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  #1   ^
Old Fri, Jun-29-18, 07:04
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Plan: mostly milkfat
Stats: 190/152.4/154 Male 67inches
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Location: Ontario
Default Crummy adult guidelines for type II even worse for kids

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...80626113322.htm

Quote:
Youth need different approach to type 2 diabetes treatment
Two medications helpful for adults don't slow the progression of the disease in kids and teens

A major study has found that medicines used to treat diabetes in adults are not effective on youth. The researchers say the finding is disturbing because type 2 diabetes among youth is a growing problem.

In youth with impaired glucose tolerance or recent-onset type 2 diabetes, neither initial treatment with long-acting insulin followed by the drug metformin, nor metformin alone, preserved the body's ability to make insulin, according to results published online June 25 in Diabetes Care. The publication is concurrent to a presentation of the results at the American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions in Orlando, Florida.

"These findings tell us that the treatments that work on adults and that we currently use for type 2 diabetes in youth are not as effective as we would like and therefore we need to develop new approaches to treat adolescents with the disease," said Dr. Steven Kahn, professor of medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine and an endocrinologist at Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care. Kahn leads the site in Seattle and chairs the national study.

The results were published concurrently in Diabetes Care with two other manuscripts that compared participants of the pediatric trial with their adult counterparts participating in two other RISE, or Restoring Insulin Secretion, trials.

The results come from a study of 91 youth ages 10 to 19, part of the larger RISE study. Trials in the RISE Consortium are among the first to directly compare youth with type 2 diabetes to their adult counterparts.

To determine if early, aggressive treatment would improve outcomes, participants at four study sites were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups. The first received three months of glargine, a long-acting insulin, followed by nine months of metformin, an oral medication which is commonly prescribed to help control high blood sugar levels. The second received only metformin for 12 months. Participants were then monitored for three more months after treatment ended.

The RISE Pediatric Medication Study found that beta cell function, which is key to the body's ability to make and release insulin, declined in both groups during treatment and worsened after treatment ended.

"These studies provide critical new information that helps us better understand why type 2 diabetes seems to progress more rapidly in young people. This is important news given the growing epidemic of this disease in youth, who were previously spared of type 2 diabetes and its complications," Kahn said.

RISE was funded primarily by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) of the National Institutes of Health and was conducted at eight study sites, including the University of Washington School of Medicine and the VA Puget Sound Health Care System.

"Only two drugs are currently approved for youth with type 2 diabetes, and we were disheartened to find that neither effectively slows disease progression," said Dr. Ellen Leschek, project scientist for the RISE Consortium and program director in NIDDK's Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases. "Type 2 diabetes in youth has grown with the obesity epidemic, and we need treatments that work for kids. It's clear from this study and others that type 2 diabetes in youth is more aggressive than in adults."

The longer a person has type 2 diabetes, the greater the likelihood of developing complications including heart, kidney, eye, and nerve diseases, making it critical for young people with type 2 diabetes to quickly achieve and sustain control of their blood glucose. However, because type 2 diabetes has historically been an adult condition, information about how to effectively treat youth is limited, and pediatric diabetes experts have had to rely on best practices for adult treatment, an imperfect translation given the differences in physiology between the groups.
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  #2   ^
Old Fri, Jun-29-18, 07:16
khrussva's Avatar
khrussva khrussva is offline
Posts: 6,806
 
Plan: My own - < 30 net carbs
Stats: 440/205/210 Male 5' 11"
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Progress: 102%
Location: Central Virginia - USA
Default

Why is the obvious so invisible to these people. If glucose tolerance is the problem, it seems like a no brainer to me that less glucose in the diet might be the place to start. But when the primary focus is to find a drug to 'cure' glucose intolerance then a nutritional solution isn't even a consideration. They are blind to the obvious.
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  #3   ^
Old Fri, Jun-29-18, 07:19
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cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Posts: 4,103
 
Plan: very low carb real food
Stats: 245/128/135 Female 62
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Progress: 106%
Location: Vermont
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Quote:
Originally Posted by khrussva
Why is the obvious so invisible to these people. If glucose tolerance is the problem, it seems like a no brainer to me that less glucose in the diet might be the place to start. But when the primary focus is to find a drug to 'cure' glucose intolerance then a nutritional solution isn't even a consideration. They are blind to the obvious.


