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  #1   ^
Old Mon, Feb-26-18, 06:45
JLx's Avatar
JLx JLx is offline
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Location: Michigan U.P., USA
Default No Downturn In Obesity Among U.S. Kids, Report Finds

Hopes were dashed this week that the United States was finally making progress in the fight against childhood obesity...

Quote:
Contrary to previous reports, the epidemic of fat has not abated. In fact, there's been a big jump in obesity among the nation's youngest children, according to the latest analysis of federal data, published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.

"The main take-home message for me is that, clearly, obesity remains a problem," says Asheley Skinner, an associate professor of population health services at Duke University and leader of the analysis. "It's not improving."

Childhood obesity rates have been rising for decades, sparking widespread alarm among public health researchers and officials. Obese children tend to become obese adults, who are prone to many health problems, including cancer, heart disease and diabetes. ...

In fact, the scientists say, there was a disturbingly large increase in obesity among the youngest children — ages 2 to 5 years old. In that age group, obesity increased from about 9 percent to almost 14 percent.

"It is a big jump," Skinner says. "That's the highest level of obesity that we've seen in 2- to 5-year olds since 1999." ...

In an editorial accompanying the study, Dr. David Ludwig of Boston Children's Hospital calls for a more comprehensive national strategy for fighting the problem.

"We haven't generated a truly systematic or comprehensive approach across society that addresses all drivers of childhood obesity — poor diet, a lack of physical activity and a healthy food supply that will encourage everyone to eat well," Ludwig says. "We need a truly national, comprehensive strategy to tackle this epidemic."

https://www.npr.org/sections/health...ds-report-finds


The link to the editorial by Dr. Ludwig isn't actually an editorial by Dr. Ludwig, and I can't find it elsewhere, but I expect we'll be hearing more about all this in the future.

Children as young as 2 being obese - epigenetics, pregnant women being obese?

I couldn't help but think of another article I read recently about obesity in teenagers affecting "military readiness", (political so I won't link it) but summed up in this CDC report, which is from Oct. 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivit...it-to-serve.pdf

I recall a poster from the 70s that said, "What if they gave a war and nobody came?" Back then, we wouldn't have reckoned on a time when perhaps nobody could come. I'm always struck by the photos of Vietnam when I see them, at how scrawny the soldiers were.

Given the amount of money of our country's annual budget that goes towards the military, perhaps they will be the galvanizing force to make some needed policy changes?

All that aside, I feel really sad for all the little kids and teenagers today dealing with the obesity problem. So much conflicting information floating around, for one thing.
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  #2   ^
Old Mon, Feb-26-18, 07:15
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teaser teaser is online now
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Interesting picture of a kid eating a healthy snack at that link. Looks like yogurt, puffed rice cereal, and strawberries. Probably too much to hope that it's not sugary yogurt.

I searched for the Ludwig editorial, got this;

http://pediatrics.aappublications.o.../peds.2017-4078

Link works in preview for me, at least.

edited to add--it's pay to view, so probably won't give any more information than we already have to most of us.

Last edited by teaser : Mon, Feb-26-18 at 07:21.
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  #3   ^
Old Mon, Feb-26-18, 07:18
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teaser teaser is online now
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Plan: mostly milkfat
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Quote:
Melinda Sothern, director of behavioral & community health sciences at Louisiana State University, suggests that trend may be the result of a "perfect storm" of stress, which, when combined with a "lack of access to healthy foods and opportunities for outdoor play," can affect biology on a genetic level.


I hadn't realized puffed cereal was in such short supply.
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  #4   ^
Old Mon, Feb-26-18, 07:46
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bkloots bkloots is offline
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Based on current events, I think we are beginning to observe "stress" among children as a major factor in many health issues, mental and physical, including obesity. We're seeing the consequences of screen exposure to a great deal of violence and anxiety that NO previous generation has experienced. This is increasing in countries worldwide, as is obesity.

What do you think?
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  #5   ^
Old Mon, Feb-26-18, 07:59
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
Interesting picture of a kid eating a healthy snack at that link. Looks like yogurt, puffed rice cereal, and strawberries. Probably too much to hope that it's not sugary yogurt.

I searched for the Ludwig editorial, got this;

http://pediatrics.aappublications.o.../peds.2017-4078

Link works in preview for me, at least.

edited to add--it's pay to view, so probably won't give any more information than we already have to most of us.


Clicked Download .pdf under title...the full 2 page op-ed and companion opened with references.
http://pediatrics.aappublications.o.../peds.2017-3459


Quote:
"We have known about this epidemic of childhood obesity — and have been pouring research dollars and public health dollars into this problem — for at least 20 years," says Dr. Sarah Armstrong, an associate professor of pediatrics at Duke who helped conduct the analysis. "And despite that, we don't seem to be making a big dent in the situation."

"We need to double down our efforts and find out what's going to work," she says, "or the health of our future generation is really in jeopardy."


After seven years in the low-carb world, it drives me crazy when I see academics at Duke and the other NC universities (that is everyone who authored this study**), and also particularly Kelly Brownell, who just can't figure out how kids have gotten so fat and are clueless how to fix it! Get yourself over to the community clinic where Dr. Westman has been treating obesity for 20 years.

