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  #1   ^
Old Mon, Mar-19-18, 09:18
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
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Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
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Location: NC
Default Obesity and Exercise...both up!

Somewhat paradoxically, both measures post all-time high rates

Americans are polarized when it comes to politics, guns, and the New York Yankees. Now, maybe, we can add some basic health metrics to the conversation, as well.

This week, the National Center for Health Statistics released data showing divergent all-time highs: More Americans than ever before, 31.4%, are obese. At the same time, more Americans than ever before met federal physical activity guidelines for aerobic activity, at 54.8%.

The obesity figure continues a well-known trend. The 31.4% reflects just the first 3 months of 2017, but would represent an increase of nearly a full percentage point from 2016. In 1997, for perspective, the rate was under 20%. There were significant differences in obesity rates by race among women. It was most pronounced in African-American women -- within that population, the obesity rate was 48.9%. Among Hispanic women, the rate was 34.2%; white women were at 29.4%. There were no significant differences among males by race.

The growth in people meeting aerobic guidelines, however, has been far less linear. The guidelines call for 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity, 75 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity.

From 1997 to 2006, the rate was stable, hovering at around 40%. Since then, there's been a steady uptick.

Males were more likely than their female counterparts to meet requirements at every age group. As people age, the rate of people meeting the requirements decreased. Whites were far more likely to meet the standards than African Americans or Hispanic people, at nearly 60% last year. African Americans came in at 45.4%; Hispanics, at 45.6%.

It's noteworthy, though, that these data came from the National Health Interview Survey and thus relied on respondents' self-reports. It therefore remains possible that what has changed isn't so much people's exercise habits, but what they tell pollsters about them.

[graph] https://www.medpagetoday.com/public...e-numbers/71802


Would love to repeat that "You Can't Outrun a Bad Diet" ...and that may indeed be true...but just as likely people lied about how much they exercised.
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  #2   ^
Old Mon, Mar-19-18, 10:22
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is online now
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
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Default

Yes, a survey is not something on which one can hang a hat, particularly one about exercise. Continually increasing obesity rates, however, are troubling and not surprising given the current state of the DGAs.
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  #3   ^
Old Mon, Mar-19-18, 12:06
Zei Zei is offline
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Plan: Carb reduction in general
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Quote:
Americans are polarized when it comes to politics, guns, and the New York Yankees. Now, maybe, we can add some basic health metrics to the conversation, as well.

This week, the National Center for Health Statistics released data showing divergent all-time highs: More Americans than ever before, 31.4%, are obese. At the same time, more Americans than ever before met federal physical activity guidelines for aerobic activity, at 54.8%.
If by polarized they mean to suggest some people like to exercise while others are fat, I'm willing to believe on the other hand that many of the fat people are the same people who are exercising hoping it will make them lose weight (as part of the rarely successful eat-less-move-more thing). I've exercised when fat, when I was thinner, while obese, and I've found Gary Taubes and others are right when they say exercise isn't a weight loss solution because your body adjusts for it to maintain weight homeostasis just as it does downregulating metabolic energy output if you cut calories. Some people will start an exercise program expecting to lose weight and then quit when that doesn't happen. Instead they should exercise for all the other healthy things it does for them instead and find another way like low-carb/keto etc. to lose weight.
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  #4   ^
Old Mon, Mar-19-18, 12:47
khrussva's Avatar
khrussva khrussva is online now
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Plan: My own - < 30 net carbs
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Frankly, I'd have a much easier time estimating my exercise regimen on a survey than I would recalling my eating patterns. I wouldn't be surprised if this trend is real. Obesity is an problem on the rise and I don't doubt that some people are in panic mode about it. "They" tell us to eat less and exercise more. If you are eating bad food it is really hard to eat less when you are exercising more.

I recently joined my nearby YMCA. I was surprised how big it was -- pool, indoor walking track, and at least 200 stations in the gym for lifting weights, treadmill, step machines, stationary bikes, elliptical, etc. I was also surprised how busy it is. I've been going there after work and I'd say that 80% of the equipment is in use at those peak hours. While there are plenty of normal BMI gym rats working out, a high percentage of the regulars are overweight, obese, or morbidly obese. There are lots of folks over 50, too. I do think that people are trying. They just don't get the right message. As long as your joints can take it, exercise is good. But eating right has to come first.
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  #5   ^
Old Mon, Mar-19-18, 13:25
Gypsybyrd's Avatar
Gypsybyrd Gypsybyrd is offline
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I can buy into this. For me, exercise does not trigger weight loss but weight gain. Especially aerobic exercise. Strength training not so much. If I do aerobic exercise and low carb, the weight loss slows.
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  #6   ^
Old Tue, Mar-20-18, 21:08
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Dodger Dodger is offline
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Plan: Paleoish
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I have always been a heavy exerciser. When I ate low-fat, I kept gaining weight while continuing to exercise. Since switching to low-carb over 15 years=ago, I have lost over 50 pounds while still exercising.

My exercise never seemed to affect my weight. My diet certainly did.
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