Exactly! I agree, blind to the obvious.
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  #4   ^
Old Fri, Jun-29-18, 08:11
bevangel's Avatar
bevangel bevangel is online now
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Plan: modified adkins (sort of)
Stats: 265/176/167 Female 68.5 inches
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Progress: 91%
Location: Austin, TX
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sigh... and even if some doctors somewhere were to suggest that their pediatric T2 patients TRY a low-carb/ketogenic diet and were to find that it works, there would probably be an outcry that we simply CANNOT ask teenagers to stop eating pizzas, french fries, hamburgers with buns, macaroni and cheese, candy, etc when that's what all of their friends eat.
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  #5   ^
Old Fri, Jun-29-18, 08:41
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Ambulo Ambulo is online now
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Posts: 1,133
 
Plan: No GPS/OMAD (23:1)
Stats: 150/125/120 Female 64 inches
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Progress: 83%
Location: the North, England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bevangel
sigh... and even if some doctors somewhere were to suggest that their pediatric T2 patients TRY a low-carb/ketogenic diet and were to find that it works, there would probably be an outcry that we simply CANNOT ask teenagers to stop eating pizzas, french fries, hamburgers with buns, macaroni and cheese, candy, etc when that's what all of their friends eat.


I often hear this attitude from parents who don't want their child to feel different by eating differently from their friends, e.g. the ketogenic diet for epilepsy. These parents want doctors to prescribe pills, and for there to be better pills. I wonder what they would do if their child had peanut allergy.
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  #6   ^
Old Fri, Jun-29-18, 09:45
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 10,320
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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But they did hear about low carb this year. Two crummy papers out of the whole week...but it got press.

http://forum.lowcarber.org/showthread.php?t=480607
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  #7   ^
Old Sat, Jun-30-18, 10:54
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is online now
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Plan: Dr. Bernstein
Stats: 188/160/135 Female 5 ft 4 inches
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Location: NE WA
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I read about this in our local paper & it got me to wondering: If meds & insulin don't help t2 kids, do they really help t2 adults?

Artificially lowering cholesterol with medication doesn't prevent heart attacks, so does artificially lowering blood glucose prevent side affects of diabetes or just lower the numbers?
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  #8   ^
Old Sat, Jun-30-18, 13:20
Zei Zei is offline
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Posts: 1,326
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
BF:
Progress: 34%
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie OFS
I read about this in our local paper & it got me to wondering: If meds & insulin don't help t2 kids, do they really help t2 adults?

Artificially lowering cholesterol with medication doesn't prevent heart attacks, so does artificially lowering blood glucose prevent side affects of diabetes or just lower the numbers?

I think Dr. Jason Fung would say it does not help, that you must get the excess glucose out of the body, not just shift its location out of the blood and around like sweeping dirt under a rug. Because it is still in you causing harm someplace even though numbers look good.
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  #9   ^
Old Sat, Jun-30-18, 15:42
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 8,228
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
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Progress: 31%
Location: Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bevangel
sigh... and even if some doctors somewhere were to suggest that their pediatric T2 patients TRY a low-carb/ketogenic diet and were to find that it works, there would probably be an outcry that we simply CANNOT ask teenagers to stop eating pizzas, french fries, hamburgers with buns, macaroni and cheese, candy, etc when that's what all of their friends eat.


Our grammer schools allowed any parent to bring in 30 cupcakes for the class when their child had thier birthday!!!! WTH???? My kid did not need 30 cupcakeI s !!! Finally a committee put an end to this based on the sanitation of the product---NOT the content. The plan was to eliminate ALL food--then superintndent "suggested" a list of alternatives. Everyone caved and any junk food in original individual serving size is now allowed. I quit the committee.

My kids eat a great lunch FROM HOME, having better food choices than school lunch has helped PREVENT diabetes for my kids. So far. .....
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