Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low Carb Health & Technical Forums > General Health
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Tue, Jul-03-18, 16:00
Mayflowers's Avatar
Mayflowers Mayflowers is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 538
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 205/165/150 Female 5'6"
BF:35
Progress: 73%
Location: Jersey Girl
Default Diverticulitis

Hi,
I have been doing well on low carb and suddenly I got a very bad flare of diverticulitis. I was wondering if anyone else has this condition and has low carb or keto helped it or made it worse? I'm very concerned about it getting worse on low carb. I did a search of the forums for anyone or any info on the condition and surprisingly no one has posted anything about it.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Tue, Jul-03-18, 16:56
SilverEm SilverEm is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,018
 
Plan: VLC Pastoral
Stats: 137/136/136 Female 67"
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: Maintenance since 2001
Default

Hi, Mayflowers. I hope you are feeling better.

I don't have diverticulitis, but I know several who have had it. Nuts, seeds, spices are the things I know they avoided.
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Tue, Jul-03-18, 20:08
Rosebud's Avatar
Rosebud Rosebud is offline
Forum Moderator
Posts: 23,510
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 235/135/135 Female 5'4
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayflowers
Hi,
I have been doing well on low carb and suddenly I got a very bad flare of diverticulitis. I was wondering if anyone else has this condition and has low carb or keto helped it or made it worse? I'm very concerned about it getting worse on low carb. I did a search of the forums for anyone or any info on the condition and surprisingly no one has posted anything about it.

Hiya Mayflowers,
Yes, I am a fellow diverticulitis sufferer to the point that I keep track in my "diverticulitis diary" of everything that goes into my mouth.

As SilverEm says, nuts and seeds are definitely no nos for me. But we are all completely individual when it comes to this condition. I also can eat very little when it comes to fibre, or it will trigger a flare-up immediately. So much for the gastroenterologist who told me I needed to gradually increase my fibre until I was getting at least 30 grams a day! I really hate doctors who don't listen!
What I am trying to say is that for me it has been a matter of trial and error as to what I can and can't eat and I suspect it may be the same for you.

In many ways low carb has been a life saver for me. If I am eating out, it's no problem to just order a steak and salad and if the salad is mostly crunchy (another of my no nos), just pick out the few leaves I can eat and slide the rest onto DHs plate.
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Tue, Jul-03-18, 20:16
BeachDonna BeachDonna is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 86
 
Plan: no specific plan
Stats: 177/147/147 Female 65 inches
BF:
Progress: 100%
Default

Oh, sorry to hear that you've been hit by my nemesis, diverticulitis! I have a history of that myself. I've never been able to tag any given bout to any specific food. I had several infections in a couple of years and then went two whole years without an episode. It came back in Dec 2016, then two more infections before November 2017. I also had two or three times in the fall where I was sure I was about to have an infection, but going to lots of water, apple juice for a couple of days followed by low residue for a couple of weeks avoided an infection. As a result I spend much of last year eating lots of applesauce, mac-n-cheese, chicken, potatoes (i.e. mostly carbage) and no salads or fresh veg while recovering from bouts and/or trying to avoid new episodes. Dr said next episode I should consider surgery. (Side note: I gained 10 pounds, too.) When I went low carb in February, I decided that if I felt anything coming on I would push extra water and stay low carb, but not do fresh veg or nuts for a bit. I decided that if needed, I would do bone broths, scrambled eggs, homemade chicken soup (no noodles). I figure that even if I eventually wind up having surgery, it will be easier if I weigh less.

I thought maybe a bout was coming on about 6-7 weeks ago (during the romaine lettuce scare, I'd been using iceberg for lettuce wrap sandwiches)...I followed my plan and the next day I was fine...I didn't add back in fresh veg for a few more days and I've avoided iceberg since then (paranoid?).

