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  #1   ^
Old Thu, Feb-08-18, 04:48
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Plan: mostly milkfat
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Default CoQ10 and insulin resistance

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...80207110109.htm

Quote:
Simple molecule could prevent, alleviate pre-diabetes
Pre-diabetes risk increased by coenzyme Q10 deficiency

Levels of CoQ and the presence of insulin resistance were analysed in a range of experimental laboratory settings, mouse models and samples from humans, as part of an ambitious research collaboration conducted with the University of Sydney, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Genentech Inc. and the University of New South Wales.

Concentrations of CoQ were found to be lower in insulin resistant body fat and muscle tissue. When the researchers replenished CoQ, insulin resistance or pre-diabetes was reversed.

Co-author Dr Daniel Fazakerley from the University of Sydney's School of Life and Environmental Science and Charles Perkins Centre said CoQ provides a vital role in converting nutrients like fat and sugar into usable energy.

"CoQ is found in mitochondria, the power plants in the cells of our body, where it is required for the flow of electricity to the cell's 'motor' which is responsible for energy production," he explained.

"Energy production can also generate reactive chemical species -- often referred to as 'reactive oxygen species' or 'oxidants' -- as by-products, which can be damaging to cells.

"Previous studies have shown that these oxidants can cause insulin resistance. Our study has found that lower mitochondrial CoQ enhanced oxidant formation by mitochondria.

"Importantly, by replenishing CoQ in mitochondria, either in cells or in animals, we were able to restore 'normal' mitochondrial oxidants and reverse insulin resistance."

Published in eLife today, the research provides a missing link in our understanding of how changes in our diet can trigger insulin resistance, said co-lead author Professor David James, Leonard P. Ullmann Chair of Metabolic Systems Biology at the University of Sydney's Charles Perkins Centre.

"Eating a high fat, high sugar diet has long been known to be a major risk factor for obesity and pre-diabetes and our latest work brings us one step closer to understanding how and why," Professor James explained.

Co-lead author Professor Roland Stocker from the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute and the University of New South Wales added that the findings provide direction for potential future treatments for insulin resistance and pre-diabetes.

"Replenishing CoQ could prove an invaluable preventive measure for insulin resistance- or pre-diabetes-linked diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancers and dementia," he said.

"However, oral CoQ supplements may not effectively restore mitochondrial CoQ due to its low absorption," Professor Stocker explained.

"This work has provided an impetus for us to find alternate means of increasing CoQ in mitochondria to treat insulin resistance and pre-diabetes. If not an external supplement, perhaps we can stimulate the body to form more of the coenzyme itself -- or find ways to prevent levels from lowering in the first place."


Obvious possible tie-in here between statins and diabetes.

Blood lipids as a proxy for synthesis of other essential lipid byproducts is interesting.
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  #2   ^
Old Thu, Feb-08-18, 05:10
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is online now
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
Obvious possible tie-in here between statins and diabetes.


Obvious possible tie-in here between statins and death in general.
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  #3   ^
Old Thu, Feb-08-18, 20:14
Zei Zei is offline
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Default

Pretty sorry how statins are deliberately prescribed to people because they have diabetes. I was offered one. NO THANKS! I need my CoQ10, ketones, muscles, heart, and life!
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  #4   ^
Old Fri, Feb-09-18, 05:39
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is online now
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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The Keys-backed Lipid Theory was based on shoddy science, so how long before the statins, which are based on that theory, will come off the market?

The world is supposed to work that way, we flatter ourselves.
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  #5   ^
Old Fri, Feb-09-18, 12:15
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
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Default

These are the two lines that got my attention:
Quote:
"Replenishing CoQ could prove an invaluable preventive measure for insulin resistance- or pre-diabetes-linked diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancers and dementia," he said.

"However, oral CoQ supplements may not effectively restore mitochondrial CoQ due to its low absorption," Professor Stocker explained.

Right, first reaction is to make sure we are stocked up on CoQ10 supplements. Awww, not so fast, as they are anecdotally described as being characterized by low absorption with the "may not effectively" caveat.
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  #6   ^
Old Fri, Feb-09-18, 12:23
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Plan: mostly milkfat
Stats: 190/152.4/154 Male 67inches
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Default

Yup. With the live mouse study, they injected the CoQ10. Maybe you could get some effects with very large oral doses, but the stuff's so expensive as it is.
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  #7   ^
Old Fri, Feb-09-18, 14:40
kckc5353 kckc5353 is offline
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Plan: LCHF/Keto/CKD
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
Yup. With the live mouse study, they injected the CoQ10. Maybe you could get some effects with very large oral doses, but the stuff's so expensive as it is.



