product in their own right so it's doubtful the companies making them would have thought that they needed a brand name.

But, says Martin, if they had been thinking ahead, they might have called the product something consumer-friendly like "Pro-leana".

It might not have prevented the media backlash, but it might have helped them deal with it better, he argues.

Consumer anger

But, like most experts, he believes it is far too late to rebrand the product now, as it would be seen as a marketing "ploy", which would further inflame consumer anger.

"Pink slime" is, in any case, a far more powerful brand name than anything the industry could come up with.

"It is a powerful image. To try to replace that image with something else might be tough," says EJ Schultz, a food marketing writer with Advertising Age magazine.

He believes consumer anger has been driven by a lack of transparency.

"People are wondering 'why didn't I know about this before? Why wasn't this labelled?' People want everything labelled these days."

Jason Karpf, who teaches public relations and marketing, also believes the food industry has got a lot to learn about modern consumers.

He says: "The heightened nature of consumer awareness means that food manufacturers must look at every component of their end user product and imagine public reaction to it. Predict and prepare for public reaction."

The next 'pink slime'?

Meat processors have been adding beef scraps to burgers and other products since the 1970s to keep costs down - but they will now have to come with a replacement "that can withstand lay person scrutiny," says Mr Karpf.

"They are going to have to think about the product itself before they try to come up with a name, and a campaign, that - dare I say - the public will swallow."

He sees parallels with High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) - a substance added to food for more than 30 years, but which recent studies have linked to obesity.

The makers of HFCS, which is derived from a chemical process, rebranded it as "corn sugar" - but they are locked in a legal battle with the sugar industry over the use of the term.

"In decades past, High Fructose Corn Syrup was just an ingredient on the back label if people chose to read it" says Mr Karpf.

"It is under a spotlight. Lean Finely Textured Beef was something the public was unaware of until the great increase in media and social media gave it prominence."

But while HFCS may yet have a future, "pink slime" does not, he argues.

Others are not so sure. EJ Shultz believes food containing lean beef trimmings could, when properly labelled, become a low-cost alternative for cash-strapped beef lovers.

Branding consultant Denise Lee Yohn believes that for the companies involved, it might just be a case of waiting for the fuss to die down.

Social media is a powerful consumer advocacy tool but the groundswell of anger generated by it can also be short-lived, she argues.

"If they can wait it out, and let the hype die down, about six months from now no-one will think anything of it and they can come back with the product."

Pink slime
Lean Finely Textured Beef is made from fatty beef carcass off-cuts
It is heated and spun in a centrifuge to remove most of the fat
It is then exposed to ammonium hydroxide gas to kill bacteria such as E. coli and salmonella
It has been added to burgers and other beef products in the US since the early 1990s to keep costs down
The term "pink slime" was coined in 2002 by former US government scientist-turned whistleblower Gerald Zirnstein
It was found in 70% of ground beef in US stores
The US Department of Agriculture allowed schools to remove products containing "pink slime" after an online petition
Supermarkets and fast food outlets also joined in the boycott
The beef industry claims it would have to kill an extra 1.5 million cattle a year to make up the "pink slime" shortfall
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-17615456