I believe that for me wheat and sugar are very inflammatory (my joints quit hurting within days of eliminating them!), so I'm hopeful that continuing to stay away from them will help my gut be healthier...I do think my bouts seem to start because of some inflammation that then causes the area around a pocket to swell, trap waste in the pocket and subsequently get infected.

When looking for advice on how to eat with diverticulitis you get two answers. One is for how to eat when you are having an active infection (or feel something coming on); that is low residue: no nuts, no seeds, scrambled eggs, little bits of well cooked meats, potatoes, noodles, etc. The other is when you're well and want to stay that way; that is higher fiber good food. Doctors may or may not tell you to avoid seeds, etc, when you're well, but the current thinking is that there is not a need to avoid such things.

I've read where doctors who have performed emergency surgery for diver are asked what they found in the infected pouches and they answer "poop", i.e. nothing specific. The bigger deal is to avoid constipation as often it seems to be the first domino in the cascade of events that lead to an infection.

I hope this helps. I hope you're already feeling better.
Reply With Quote
  #5   ^
Old Tue, Jul-03-18, 21:27
DelaneyLC's Avatar
DelaneyLC DelaneyLC is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,404
 
Plan: Aí72
Stats: 188/143/144 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 102%
Location: NV
Default

I have it. I had a severe case when I first started LC in 2014 that sent me to the ER. Now when I feel it coming on I stop eating and fast for awhile. I havenít had to go back to the ER for it since. I think itís helped a lot to stay away from sugar and grains with this WOE.

I eat a lot less now than when I first started eating LC. I think the amount I ate at first probably brought on my infection. I stay away from nuts.

Last edited by DelaneyLC : Tue, Jul-03-18 at 21:33.
Reply With Quote
  #6   ^
Old Tue, Jul-03-18, 22:20
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 9,086
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/183/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 54%
Location: Texas
Default

I noticed that spicy foods like Chili sauce, wasabi, horseradish, jalapeno, soy sauce and pineapple effect me.
Reply With Quote
  #7   ^
Old Wed, Jul-04-18, 04:51
Mayflowers's Avatar
Mayflowers Mayflowers is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 538
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 205/165/150 Female 5'6"
BF:35
Progress: 73%
Location: Jersey Girl
Default

Wow this is great! Thank you for all the info and tips. I really appreciate the help. I wanted to stay low carb because my BP is back to normal and I have less aches and pains, sleep better. Funny you should mention nuts, I hadn't been eating them but I read how healthy they are and I just started eating a handful of walnuts every day. But last week, I had a stomach virus which caused D and then 2 days of constipation, and this week I came down with a flare up. The most painful one yet . I also have been eating a lot of Dairy and I think all the cheese, slowed down my digestion and helped to start a flare. I also cut way down on my vegetables this past week because I was sick with the virus..My doctor said he felt that the virus, compromised my gut flora and made it easier for the bad bacteria to take over. He gave me Flagyl. I'm also wondering if this is age related or genetic because my grand mother suffered with it too, but she lived to 95

Have any of you had a colonoscopy ? I still haven't yet as I don't like invasive procedures. So then all of you stayed low carb? I was going to give up dairy or just eat yogurt (for the flora) I just read a study that said increasing fiber and probiotics were the best way to avoid a flare up. So glad I'm not alone here. I had flare ups 3 times so far. The first time, I was eating raw oysters at a Japanese restaurant, so I thought I got an infection from the raw oysters. The 2nd time it was about 3 years later, I ate at a restaurant, was cheating and ate a cheeseburger and I got a flare. I thought I picked up a bacteria there. Now, this is a year later and another, the worst flare since I've been low carb. I'm very upset I may have to go off low carb...(to increase fiber)

So from what I'm understanding, from you is that everyone is different on how they prevent flare ups? We all at to kind of do an elimination diet?

