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  #16   ^
Old Thu, Jul-05-18, 11:14
Mayflowers's Avatar
Mayflowers Mayflowers is offline
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Posts: 538
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 205/165/150 Female 5'6"
BF:35
Progress: 73%
Location: Jersey Girl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PilotGal
i know, when I have an attack, it's always on the left side.



This time my attack was all over my abdomen so bloated. It hurt on the left and the right side! Then when I started Flagyl, the pain was localized on the left lower quadrant. Now its subsiding and getting twinges on the left side after 4 days of medication. Stomach is still bloated.
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  #17   ^
Old Thu, Jul-05-18, 11:20
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Mayflowers Mayflowers is offline
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Posts: 538
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 205/165/150 Female 5'6"
BF:35
Progress: 73%
Location: Jersey Girl
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IMO I think Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis are symptoms of a food intolerance. Be it dairy, wheat, gluten, red meat, whatever. Why can some people eat low carb with no symptoms? Why do some people thrive on a vegetarian diet or vegan diet? Its all individual and what that particular person can or cannot tolerate.
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  #18   ^
Old Thu, Jul-05-18, 11:53
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Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
Posts: 9,092
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/183/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 54%
Location: Texas
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Here is what a doctor told me about the pain moving around. When you have an irritation in the intestines in one place, the entire thing reacts like a snake, since it is a bundle of muscles. I actually get bad stabbing pain on the left side when it flares up.
There is a drug that is not a pain killer or muscle relaxer but somehow it stops the pain and relaxes the gut. It's called Dicyclomine. It can be used as needed.
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  #19   ^
Old Thu, Jul-05-18, 13:19
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 8,242
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 31%
Location: Massachusetts
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Not an expert here but would like to know more---- seems the GI has a very complex job and it woud make sense that our food choices make a huge impact.

Recently I am learning that we could/should eat foods that are p rotective of the GI and even supportive.

Being a lover of food, and cooking and gardening and raising my own meats ( some of it) I am on a journey of realizing how many foods have fallen off our plates and are forgotton.

How many foods were fermented before consuming: pickled vegies, natto, tempeh, etc. How many grains were fermented before consuming like beers and mead ( was that grain based?) . ANd a time when fermented foods are still eaten in the third world countries......

I am becoming certain that what we eat either helps or hurts the GI and sets it up to become ill, or keeps it healthy and functioning correctly.
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  #20   ^
Old Thu, Jul-05-18, 14:42
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
Posts: 9,092
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/183/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 54%
Location: Texas
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There are many things that could contribute; stress, food poisoning, lifelong antibiotic use since childhood for most of us since it was invented for everything, low-fat/high fiber diets pushed on us since the 70s. Could be any or all of the above!
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  #21   ^
Old Thu, Jul-05-18, 17:00
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 8,242
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 31%
Location: Massachusetts
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Im looking thru Dr Granby's works and find it amazing. DOes anyone suggest that ?? The Plant Paradox seems worth the read as just the bits available thru AMazon sneak peak has me convinced that healing the gut must include limiting the lectins and possibly eliminating them for some people.
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  #22   ^
Old Thu, Jul-05-18, 17:22
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
Posts: 9,092
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/183/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 54%
Location: Texas
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lectins are the dark shade veggies?
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  #23   ^
Old Thu, Jul-05-18, 17:31
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 8,242
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 31%
Location: Massachusetts
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no. These are a group of chemicals that plants use to protect themselves....beans, legumes, peanuts, all grains. All night shades: potatoes, tomatoes, goji berries, etc.

The amount can be reduced thru heat treatment, fermentation, soaking, sprouting.

High in the hulls, bran and germ of the seeds, so white rice is better than brown . Just as well more arsnic, is higher in the brown rice than the white rice.

Glutin is ONE kind of lectin.
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  #24   ^
Old Fri, Jul-06-18, 09:58
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Mayflowers Mayflowers is offline
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Posts: 538
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 205/165/150 Female 5'6"
BF:35
Progress: 73%
Location: Jersey Girl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meme#1
There are many things that could contribute; stress, food poisoning, lifelong antibiotic use since childhood for most of us since it was invented for everything, low-fat/high fiber diets pushed on us since the 70s. Could be any or all of the above!

I had a lot of antibiotics as a kid. Tetracycline..others amox. I plan on really increasing my probiotics and prebiotic fiber after this flare. I'm going to take 50 billion and work my way to 90 billion probiotics. I don't think I was taking enough. Odd was right when I got the attack, I was drinking kefir, which I haven't had in a long time. Could diverticulitis be actually caused by a food intolerance like to dairy? (lowers the immune system and irritates the bowl and allows the bad bacteria to grow) All I know is when I was vegetarian I never had any issues.
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  #25   ^
Old Fri, Jul-06-18, 10:19
Mayflowers's Avatar
Mayflowers Mayflowers is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 538
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 205/165/150 Female 5'6"
BF:35
Progress: 73%
Location: Jersey Girl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Im looking thru Dr Granby's works and find it amazing. DOes anyone suggest that ?? The Plant Paradox seems worth the read as just the bits available thru AMazon sneak peak has me convinced that healing the gut must include limiting the lectins and possibly eliminating them for some people.