And if it drives me crazy, I'm surprised Dr. Westman remains as calm as he does.


**Departments of aPopulation Health Sciences and cPediatrics, and dDuke Center for Childhood Obesity Research, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina; bDuke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, North Carolina; Departments of eDivision of Public Health Sciences, Epidemiology and Prevention and fPediatrics, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina; and Brenner Families In Training Program, Brenner Children’s Hospital, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Last edited by JEY100 : Mon, Feb-26-18 at 08:32.
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  #6   ^
Old Mon, Feb-26-18, 08:07
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JLx JLx is offline
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Thanks, Janet. That worked, and here's the PDF by Dr. Ludwig:

http://pediatrics.aappublications.o...7-4078.full.pdf
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  #7   ^
Old Mon, Feb-26-18, 09:33
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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The fear of meat and fat has resulted in children who eat nothing but carbs. All day.
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  #8   ^
Old Mon, Feb-26-18, 10:33
PaCarolSue PaCarolSue is offline
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I think the main problem is that kids eat the way other people in their environment eat. You usually see overweight kids with overweight parents. Young children have no way of getting themselves to McDonald's. Someone takes them or brings the food into the home. If they are hungry, they will eat what's in the home. The exception is those with true glandular/metabolic medical conditions.

When I was growing up, I can't really recall many overweight kids in my neighborhood or school. In my family, the only time we ate was at mealtime...nothing in between or in the evening. There was no snack food in our house. Everything was whole food, cooked from scratch. We had cake when it was someone's birthday. It just didn't enter our minds to eat at any other time. And we ran and played all day out side.
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  #9   ^
Old Mon, Feb-26-18, 11:00
Nrracing Nrracing is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bkloots
Based on current events, I think we are beginning to observe "stress" among children as a major factor in many health issues, mental and physical, including obesity. We're seeing the consequences of screen exposure to a great deal of violence and anxiety that NO previous generation has experienced. This is increasing in countries worldwide, as is obesity.

What do you think?

I think you are spot on bkloots. I have a niece that is a mess and she has been that way since she was young. I have never seen a young kid express about how she is nervous, and cries if you say they wrong thing to her, melt down, feeling get hurt so bad, and seeing a shrink since age of 8.

I truly think it's the all the junk and food she eats, but her parents have medicated her, since then she has gained weight that you can notice. that is a side effect. Its sad.


From what I can see there is just so much more junk, cheap junk available for kids to eat. when a bag of healthy fresh veggies or fruit cost my the 10 boxes or little debbie/pop tarts, parents are going to low cost item is money is tight.

I was a bigger kid, but was in marching band, rode bikes, and my parents cooked what was in the house. We ate it or we would be hungry. we also did not have screen to eat the brain.
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  #10   ^
Old Mon, Feb-26-18, 12:47
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
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Yes, it drives many of us crazy that these "experts" cannot figure out the root cause of obesity. These poor kids have been raised to develop an addiction to processed carbs at a very early age, and no one can figure out why? Unfortunately, our SAD has become the new normal, and when you look at the increased weight that the average person carries around compared to 60 years ago, it is stunning. The brainwashing of "nutritional facts" that contribute to people's fears of healthy fat and the embracing of "heart healthy" foods contributes to a cognitive dissonance that prevents people from thinking for themselves and looking for an alternative. They are told that alternatives like LCHF, Keto, and Paleo are unhealthy, unsustainable, and risk permanent damage when the very SAD diet most are consuming is doing just that. I heard a medical doctor and a registered dietician say just that on Sirius/XM's Doctor Radio just the other day. Incredible . . .
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  #11   ^
Old Mon, Feb-26-18, 15:22
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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I know I keep going back to what I see at work, but it's amazing to me the things you see in the grocery store. If you want to see how people really eat, look at what's in their grocery cart.

Or look at what they eat or feed their kids while in the store - because it seems few people can make it through a grocery shopping trip these days without eating while they're shopping.

The store has set out a basket of fruit (clementines and bananas) for children under age 10 to eat while in the store. Adults ignore the sign that says the fruit is for children, and only look at the FREE part, so they often grab them too, because they're just as hungry as the little kids. We have a "kids corner" with a little table, coloring books, etc to keep little kids entertained while the parents check out. They also have free access in the kids corner to little packets of "healthy" fruit snacks - the gummy stuff that's mostly sugar with a tiny bit of fruit juice to give it a healthy aura.

I know it's a big store, but really, we never ate in the grocery store when I was a kid. Nowadays, it's free fruit when you first walk in the door, samples of carrots and dip in produce, cookies in the bakery, string cheese in dairy, so you can eat your way through the store. The in-house Starbucks even offers samples of their sugary drinks, and baked goods - one time they took a bunch of leftover cake-pops and handed them out to kids all over the store.

Parents of toddlers will also bring a bag or container of "healthy" cereal such as cheerios, or those stupid Gerber (or is it Beech Nut?) puffs to feed their starving kids while they're shopping. Some will grab a bunch of those squeeze pouches of fruit goo while shopping, and give one to their toddler to suck on in the store. Or give them a juice box from the multipack that they're buying. Donuts rarely make it to checkout without at least a few bites out of them.