Last edited by Mayflowers : Wed, Jul-04-18 at 05:03.
Reply With Quote
  #8   ^
Old Wed, Jul-04-18, 10:29
DelaneyLC's Avatar
DelaneyLC DelaneyLC is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,404
 
Plan: Aí72
Stats: 188/143/144 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 102%
Location: NV
Default

I canít go off LC or I will feel terrible and gain a lot of weight. All my carb eating caused the Diverticulitis in the first place. When I had my colostomy my doctor said I had the pouches and my mom always had trouble with it, also two of my brothers.

I think too much cheese causes constipation and could cause a flare up. Some people stay away from fiber, I am in the middle with some vegetable fiber, but donít overdo it. I think overeating and getting constipated causes me a flare up, if I catch it early then I fast until the pain goes away. Thatís what Iíve been doing for mine. As long as itís not severe pain I can handle it by fasting.

Like you say weíre all different. Once you have it though itís a lifelong issue. I donít think carb eating helps, so I would not go back to carbs myself.
Reply With Quote
  #9   ^
Old Wed, Jul-04-18, 10:52
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 9,086
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/183/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 54%
Location: Texas
Default

Here is a thread started by Arielle
Diverticular disease: Epidemiology and management
http://forum.lowcarber.org/showthread.php?t=479342
Reply With Quote
  #10   ^
Old Wed, Jul-04-18, 11:58
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 9,086
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/183/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 54%
Location: Texas
Default

The Best Detox Diet



Introduction

There are many conditions in Western industrialised societies today that were unheard of, or at least very rare, just a century ago. The same conditions are still unheard of in primitive peoples who do not have the 'benefits' of our knowledge. There is a very good reason for this: They eat what Nature intended; we don't. The diseases caused by our incorrect and unnatural diets are those featured on these pages.


Introduction

The digestive systems of carnivorous and herbivorous animals operate in quite different ways: the former is specifically designed to digest animal proteins and fats, while the latter is constructed to process plant materials.

Whereas the bacterial fermentation of plant starches and fibre, with the production and absorption of short-chain fatty acids, contributes between 60% and 90% of all the energy requirements in plant-eating animals, the colonic fermentation in humans is of minor importance for nutrition, with less than 10% of the energy requirements available from colonic digestion of starch, fibre and protein not absorbed in the small bowel, if the intestine has a normal length and function.

When plant materials enter our digestive system, the cellulose of which plant cell walls are made, which constitute a large proportion of the plant and which we cannot digest, passes through the stomach and small intestine to end up in the colon (large intestine) in an undigested state. Other carbohydrates, even though they have been processed to some extent, will also end up in the colon.

What happens to them is of considerable importance.

Together with the food we eat, the saliva we swallow, the mucus from our noses that we swallow when we sniff, are myriads of bacteria. The vast majority of these will be killed by the strong hydrochloric acid in the stomach and the juices of the small intestine. But a few will inevitably escape and end up in the colon. If the climate there is to their taste, they will take up residence and start families. If it isn't, they pass out in our excreta.

The bacterial flora living in the intestines of herbivores and carnivores are quite different from each other.[1] The digestive process of a herbivore is continued in the colon by a process of bacterial fermentation. It is a vital part of a herbivore's digestive system, designed to get the most out of what is a pretty poor source of nutrition. But no useful digestion takes place in a our colon. All our digestion has taken place in the small intestine and our digestion is close to 100% efficient when we eat foods of animal origin. So what is left is only a small amount of pure (if that is the right word) waste. Within our colons are quite different species of bacteria compared to a herbivore's. Ours are ó or should be ó proteolytic (meaning they break down protein) bacteria that live on proteins and fatty acids, breaking them down in a similar way to the proteolytic enzymes that digest proteins in the small intestine. In the colon, these bacteria attack any protein and fat that has escaped digestion and convert these substances into amino acids, glycerine and conglomerates of amino acids called proteoses and peptides ó exactly the same process as happens further up the gut. But these bacteria are also capable of operating on carbohydrates. And when this happens, acid and gas are produced.

A pure carnivore should eat no plant material, so there should not be any carbohydrate in its colon to support fermentative bacteria. With no fermentative bacteria to produce acids, the proteolytic bacteria thrive there in a healthy alkaline environment.

