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  #61   ^
Old Sun, Jul-22-18, 09:52
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
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THank you Janet--
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  #62   ^
Old Sun, Jul-22-18, 10:05
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
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Location: Massachusetts
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from the above source
Quote:
What is a Well Formulated Ketogenic Diet for Kids?
So what does a ketogenic diet for kids look like? There are a couple recommendations that a different when it comes to kids and keto. First, kids need more protein (per pound of lean mass) than adults. While adults have a protein goal of about 0.8 times your lean mass (in pounds) for grams of protein per day, kids need much more to help fuel their growth. Healthy growth needs lots of complete amino acids to build new muscles and help kids grow. For young kids around 5-8 years old or so, they need about 3.0 times their lean mass for their protein goal each day. Pre-teens and teens need about 2.0 times their lean mass.

So what does that look like? Letís say you have a 8-9 year old (like our son Micah) who is about 60 pounds. He is pretty lean so his lean mass is maybe 50-55 pounds of lean mass. So his protein goal is about 3 times that or 150 grams of protein a day. He is on the upper edge of the 3.0 range so he generally could get between 2.0 and 3.0 times his lean mass so a goal of 100-150 grams of protein a day is a good place to start. But generally speaking, just donít limit the protein. Let them eat as much as they need along with all the healthy fats that come with it.

The other change we do for growing kids is we donít do any form of fasting (intermittent or otherwise). Kids growth demands require a lot of fuel and their stomachs arenít big enough so they need 3 meals a day and sometimes a bedtime snack. But they donít need to be snacking all day long. If they eat until full with three meals they donít generally require any snacks except sometimes in the evening.


Quote:
Our recommendation for adults is 0.8 times your lean mass (in pounds) for your protein grams a day. Kids need much more to fuel growth. Young kids like toddlers need 3.0 times their lean mass. Early teens maybe 2.0 times their lean mass.


Quote:
And if you want to talk about what is the real SUPERFOOD, organ meats like beef liver top anything out there. Beef liver is one of the most nutrient dense foods out there. So we suggest adding a serving or two a week to kick up your nutrient density. Donít like beef liver? We like to hide it so our boys donít even know it is in there. We make a recipe that has a spicy flavor profile like our Breakfast Chili and sub some of the ground beef for ground beef liver. Mix it together and with the spice of the chili you donít even know it is in there!



There are MANY micronutrients specific to vegetables, two that come to mind are in apples and kale.

The comparison chart uses beef. Is this convensional beef or grassfed beef? ANd what percent of the diet is beef versus chicken, pork and fish. My understanding is that poultry is by far the protein of choice in the american diet.

Did not see specifics. Looking.

Last edited by Ms Arielle : Sun, Jul-22-18 at 10:18.
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  #63   ^
Old Sun, Jul-22-18, 11:10
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 8,522
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 31%
Location: Massachusetts
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I watched a video of a biscuit---kerrygold cheese and butter, think that one is organic, not sure it is grassfed.

I have concerns about eating a lot of nuts.......

Perhaps serving the meat with pan gravy and sauted vegies is enough.
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  #64   ^
Old Sun, Jul-22-18, 11:46
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 8,522
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 31%
Location: Massachusetts
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A convoluted trail led me back to ADHD and the treatment drugs that raise the dopamine levels by blocking the receptors. Like Ritlin and a dozen others.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dopamine_agonist

Which was a link at this site when investigating thyroid function, or rather possible disfunction.

https://www.restartmed.com/medicati...yroid-problems/

These medications can complicate your clinical picture and make determining how to proceed with thyroid dosing difficult.

Medications which are known to lower your TSH include:

Glucocorticoids (5) (which includes steroids such as prednisone) - Frequently used to treat inflammatory conditions and autoimmune diseases.
Dopamine agonists - Often used to treat Parkinson's disease.
Somatostatin analogs (6)- Used in rare forms of cancer to block hormone production.
Metformin (7)- Used to treat insulin resistance and type II diabetes mellitus.


This is a distressing list of side effects-- it includes all the 4 types above, and not separated out by drug. I recognize some of these problems as connected to the ADD drugs.


Side effects
Some of the common side effects of dopamine agonists include:[8][9]

Euphoria
Pericardial effusion
Fibrous thickening of lining that covers some of the internal organs including the heart or the lungs (fibrotic reaction)
Hallucinations
Causing or worsening psychosis
Orthostatic hypotension
Increased orgasmic intensity
Weight loss
Anorexia (symptom)
Nausea and possible vomiting
Insomnia
Unusual tiredness or weakness
Dizziness
Drowsiness
Possible Narcolepsy manifestations (Sleep attacks)[10]
Lightheadedness
Raynaud's phenomenon (common side effect of ergot derivatives)
Syncope
Twitching, twisting, or other unusual body movements
Pathological addiction (gambling, shopping, internet pornography, hyper-sexuality) Ė specifically D3-preferring agonists
After long-term use of dopamine agonists, a withdrawal syndrome may occur, during dose reduction or discontinuation, with the following possible side effects: anxiety, panic attacks, dysphoria, depression, agitation, irritability, suicidal ideation, fatigue, orthostatic hypotension, nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis, generalized pain, and drug cravings. For some individuals, these withdrawal symptoms are short-lived and make a full recovery, for others a protracted withdrawal syndrome may occur with withdrawal symptoms persisting for months or years.[11]