I've been seeing this article everywhere. It's interesting, but the mechanism isn't fully explained. Did the insulin resistance lead to low CoQ10, or the other way around?

I think they can make more money from a drug that helps increase CoQ10 levels vs recommending CoQ10 supplements. They fail to mention that water and fat-soluble ubiquinol can bring blood levels up pretty darn high.
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  #8   ^
Old Fri, Feb-09-18, 16:47
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is offline
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Plan: Paleoish
Stats: 225/175/175 Male 71.5 inches
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Location: Longmont, Colorado
Default

There has been quite a bit of research on CoQ10.

http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/diet...rs/coenzyme-Q10
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  #9   ^
Old Fri, Feb-09-18, 23:57
M Levac M Levac is offline
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Plan: VLC, mostly meat
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Default

OK, watch this.

It's not just about CoQ10, it's also about ROS and obviously about antioxidants. Well, ketones are powerful antioxidants. Check this out: https://www.sciencedirect.com/scien...014488608000101

Doesn't stop there. Based on my paradigm (sorry, I forgot who exactly gave me the following idea, but it's fairly recent), ketones activate insulin receptors in the liver, which in turn means the absence of ketones is the proximal cause (i.e. the immediate mechanism) of insulin resistance. The primary cause, of course, is a high-carb diet. It's exquisitely ironic that we test for insulin resistance with an oral glucose tolerance test.

The point is ketones take care of ROS when there's too much ROS. Then, when ketones aren't there, well, they don't take care of any ROS, excess or otherwise. And if it's true that some ROS can cause insulin resistance (more than absence of ketones), we get a runaway effect.

Never mind CoQ10 at this point. It's just so much easier to fix the ketones problem. It's probably also gonna fix about 90% of the CoQ10 problem, ya know, while we're there.
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  #10   ^
Old Sat, Feb-10-18, 03:57
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is online now
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Default

Don't we get CoQ10 from meat? Even though meat will kill us? /sarcasm
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  #11   ^
Old Sat, Feb-10-18, 04:23
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cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Plan: very low carb real food
Stats: 245/128/135 Female 62
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Location: Vermont
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
Don't we get CoQ10 from meat? Even though meat will kill us? /sarcasm


It's absurd that meat, which contains necessary nutrients not found in sufficient quantities in other substances, are demonized as health risks. As we all know B12 is only found in meats and CoQ10 is found primarily in meats and in greatest abundance in animal hearts which is why I eat heart regularly. I grind it up and stir fry it with vegetables.

Jean
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  #12   ^
Old Sat, Feb-10-18, 08:00
Zei Zei is offline
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Posts: 1,326
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
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Progress: 34%
Location: Texas
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by M Levac
OK, watch this.

It's not just about CoQ10, it's also about ROS and obviously about antioxidants. Well, ketones are powerful antioxidants. Check this out: https://www.sciencedirect.com/scien...014488608000101

Doesn't stop there. Based on my paradigm (sorry, I forgot who exactly gave me the following idea, but it's fairly recent), ketones activate insulin receptors in the liver, which in turn means the absence of ketones is the proximal cause (i.e. the immediate mechanism) of insulin resistance. The primary cause, of course, is a high-carb diet. It's exquisitely ironic that we test for insulin resistance with an oral glucose tolerance test.

The point is ketones take care of ROS when there's too much ROS. Then, when ketones aren't there, well, they don't take care of any ROS, excess or otherwise. And if it's true that some ROS can cause insulin resistance (more than absence of ketones), we get a runaway effect.

Never mind CoQ10 at this point. It's just so much easier to fix the ketones problem. It's probably also gonna fix about 90% of the CoQ10 problem, ya know, while we're there.

Yes, it should considering ketones and CoQ10 are both produced via the same
HMG-CoA reductase pathway. Get that up and running right and you should have plenty of both, along with cholesterol and other life-giving substances this pathway is responsible for making. A really insidious thing about statins is they deliberately target this pathway, cutting back our ability to produce all of these highly valuable and necessary substances, all in the name of the old discredited cholesterol-causes-heart-disease myth. Scary!
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