Civilised Man does not restrict his diet to just meat and fat. He also eats carbohydrates ó and influenced by theories such as Burkitt's fibre hypothesis, and exhortations to eat 'at least five portions of fruit and vegetables a day' ó this ensures that a lot of indigestible carbohydrate in the form of vegetable, fruit and cereal fibre as well as a proportion of other carbohydrates reaches his colon. This changes the gut flora considerably.

Unfortunately, medical science is still not very knowledgeable about such details in human beings, although it is certain that changes are produced when sugar replaces starch; much greater changes occur when carbohydrates replace proteins and fats in the diet.

Even a small amount of carbohydrate in the colon will support a colony of fermentative bacteria; if there is a large amount of the more indigestible carbohydrates such as bran and raw vegetation from salads, the fermentative bacteria will thrive until they can be overwhelming. As the production of acid in the colon soars, the resultant environment becomes hospitable to yeasts, moulds and other fungi. These too are avid fermenters and, as their numbers also increase, the colonic environment becomes more and more acid. But this environment does not suit the beneficial proteolytic bacteria which should be there, so they die off leaving the harmful fermenting bacteria unopposed. This leaves the colon both irritated and irritable. We start to see diarrhoea and other signs of digestive distress. The patient knows nothing of the bacterial change that has taken place. All he is concerned with is that his stools are getting smellier, sloppier and more acid, and his rectum is itching and burning.

At the same time, the irritable colon disturbs the rest of the digestive tract. The stomach becomes gassy and the small intestine speeds up the transport of the food within it. The various vegetable fibres, which are difficult to digest at best are speeded through to the colon with even less digestion than before. And as absorption of nutrients into the body takes time ó and that time is now reduced ó even more reach the colon. This provides an even better environment for the fermenting bacteria, which proliferate, and things go from bad to worse.

Prehistoric Man undoubtedly consumed some plant foods. But it was only in Neolithic times, after they had been made edible by boiling or other forms of cooking with fire that they were used in any real quantity.[2] Right up to Roman times, vegetables, even salad vegetables, were invariably served cooked. While poorer Plebeians were described as eating raw plant foods such as chicory, lettuce, endive and garlic, aristocratic Romans certainly didn't ó unless they needed a laxative.

The eating of raw vegetables died out throughout the Middle Ages, being only used as a purgative. Renaissance Italy seems to have reintroduced the salad trend, but even then salads were cooked, then cooled, vegetables and fish.

The use of raw plant foods other than as a laxative or purgative, is a very modern fad. And it may not be a very healthy one.

What really is a 'detox' diet?

One of the concepts that alternative health professionals believe in is 'cleansing' or 'detoxifying'. It can happen when you add a super-supplement to your diet, or when you eliminate bad stuff you used to eat or drink. We are familiar with the concept for drugs and alcohol, but not so much for foods and other lifestyle habits.

It is dietary carbohydrates alone that cause intestinal distress of varying degrees in carnivores and Man. What we should eat is a non-irritant type of diet: one in which carbohydrates can be eaten, but in such a way that they don't play havoc with the intestinal flora. We need some form of diet that detoxifies the gut.

Because of incorrect or insufficient knowledge, 'detox' diets all seem to be based on raw vegetation or juicing of vegetables and fruit. Quite what the rationale for this is I have no idea because, as I have shown, such a diet is actually quite toxic to the large intestine. And science has shown that a drink of ordinary tap water is far more effective than the various expensive products sold for detoxing.

As far as the intestine is concerned, the diet should be one that does not irritate it. This means, first of all, excluding laxatives such as prunes, figs and rhubarb; it means avoiding sharp, scratchy wastes such as bran; and it also means not juicing raw plant material and fruit, as this, perversely, is one of the best ways to cause all this agony.