Some medical drugs act as dopamine agonists and can treat hypodopaminergic (low dopamine) conditions; they are typically used for treating Parkinson's disease (PD), Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (in the form of stimulants) and certain pituitary tumors (prolactinoma), and may be useful for restless legs syndrome (RLS). Both ropinirole and pramipexole are FDA-approved for the treatment of RLS. There is also an ongoing clinical trial to test the effectiveness of the dopamine agonist ropinirole in reversing the symptoms of SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction.[6]

Last edited by Ms Arielle : Sun, Jul-22-18 at 11:52.
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  #65   ^
Old Sat, Aug-11-18, 05:50
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JEY100 JEY100 is online now
To Good Health!
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Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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Arielle,
My friend Jess is doing an interview later this morning, about an hour from when posting this, with a young man on the Autism Spectrum, who has lost 92 pounds doing Keto. It's a public FB group so you should be able to see it? The interview remains after this FB Live is over so posting it on this thread. https://www.facebook.com/groups/311...98932467214996/


ps: Tried to send a PM, storage space is full.
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  #66   ^
Old Wed, Aug-22-18, 20:45
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 8,522
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 31%
Location: Massachusetts
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THanks Janet,still trying to access the talk. Im not a facebook user, so will ask a friend to help me find the actual talk. Im dying to know what aspects were helped by changing the diet.

Ya I keep PM full .
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  #67   ^
Old Thu, Aug-23-18, 02:42
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
To Good Health!
Posts: 10,375
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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The link above was to Jess's announcement. This is the link to the Video itself, still on FB. https://www.facebook.com/jessica.du...?type=2&theater

John is in college now, he wants to teach special needs kids. He talked about improved focus, skills he needed to get through HS and continue education.
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  #68   ^
Old Thu, Aug-23-18, 05:04
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 8,522
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
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Progress: 31%
Location: Massachusetts
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Thanks , Janet. Watching it now.
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  #69   ^
Old Fri, Sep-28-18, 12:26
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
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wow, here is a few details on understanding norepinephrine. Dr Wood's testimony gave me this direction to search. I have repeated over and over how son has a problem with memory: Doc pooo-poo it as oh, its the ADD, but give no further help. Well, he is ON ADD meds but that memory still needs a boost.

https://www.selfhacked.com/blog/nor...hrine_Help_ADHD
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  #70   ^
Old Fri, Sep-28-18, 13:12
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
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Progress: 31%
Location: Massachusetts
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The list below from site above, has links imbedded at the website.



Increasing Norepinephrine

Exercise (R)-----doable
Cold Exposure (R)
Phenylalanine (precursor)--how? sadas? aspartame?
Tyrosine (precursor)--easy to buy

Mucuna (contains L-Dopa)
Acetyl L-Carnitine (R)
Nicotine (R, R, R)
Bitter orange (with Rhodiola) (R)
Rhodiola (with bitter orange) (R) (inhibits MAOA and COMT)
Sodium reduction (R)
BH4
Tianeptine (R)
EGCG (MAO and COMT inhibitor)--dr Amen has info
Quercetin (inhibits MAOA and COMT)--saw combioned with bromainds--where??
Fisetin (inhibits MAOA and COMT)
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  #71   ^
Old Fri, Sep-28-18, 13:21
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
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https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-...ne/faq-20058361

Quote:
Mayo Clinic Diet



My favorite diet soda has a warning about phenylalanine. Is phenylalanine bad for your health?

Answer From Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D.

Phenylalanine isn't a health concern for most people. However, for people who have the genetic disorder phenylketonuria (PKU) or certain other health conditions, phenylalanine can be a serious health concern.

Phenylalanine can cause intellectual disabilities, brain damage, seizures and other problems in people with PKU. Phenylalanine occurs naturally in many protein-rich foods, such as milk, eggs and meat. Phenylalanine also is sold as a dietary supplement.

The artificial sweetener aspartame (Equal, NutraSweet), which is added to many medications, diet foods and diet sodas, contains phenylalanine.

Federal regulations require that any food that contains aspartame bear this warning: "Phenylketonurics: Contains phenylalanine." This warning helps people with PKU avoid products that are a source of phenylalanine.

