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  #1   ^
Old Tue, Aug-07-18, 02:59
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default Is the Paleo Diet Right for You?

Quote:
From The New York Times
August 6, 2018

Is the Paleo Diet Right for You?

In the Paleo era, people ran around all day and rarely lived past 40, so their risk of developing the so-called diseases of civilization is unknown.

Jane E Brody


It seems these days that every third person I meet is either already on the “Paleo” diet or planning to try it. Their goals are either weight loss or better health, but certainly not to save the planet.

The main premise of the Paleo diet: If the cave men didn’t eat it, you shouldn’t either. But is this sound nutritional advice?
Let’s start with three basic facts:

1. There is no such thing as “a” Paleo diet. The Paleolithic era lasted 2.5 million years and involved different and continually evolving populations with a wide dietary range determined by climate, geography, season and availability.

2. Human beings today and the composition of the foods they eat are not the same as they were in Paleo time. Genetic changes and breeding have resulted in very different organisms for both.

3. There have been no studies of large groups of people who have followed the currently popular versions of the Paleo diet for decades to assess their long-term health effects.

Keep in mind that the life expectancy of people before the advent of agriculture 15,000 years ago rarely reached or exceeded 40, so their risk of developing the so-called diseases of civilization is unknown.

There is one basic premise of the Paleo diet that could benefit everyone’s health: Avoid all foods that are packaged and processed. That said, consider a daily menu of 2,200 calories suggested in a popular book on how to eat like a cave man.

Breakfast: 12 oz. broiled salmon, 1-3/4 cups cantaloupe

Lunch: 3 oz. broiled lean pork, 4-1/2 cups salad dressed only with lemon juice.

Dinner: 8 oz. lean sirloin tip roast, 3 cups steamed broccoli, 4-1/2 cups salad (again, no oil, though some versions of the diet include olive oil), 1 cup strawberries.

Snacks: ½ orange, ¾ cup carrots, 1 cup celery.

With so many vegetables and fruits, the diet does contain plenty of fiber and most essential vitamins and minerals. Despite a few serious nutritional deficiencies like calcium and vitamin D from the lack of dairy foods spurned by Paleo enthusiasts, it sounds healthy enough, as long as your kidneys can handle so much protein.

But is it practical? How many people trying to get the kids off to school in the morning and themselves ready for work will take the time to broil salmon? What will they do when they dine out, especially in someone else’s home? And most important of all, can they stay on the diet indefinitely and live happily without a piece of bread, cracker or, heaven forfend, a serving of ice cream?

And not all Paleolithic diets are equally nourishing. Those who choose the ancestors of the Inuits as their guide would be eating mostly meats and seafood and few if any fruits and vegetables, which grow poorly in the Arctic. As Marlene Zuk, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Minnesota and author of “Paleofantasy,” told Nutrition Action three years ago, the fact that people like the Inuits can adapt to a diet with little plant food “doesn’t mean they should live that way if they have a choice.”

I also wonder whether Paleo diners faced with currently available choices will stick to lean animal foods (grass-fed meats, skinless poultry, etc.), or would they be tempted to choose more succulent, fattier, more caloric cuts like brisket, burgers and pork ribs. Even worse, they might select processed meats like bacon (allowed on some Paleo diet lists) and sausages that have been linked to an increased risk of cancer and heart disease. Would they succumb to using butter and salt to enhance the flavor of steamed vegetables?

As I see it, a Mediterranean-style diet, now promoted by most dietitians and researchers who study the effects of what we eat, is far easier to incorporate into modern lives with minimal risk to lasting health. It is also better balanced nutritionally and a whole lot tastier.

The Mediterranean diet features only small portions of animal foods and depends more on plant proteins like beans and peas. It includes olive oil and other monounsaturated fats. It is more varied, less expensive, less taxing on the environment, and easier to fit into the demands of life as it is lived today.

Several short-term studies among small groups of people (often with no control groups) suggest that the Paleo diet is more effective than the Mediterranean approach at promoting weight loss and reducing risk factors for Type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. Still, my vote goes for the more flexible and far more thoroughly researched Mediterranean diet.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/06/...a-cave-man.html
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  #2   ^
Old Tue, Aug-07-18, 09:59
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bluesinger bluesinger is offline
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I've been doing research into this, but have come to the conclusion that what Paleo eating proscribes is basically the way I eat: LCHF+IF.

Love https://www.nerdfitness.com/free-resources/ as a Paleo resource. It's a "no excuses" fount of knowledge. Very helpful.
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  #3   ^
Old Tue, Aug-07-18, 11:22
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barb712 barb712 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesinger
I've been doing research into this, but have come to the conclusion that what Paleo eating proscribes is basically the way I eat: LCHF+IF.

Love https://www.nerdfitness.com/free-resources/ as a Paleo resource. It's a "no excuses" fount of knowledge. Very helpful.