Never mind that despite the fact that this is a fairly large store, most shopping trips don't even last 30 minutes - the kids are hungry, and no one is going to tell them to wait until they get home. Heck, the parents are hungry too - they'll eat stuff while shopping too.

It occurred to me the other day that we've become a nation of infants, because eating mostly carbs, we can't go more than 2 hours without a feeding. Actually, if what I see in the store is any indication, most people can't seem to go more than about 30 minutes without a feeding.
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  #12   ^
Old Tue, Feb-27-18, 04:01
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Nor in the UK.
A UK Cancer research group starting an awareness campaign of the links between obesity and cancer.

Millennials will be most overweight generation since records began, cancer experts warn

Government must act to prevent 'horrifying' prediction becoming reality

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/h...h-a8227986.html
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  #13   ^
Old Tue, Feb-27-18, 05:25
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
I know I keep going back to what I see at work, but it's amazing to me the things you see in the grocery store. If you want to see how people really eat, look at what's in their grocery cart.


I find your grocery store insights to be fascinating.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
It occurred to me the other day that we've become a nation of infants, because eating mostly carbs, we can't go more than 2 hours without a feeding. Actually, if what I see in the store is any indication, most people can't seem to go more than about 30 minutes without a feeding.


I don't know how many people understand real hunger as distinct from screaming blood sugar.
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  #14   ^
Old Tue, Feb-27-18, 07:06
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
I don't know how many people understand real hunger as distinct from screaming blood sugar.


I know I sure didn't all those years when I was eating so many carbs. I couldn't understand how anyone could go without snacks between meals. I couldn't understand how anyone could eat just a couple of potato chips or cookies and not end up scarfing down the entire package. I couldn't understand why everyone else was not as horribly, desperately hungry as I was, because the hunger just got worse and worse, the longer I tried to postpone eating. (Longer being a relative term - trying to go 3 or 4 hours instead of 2 hours) It was a gnawing hungry, the kind where you would eat almost anything, even something you hated - just to try to fill what felt like an enormous empty hole in your stomach.

Nowadays when I get hungry, it's so mild that I can ignore it for hours, and often do. One of the things about working on the front end of the grocery store is that I can never take a break when I feel like it - they need to have sufficient coverage to handle the lines of customers at checkout, so I can't just walk away from my post. If we're scheduled to work 8 hours, we're supposed to get a 15 minute break and a 1/2 hour lunch break. I never know when either break will occur during my day - or even IF they'll happen at all on any given day, because working self scan is different from regular register, and some days there's no one else available who has been trained on self scan. So when I get a break, I eat something, but generally I'm not really hungry - The only reason I eat when I get the chance to do so, is that I don't want to go the entire 8 hours without eating anything at all (actually it ends up being 8-1/2 if I don't get that unpaid lunch break), because after about 6 hours, I start to get a little shaky, light headed and/or head-achy. Being a self-scan attendant, I can't leave for the day until my relief shows up either - employees often show up late, and that's assuming the scheduling manager didn't inadvertently leave a big gap in the schedule on self scan. There have been times over the years when I worked 9-1/2 hours straight, with no break at all because there was a 1 hour gap between scheduled attendants. It's not at all enjoyable on LC because of the eventual shakiness and headache, but I can hack it ok. However, back in my high carb days, I would have personified the very definition of "hangry", because I would have been monstrously hungry, and desperate to eat.

To me, after so many years of that being how I defined hunger, that's set in my mind as being what true hunger feels like, which is probably why I can so easily ignore the mild hunger I get now. It's two entirely different feelings, one desperate, the other being "oh that's annoying, maybe I should think about getting something to eat when I get a chance".

Sadly, most people are going around in that screaming blood sugar state when they're hungry - they just have no idea that's not normal hunger. Most young adults, being raised on HCLF, have probably always experienced hunger as screaming blood sugar, rather than a mildly hungry state that can be ignored for a few more hours.

Today's young kids are not going to have it any better, unless the recommended dietary advice soon changes to reducing carbs significantly, and increasing dietary fats - and considering that increasing numbers of kids are being labeled obese, they're probably already suffering from metabolic syndrome, and therefore will need to reduce carbs far more than will ever be officially recommended.
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  #15   ^
Old Tue, Feb-27-18, 07:33
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cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
I know I sure didn't all those years when I was eating so many carbs. I couldn't understand how anyone could go without snacks between meals. I couldn't understand how anyone could eat just a couple of potato chips or cookies and not end up scarfing down the entire package. I couldn't understand why everyone else was not as horribly, desperately hungry as I was, because the hunger just got worse and worse, the longer I tried to postpone eating. (Longer being a relative term - trying to go 3 or 4 hours instead of 2 hours) It was a gnawing hungry, the kind where you would eat almost anything, even something you hated - just to try to fill what felt like an enormous empty hole in your stomach.



That was exactly my experience. I was ravenously hungry and didn't understand how people managed to control their eating. I felt I was horribly defective in this regard and all the time it was the high carbs I was consuming. It is sad that so many people do not understand this.

Jean
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