If you don't have PKU, you probably don't need to worry about harmful health effects of phenylalanine ó with certain important exceptions. Aspartame in large doses can cause a rapid increase in the brain levels of phenylalanine. Because of this, use products with aspartame cautiously if you:

Take certain medications, such as monoamine oxidase inhibitors, neuroleptics or medications that contain levodopa
Have tardive dyskinesia (a muscle movement disorder)
Have a sleep disorder, anxiety disorder or other mental health condition; phenylalanine may worsen feelings of anxiety and jitteriness

If you aren't sure if phenylalanine or aspartame is a concern for you, talk to your doctor. A blood test to determine if you have PKU is available.



Betting small doses maybe beneficial as a precursor, one of the building blocks. How much is the question. Perhaps use a diet soda.

Maybe that is why I like diet sodas?? Maybe there is a boost in dopamine because of the diet sodas I drink.
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  #72   ^
Old Fri, Sep-28-18, 13:27
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 8,522
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
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Progress: 31%
Location: Massachusetts
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Quote:
Effect of dietary aspartame on plasma concentrations of phenylalanine and tyrosine in normal and homozygous phenylketonuric patients.
Mackey SA1, Berlin CM Jr.
Author information
Abstract
Six normal subjects each ingested a single 12-oz can of a diet cola (Diet Coke) providing 184 mg aspartame (APM), of which 104 mg is phenylalanine (Phe), and, on another occasion, a single 12-oz can of regular cola (Coke Classic). Neither cola significantly affected plasma concentrations of Phe or tyrosine over the three-hour postingestion study period. Each of five homozygous phenylketonuric (PKU) subjects (ages 11, 16, 17, 21, and 23 years) ingested a single 12-oz can of the same diet cola. In these five subjects (three with classic PKU and two with hyperphenylalinemia), the increase in plasma Phe concentrations varied from 0.26 mg/dL to 1.77 mg/dL two or three hours after ingestion (baseline levels, 5.04 to 17.2 mg/dL). Tyrosine concentrations did not differ significantly from baseline levels. The data indicate that ingestion of dietary Phe, as supplied in a single can of diet cola, is readily handled in both normal and PKU subjects. The small increases in plasma Phe concentrations in the homozygous PKU patients are not considered clinically significant.


This infers that the phenylalanine can increase the tyrosine levels.

tyrosine is easily purchased online; it can work well, and it can stop working. Now I am wondering why it seems to stop working.
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  #73   ^
Old Fri, Sep-28-18, 13:28
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
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Is There A Warning On The Add Meds About Diet Sodas Or Phenylalanine ??
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  #74   ^
Old Fri, Sep-28-18, 13:36
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 8,522
 
Plan: atkins
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another source, easier to understand than MAYO

Quote:

Fooducate
Mar 16 2011
7 Things to Know about Aspartame, Phenylalanine, and Those Scary Warnings on Soft Drinks

Fooducate community member Skyler asks about a warning she saw on a pack of gum -
"Phenylketonurics - contains phenylalanine"


What is this? And what does it have to do with chewing gum? Or diet soda?

What you need to know:

1. Phenylalanine is an amino acid. Amino acids sounds scary, but they are actually the building blocks of protein.

2. Phenylalanine is actually an essential amino acid. This means the body cannot create any on its own, and thus must receive it as part of a diet, usually when consuming proteins.

3. So where can one find phenylalanine? In breast milk (for babies), and in most animal products (meat, dairy, eggs).

4. Oh, and in aspartame too. Yes, that cursed artificial sweetener breaks down into several components in our body, one of them being phenylalanine.

So what's with the warning?

5. Turns out that one in 15,000 people in the world has a genetic disorder called Phenylketonuria. Their body can't metabolize synthesize phenylalanine. As it builds up in the body, it causes all sorts of bad things to happen, such as mental retardation, seizures, and other brain damage.

6. People suffering from Phenylketonuria (or PKU) are called phenylketonurics. They need to constantly monitor their protein intake. They are also warned about consumption of products containing aspartame - hence the warning on labels - "Phenylketonurics - contains phenylalanine".

7. If you don't have PKU, you probably don't need to worry about harmful health effects of phenylalanine. But that doesn't mean that aspartame is healthy for you, or that diet drinks are a healthy choice.

....
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  #75   ^
Old Fri, Sep-28-18, 13:45
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Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Plan: atkins
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IS THIS TRUE????
Quote:

Especially when these facts exist about diet sodas from various scientific sources:

Findings from a variety of studies show that routine consumption of diet sodas, even one per day, can be connected to higher likelihood of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and high blood pressure, in addition to contributing to weight gain.Ē Susan E. Swithers, a professor of psychological sciences and a behavioural neuroscientist.

Daily consumption of diet soda was associated with a 36% greater relative risk of incident metabolic syndrome and a 67% greater relative risk of incident type 2 diabetes compared with non consumption in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19151203



https://therenegadepharmacist.com/d...ilar-diet-soda/
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