That's very true! Leaning more toward simple, natural, unprocessed foods.
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  #4   ^
Old Tue, Aug-07-18, 12:35
Zei Zei is offline
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Quote:
I also wonder whether Paleo diners faced with currently available choices will stick to lean animal foods (grass-fed meats, skinless poultry, etc.), or would they be tempted to choose more succulent, fattier, more caloric cuts like brisket, burgers and pork ribs. Even worse, they might select processed meats like bacon (allowed on some Paleo diet lists) and sausages that have been linked to an increased risk of cancer and heart disease. Would they succumb to using butter and salt to enhance the flavor of steamed vegetables?

Other than the processed sausage type stuff, I would certainly hope they eat the higher fat meats, salt and perhaps butter! I think this author is still sold on the waning low-fat era and not, so far as I can see, likely to change her opinion. The example menu with lean fish, pork, beef and vegetables/fruit is far too low in fat to be healthy IMO.
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  #5   ^
Old Tue, Aug-07-18, 12:47
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barb712 barb712 is offline
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In Loren Cordain's original book, The Paleo Diet, he emphasized lean meats throughout, so that's how it was originally set forth. Over recent years, though, he endorses the reasonable enjoyment of "good" fat.
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  #6   ^
Old Tue, Aug-07-18, 14:04
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bluesinger bluesinger is offline
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They're still trying to control us with terms like "healthy fats." The BS never ends. I don't know about you, but my fat intake is self regulating. My body knows when I've had enough fat and I choose my next meal accordingly.

I'll admit that some oils are no longer allowed in my house, but other than those, fats are my friend.
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  #7   ^
Old Tue, Aug-07-18, 17:05
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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The "flexible and thoroughly researched Mediterranean Diet" shows an interesting admission in the abstract:
Quote:
"Participants received quarterly educational sessions and, depending on group assignment, free provision of extra-virgin olive oil, mixed nuts, or small nonfood gifts. The primary end point was a major cardiovascular event (myocardial infarction, stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes). After a median follow-up of 4.8 years, the trial was stopped on the basis of a prespecified interim analysis. In 2013, we reported the results for the primary end point in the Journal. We subsequently identified protocol deviations, including enrollment of household members without randomization, assignment to a study group without randomization of some participants at 1 of 11 study sites, and apparent inconsistent use of randomization tables at another site. We have withdrawn our previously published report and now report revised effect estimates based on analyses that do not rely exclusively on the assumption that all the participants were randomly assigned."
So, why bother? This was not a rigorous RCT, this was an "educate and have faith" effort that shouldn't be considered research. How dependable are the responses from the participants, the findings?

The Mediterranean Diet is a nebulous term. It can be anything consumed from the Mediterranean region. That's a broad swath of food candidates both healthy and not. The Paleo Diet is more predictable but not less flexible. Brody's low fat, vegetarian-favoring agenda is hardly transparent. Amazing what is passed off as health pablum these days . . .
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  #8   ^
Old Tue, Aug-07-18, 19:49
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Is she for real???

She wants evidence based data, but others have pointed out how the mediterranian diet is based on flawed data.

And what of the SAD??? What is the findings on that via a study? I bet there is not a study. Oh wait, we are the guinea pigs and the study is on going.

Sorry, I have become very jaded.
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  #9   ^
Old Tue, Aug-07-18, 19:57
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bluesinger bluesinger is offline
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The article, like so many, is BS. But Paleo is about what our ancestors ate before farming, which is 99% of the time humans have been on the planet. They ate meat and fat, fish, birds and eggs, nuts, seeds, roots and berries with long spaces where there was no food. That's basically the way we eat: LCHF+IF.

Paleo=LCHF+IF.
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  #10   ^
Old Tue, Aug-07-18, 20:26
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesinger
The article, like so many, is BS. But Paleo is about what our ancestors ate before farming, which is 99% of the time humans have been on the planet. They ate meat and fat, fish, birds and eggs, nuts, seeds, roots and berries with long spaces where there was no food. That's basically the way we eat: LCHF+IF.

Paleo=LCHF+IF.



YOu called that right. Never seen anyone point out the lean times. Lots of those.

I was out picking grape leaves today thinking how spoiled we all are with a ready well stocked grocery. Then moved on to picking the blackberries, and how aweful a few tasted--yet from the grocery, each one must be tastey.

The peaches are coming along. Maybe enough to dry a few. Hoping the brown rot doesnt move from the nectarines to the peaches. The two nectarine trees are a total loss, and a source of infection for the other peaches.

Yup, limit food sources. Forgotten skills at carefully allotting the supplies to make it thru a year until food is available again.