To absorb the most carbohydrate in the small intestine and, thus, prevent it from getting to the colon in large quantities, it is necessary to break down the cell walls so that the digestive enzymes can get at and digest the nutrients inside. Juicing does not do this. Looked at through a microscope, even after juicing, plant cells are seen quite plainly to be intact, merely floating about in the fluid portion of the plant. In this form they are just as indigestible as they were in their original whole raw form.

By drinking a glass of orange juice or carrot juice, it is easy to imbibe five or six fruits and, in this way, to greatly increase the amount of carbohydrate in the diet ó which is the very last thing one should do.

Tinned fruit juices are in a different category, as the heat used during the canning process does tend to disintegrate the plant cell walls. But as these juices are generally drunk first thing in the morning, they enter the digestive system quickly, pass through it just as quickly and end up in the colon virtually unchanged ó a perfect medium for the fermentative bacteria and their friends. Canned juices are also frequently sweetened, which is not a good idea.

There is only one way to set the balance right again and that is to eat little that will allow undigested carbohydrate material to reach the colon. This is possible. Synthetic diets composed of pure amino acids, fatty acids and glucose, which need no digestion and leave no residue, will halt the production of acid in the colon and restore the correct balance.[3] But trials on volunteers showed that it takes about three months of very strict dieting to achieve this result, and it had to be conducted in a hospital background.

A more realistic way is to reduce the amount of carbohydrate in your diet to a minimum. And avoid at all costs such material as bran or other vegetable and fruit fibre which cannot be digested, as this will certainly end up feeding the very bacteria you are trying to get rid of.

If you really want to detox, the part that needs detoxifying is your brain: cleanse it of prejudices, inhibitions and inherited appetites. Purge it of unsubstantiated dogma and fill it with science and common sense.

To phew or not to phew

Most of us don't go around smelling the droppings of animals or even our own. But those who live in the country and walk the fields will probably have noticed that where animals such as cows are kept out to grass, their droppings either don't smell or have a not-unpleasant smell. The same is true of sheep, rabbits, and all other animals that eat their natural diet, including carnivorous animals. Compare this with the noisome smell you are likely to carry into the house if you walk in some dog dirt in a city street. This is because domestic pet dogs don't eat a natural diet.

The same is true of humans. Do you pass wind? When you do, does it tend to clear the room? When you go to the lavatory, do you have to open the window and suggest that the next person might be wise to wait a few minutes before 'going'?

My family and I don't. When we go to the lavatory, we use one piece of toilet paper to discover that we didn't need it ó our stools leave us cleanly. And we don't leave a smell behind ó except the day after we have been out to dine with friends.

Last but not least

But getting back to what most people want from a detox diet ó the best by far, and a lot cheaper than all the books and medications, all you need is to drink water.

References

[1]. Dukes HH. The Physiology of Domestic Animals. Comstock Publishing Company, Ithaca, New York, 1955.
[2]. Voegtlin WL. The Stone Age Diet. Vantage Press Inc, New York, NY 1975.
[3]. JAMA 9 May 1966 and Medical World News 20 May 1966. Quoted in Voegtlin WL. Op cit.
http://www.second-opinions.co.uk/de...ml#.Wz0KHeS0Vjp
Reply With Quote
  #11   ^
Old Thu, Jul-05-18, 11:02
Mayflowers's Avatar
Mayflowers Mayflowers is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 538
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 205/165/150 Female 5'6"
BF:35
Progress: 73%
Location: Jersey Girl
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DelaneyLC
I canít go off LC or I will feel terrible and gain a lot of weight. All my carb eating caused the Diverticulitis in the first place. When I had my colostomy my doctor said I had the pouches and my mom always had trouble with it, also two of my brothers.

I think too much cheese causes constipation and could cause a flare up. Some people stay away from fiber, I am in the middle with some vegetable fiber, but donít overdo it. I think overeating and getting constipated causes me a flare up, if I catch it early then I fast until the pain goes away. Thatís what Iíve been doing for mine. As long as itís not severe pain I can handle it by fasting.
.