I'm not sure...could it have been constipation from too much cheese and meat that caused it? or the intolerance to dairy? If the stools are not moving fast through the colon,(which a high fiber diet would cause) then they would stop and the fecal matter has a chance to lodge in the pockets then the bacteria grows.
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  #26   ^
Old Fri, Jul-06-18, 10:33
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 8,242
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 31%
Location: Massachusetts
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Curious that there is NOTHING about the health of the GI. Seems to me the GI should be able to handle all these issues without causing an issue.

Poor gut health seems to be another victim of SADS.
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  #27   ^
Old Sat, Jul-07-18, 05:52
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Mayflowers Mayflowers is offline
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Posts: 538
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 205/165/150 Female 5'6"
BF:35
Progress: 73%
Location: Jersey Girl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Curious that there is NOTHING about the health of the GI. Seems to me the GI should be able to handle all these issues without causing an issue.

Poor gut health seems to be another victim of SADS.

I'll be the first person to admit my diet wasn't good during the first 2 flares. I found out from the doctor, I had flares 6/14, 7/17 and now again 7/18. Why is it always in the summer? Is it because bacteria grows easier in the summer? weird. My diet was not good I was eating sugar, dairy, processed foods. I was so annoyed that with this flare, I was eating very healthy, keto, and no sugar..No sweeteners except a little bit of monk fruit. (but was eating a lot of dairy, cheese, and cream, butter)

Last edited by Mayflowers : Sat, Jul-07-18 at 06:48.
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  #28   ^
Old Sat, Jul-07-18, 07:39
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 8,242
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 31%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Im sorry you have to deal with this-- gut pain is unbearable.

THe summer connection is interesting. Clearly, a clue. Perhaps a build up in the months earlier or perhaps one acute event.

Months ago I started adding more fermented type foods to support the GI microflora, and now given the high change of developing diverticulitis, that is one more reason to help the gut.

Yesterday I learned that Vit C is important to the health of the GI track.

Yesterday I learned that lectins can be irritating to the gut. And how our food prep has changed in a couple generations---thses new methods allows far more lectins to enter our mouth. We used to soak and rinse our beans several times before cooking, and our grains, or soak grains in a yogurt or similar.......or peel and seed tomatos and peppers.....

Apparently raw dairy has a bettter componemt profile that aids in digestion and better health because some components are protective against the dairy.

Im learning A1 v A2 milks---holy cow. lol A1 is a recent genetic change and produced by the prefered high producing Holsteins; the A2 is in a few other breeds like the Jersey who is a small cow with high butterfat but not the commercial powerhouse the Holstein it; also goats and sheep are A2.

I am no expert. But these effects make sense to me.
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  #29   ^
Old Sat, Jul-07-18, 09:49
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
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Posts: 8,242
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 31%
Location: Massachusetts
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from Mayo CLinic

Quote:
Causes
Diverticula usually develop when naturally weak places in your colon give way under pressure. This causes marble-sized pouches to protrude through the colon wall.

Diverticulitis occurs when diverticula tear, resulting in inflammation or infection or both.


When I look at the risk factors isted below I see issues caused by SAD

Quote:
Risk factors
Several factors may increase your risk of developing diverticulitis:

Aging. The incidence of diverticulitis increases with age.
Obesity. Being seriously overweight increases your odds of developing diverticulitis. Morbid obesity may increase your risk of needing more-invasive treatments for diverticulitis.
Smoking. People who smoke cigarettes are more likely than nonsmokers to experience diverticulitis.
Lack of exercise. Vigorous exercise appears to lower your risk of diverticulitis.
Diet high in animal fat and low in fiber, although the role of low fiber alone isn't clear.
Certain medications. Several drugs are associated with an increased risk of diverticulitis, including steroids, opiates and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and naproxen (Aleve).
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  #30   ^
Old Sat, Jul-07-18, 09:53
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 8,242
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/218/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 31%
Location: Massachusetts
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these are Med MD recommendations, but again these are supperficial .....

Quote:
Here are some tips:

Eat more fiber by adding whole-grain breads, oatmeal, bran cereals, fibrous fresh fruits, and vegetables to your diet. However, take care to add fiber gradually. A sudden switch to a high-fiber diet can cause bloating and gas.
Bulk up your diet by adding an over-the-counter preparation containing psyllium, derived from the plant Plantago psyllium. You can also try ground psyllium seed: Once a day, add 1 teaspoon ground psyllium seed over any cold liquid and drink within a few minutes of preparing, before the mixture gels.
Drink plenty of fluids (at least eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day) if you increase your intake of fiber.
Avoid refined foods, such as white flour, white rice, and other processed foods.
Prevent constipation by trying over-the-counter stool softeners. However, don't use suppositories or laxatives for constipation on a long-term basis without consulting your doctor. Prunes, prune juice, and psyllium seed are all good natural laxatives. Specially formulated teas to fight constipation are available in health food stores, but some may be very strong, so use them only as directed. Avoid products containing senna (Cassia senna), which is an especially strong herbal laxative and can be habit forming. Also, senna can cause staining of the lining of the colon, which may result in a condition called melanosis coli. Polyethylene glycol (MiraLax) is a useful laxative for short-term use in constipation. Prescription drugs, such as Amitiza, are available for long-term constipation. Talk to your doctor about these medications.
Exercise regularly. Exercise can help the muscles in your intestine retain their tone, which encourages regular bowel movements. If you have the urge to move your bowels, don't delay or ignore it.
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