Ya, lots of fasting in years gone by.
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  #11   ^
Old Wed, Aug-08-18, 02:02
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BillyHW BillyHW is online now
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Did Paleo man really only live until 40? Or is that number just average lifespan brought down by infant mortality?
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  #12   ^
Old Wed, Aug-08-18, 06:08
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillyHW
Did Paleo man really only live until 40? Or is that number just average lifespan brought down by infant mortality?



Unless they've dug up every single body from every single person who lived in that era, then yeah, it's just an average lifespan.



It wouldn't have been just because of infant mortality though - there would have also been lots of women who died in childbirth.



In an era when there were no immunizations to prevent something like tetanus. There was nothing to prevent infection, and no antibiotics to clear up an infection, so a simple cut or chest cold could prove deadly.



Since they hunted for their food, I'm sure it also wasn't always the animal who was brought down - I'm sure there had to be times when an animal brought down one of the hunters.



And on what exactly are they basing the age of the skeletons they've found - The typical bone and teeth conditions that occur in modern day 40 year olds? What is to say that they didn't show any signs of those conditions until they were at least 80?


They're comparing people who ate only what was available locally, and only when it was available locally to modern day people who not only eat a lot of things that the ones in that era never had (grains, sugar), but also have access to everything, every day, all year round. They're comparing people who drive to work, sit at a desk, then stop at the gym for 30 minutes on the way home - to people from an era where people spent all their days walking, running, climbing, lifting, and carrying.
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  #13   ^
Old Wed, Aug-08-18, 07:11
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teaser teaser is offline
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The Paleo(tm) diet is not generally based on the diet of peoples in the "Paleo era." The modern form of this diet as championed by Loren Cordain and others is based on people in the modern era who were still living at a paleolithic level, it looks at the diets and lifestyles that they were living and what sorts of disease outcomes they had.

The lifespans are horribly skewed by infant mortality and infectious disease (largely one and the same). The causes of these outcomes are well-known and carbohydrate deprivation certainly isn't one of them.

[QUOTE]Several short-term studies among small groups of people (often with no control groups) suggest that the Paleo diet is more effective than the Mediterranean approach at promoting weight loss and reducing risk factors for Type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. Still, my vote goes for the more flexible and far more thoroughly researched Mediterranean diet.[/QUOTE]

Too bad it doesn't come down to a vote.

The blue should be followed by a call for more research, not for a vote on a question that she's claiming there isn't enough data to answer.

Also, a low carb or ketogenic diet is probably at this point better-studied than a paleo diet--perhaps making at least some of the fruits and vegetables Brody praises the most controversial part of Paleo. I know years ago, reading Paleo stuff online and then upping my fruit (basically wound up on Atkins plus fruit), I ended up with the highest blood pressure of my life.
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  #14   ^
Old Wed, Aug-08-18, 07:41
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cotonpal cotonpal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
Also, a low carb or ketogenic diet is probably at this point better-studied than a paleo diet--perhaps making at least some of the fruits and vegetables Brody praises the most controversial part of Paleo. I know years ago, reading Paleo stuff online and then upping my fruit (basically wound up on Atkins plus fruit), I ended up with the highest blood pressure of my life.


When I adopted a paleo diet after reading "Neanderthin" by Ray Audette I was already convinced that low carb was the way to go so I ate what I called a low carb paleo diet (no one was talking keto at the time but it was that too). It's the way I still eat about 15 years later.
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  #15   ^
Old Wed, Aug-08-18, 07:48
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cotonpal cotonpal is offline
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Nina Teicholz posted a reply to the Jane Brody article:

Quote:
"Full disclosure" by Ms. Brody should include the fact that she has promoted the Mediterranean diet for decades now and has staked her career on a lower-fat, high-carb diet that is the antithesis of the paleo diet.

Are there long-term clinical trials on the paleo diet? No, but are there long-term clinical trials on the Med diet? Only one, and that one was recently retracted/republished in a way that left quite a few scientists questioning its basic validity. Are there any long-term trials of the low-fat diet that Brody has long promoted? Yes, and they show that the low-fat diet is utterly ineffective for combatting obesity, T2 diabetes, heart disease or any kind of cancer. Thus, the diet that Brody defends is supported by virtually no long-term rigorous (clinical trial) evidence. Why hold the paleo diet to a higher standard than the one she defends?

Brody objects that it's hard to broil salmon for bfast. Agreed. How about bacon and eggs? Modern-day paleo dieters don't need to hunt all day long; we have supermarkets. Brody quotes paleo-critic Zuk saying humans can now digest starches/sugars. Yes, but does that means they make us healthy? And why does Brody not quote any paleo-supporters? That isn't balanced journalism.

Brody prefers the Med diet. No problem. But should we all be Mediterranean like Brody? This one-size (MY size)-fits all approach is outdated+ paternalistic. It's time to be more open-minded about the diet--and reflect the realities of the science.
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