Thanks for your input I believe diverticulitis is genetic, as you have it in your family. In my family, my grandmother suffered with it. I think it came down to me so you and I are very susceptible to flora imbalances. Do you take probiotics? I take them but I need to increase them to 50 billion now. I never had an issue with diverticulitis until I ate meat. When I was younger and ate meat, I had IBS. All of that stopped when I went vegetarian. No IBS and no Diverticulitis. When I went low carb again, my IBS flared up then it stopped then now a month later the worst Diverticulitis flare so far happened. I think its a combination of meat and cheese. I've always had a dairy intolerance and I was going crazy on cheese before this flare. I made an appt to see the GI next month. I guess I'll cave and get a colonoscopy to see what's going on.
Reply With Quote
  #12   ^
Old Thu, Jul-05-18, 11:03
Mayflowers's Avatar
Mayflowers Mayflowers is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 538
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 205/165/150 Female 5'6"
BF:35
Progress: 73%
Location: Jersey Girl
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Meme#1
Here is a thread started by Arielle
Diverticular disease: Epidemiology and management
http://forum.lowcarber.org/showthread.php?t=479342

Thanks for the link. I swear, I searched all the forums and nothing came up!
Oh, I know why because she posted "Diverticular" not Diverticulitis.
Reply With Quote
  #13   ^
Old Thu, Jul-05-18, 15:48
DelaneyLC's Avatar
DelaneyLC DelaneyLC is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,404
 
Plan: Aí72
Stats: 188/143/144 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 102%
Location: NV
Default

Diverticulosis is common in older people. Itís called diverticulosis when the pouches are formed. There are no symptoms.

When an infection & inflammation happens itís called diverticulitis.

People can go years with the pouches and have no symptoms and not know they have it. Itís not until a flare-up happens that it becomes an issue. I was diagnosed With the pouches about 5 years before I had a flare-up. Since my mother had infections and I had the pouches I knew right away what it was. It is thought to be a genetic predisposition for the disease. I was a huge carb eater before I discovered low carb and I believe the sugar & grains had something to do with my getting diverticulosis. Though they arenít sure, a history of constipation may have something to do with it too.


I eat mostly chicken, fish & vegetables now. Not as much red meat, but I do eat some on a limited basis. I take magnesium & fish oil daily.
Reply With Quote
  #14   ^
Old Fri, Jul-06-18, 09:51
Mayflowers's Avatar
Mayflowers Mayflowers is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 538
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 205/165/150 Female 5'6"
BF:35
Progress: 73%
Location: Jersey Girl
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DelaneyLC
. I was diagnosed With the pouches about 5 years before I had a flare-up.


Yes thanks I already knew about that info. I'm pretty sure the condition is genetic as well. But, how long has it been since you've had a flare up? What is your age if you don't mind my asking? I'm 62.

Chicken is a known intestinal irritant so I was eating a lot of chicken at this time and tons of dairy, cheese. The only time I had a flare was when I was eating meat.
Reply With Quote
  #15   ^
Old Fri, Jul-06-18, 10:08
PilotGal PilotGal is offline
Look up to the sky
Posts: 43,215
 
Plan: Maintenance since 2007.
Stats: 206.6/178/178 Female 5'7
BF:awesome
Progress: 100%
Location: USA
Default

hope you're feeling better.
the times when I have had attacks were when I upped my roughage - namely salads.. each time, i landed in the ER.
i'm the only one in my family that has this problem..
other than that, this diet is perfect for me..
i only get attacks when i'm feeling thrifty and decide to eat "cheap" raw salads for awhile. fiber hurts me.
.
.
.
***** edited to add: i keep peppermint oil in my cupboard.. it relaxes the inflamed intestines.. i put drops in water and drink the water and it calms the intestines.

Last edited by PilotGal : Fri, Jul-06-18 at 14:31.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:16.


Copyright © 2000-2018 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.