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  #1   ^
Old Wed, Jan-24-18, 11:51
locarb4avr locarb4avr is offline
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Default Dietary fiber protects against obesity and metabolic syndrome, study finds

They still made mistakes, ie "The high-fat diet is linked to an increase in obesity and conditions associated with metabolic syndrome." It should be "High Carb Diet."

Dietary fiber protects against obesity and metabolic syndrome, study finds

Easy read
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...80122184723.htm

Consumption of dietary fiber can prevent obesity, metabolic syndrome and adverse changes in the intestine by promoting growth of "good" bacteria in the colon, according to a study led by Georgia State University.



Original paper
http://www.cell.com/cell-host-micro...Fshowall%3Dtrue

Highlights
•The fermentable fiber inulin prevented high-fat diet (HFD)-induced metabolic syndrome

•HFD enriched with inulin increased gut epithelial proliferation, prevented colon atrophy

•Inulin restored HFD-induced microbiota depletion and microbiota-mucosa separation

•Inulin effects are microbiota and IL-22, but not short-chain fatty acid, dependent
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  #2   ^
Old Wed, Jan-24-18, 14:30
Zei Zei is offline
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Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
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Progress: 34%
Location: Texas
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In mice a high fat lab chow does increase obesity/symptoms of metabolic disorder because mice are built to naturally consume a low fat diet. A mistake some researchers may make is to assume (due to decades of inappropriate demonizing of fat in human diet) that harms of high fat chow to mice will equally apply to high fat consumption in humans. Not so. Humans respond very differently to dietary fat than do mice. In a sense kind of like saying broccoli would do great harm to humans because it makes lions (obligate carnivore) sick. Or that because force feeding animal cholesterol to totally herbivore rabbits messes them up (yeah, that study was done) therefore humans (or maybe lions, tigers and bears, oh my!) shouldn't eat cholesterol either? So okay, after accounting for the different means needed to produce metabolic disorder/obesity in differing species (human+high grain "mouse" food=obesity?), the effect of fiber on that metabolic disorder is a curiosity, that is, will humans also benefit? And are we talking adding a refined fiber product to a highly refined food-like human diet suspiciously reminiscent of better tasting lab chow, sort of like they did with these little mouse guys? Who knows, could be some benefit there for humans adding commercial fiber-in-a-bottle to refined typical diet. Really, there could be.
Although I'll personally pass and just keep eating a whole foods real human diet with fiber that comes along for the ride.
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  #3   ^
Old Wed, Jan-24-18, 15:26
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teaser teaser is offline
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Plan: mostly milkfat
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I would like to see a study looking at a ketogenic or just low carb diet with or without soluble fiber. In mice, even very cheap psyllium fiber seems to be of benefit in some studies.
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  #4   ^
Old Wed, Jan-24-18, 21:14
Zei Zei is offline
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Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
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I've seen numerous anecdotal accounts of people doing zero carb/all animal foods diets who seem to be doing quite well without fiber or plants. Not what I would have expected with all the claims we need fiber to feed our gut microbiota. Maybe we don't?
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  #5   ^
Old Thu, Jan-25-18, 04:10
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zei
I've seen numerous anecdotal accounts of people doing zero carb/all animal foods diets who seem to be doing quite well without fiber or plants. Not what I would have expected with all the claims we need fiber to feed our gut microbiota. Maybe we don't?


Since going gluten-free and healing my guts, I have become quite fiber sensitive, and eat very little of it. I have long thought that the obsession with fiber is connected with the official encouragements to eat wallpaper paste -- oh wait, I meant hearthealthywholegrains.

And back when I did eat gluten now and then, on a low carb diet, like low carb wraps, it seemed to trigger constipation.
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  #6   ^
Old Thu, Jan-25-18, 09:41
khrussva's Avatar
khrussva khrussva is offline
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Plan: My own - < 30 net carbs
Stats: 440/205/210 Male 5' 11"
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Location: Central Virginia - USA
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When I was still insulin resistant I found that I was reactive quite hypoglycemic. I could have wild blood sugar swings even after eating a low carb meal (8 to 10 net carbs). I learned that I did better with raw veggies vs. cooked or pureed in soups. Sauces with even a few carbs could spike and crash my BG within 30 minutes. This erratic overreaction to carbs was, I believe, the driving force behind my cravings and near constant desire to eat. Adding fiber to my diet leveled out my BG response and I gained greater satiety between meals. I have made a habit of taking psyillium powder in water before each meal. With more stable BG I stopped snacking between meals, so in that regard fiber seemed to help. I ate less. After my insulin resistance improved, I noticed that I was much less likely to have wild blood sugar swings after a meal - even from eating more carbs that usual. I was still eating plenty of fiber and even a 25 net carb meal would result in a slow rise and fall in BG.

More recently I've lowered my carbs to a deeper keto level of eating (less than 15 to 20 net carbs most days). I've cut way back on the fiber as well. My BG remains good and my satiety between meals has never been better.

So for me fiber helped more when I was insulin resistant. Fiber helps if I'm eating lots of easily digestible carbs. But being insulin sensitive and eating ketogenic levels of carbs I'm not sure that I need to be supplementing with fiber at all. It really doesn't do anything but feed my gut biome. And as far as I'm concerned, too much credit is given to a 'healthy gut biome' in the fight against obesity. What really constitutes a healthy gut biome? Where's the proof?
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  #7   ^
Old Thu, Jan-25-18, 11:30
Grav Grav is online now
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Plan: Banting
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My biggest worry about stories like this is that they could be used to justify people's position on why bread is "a staple food and you're harming your health by not getting enough fibre, that's why it's at the bottom of the food pyramid" etc.

Yes, foods like bread are relatively high in fibre, and yes, some amount of fibre is beneficial. But it's important to have a little perspective when it comes to issues of the scale of fibre, and by that I mean I don't think it's a huge deal for most people as long as they're eating real food. Plenty of fibre in those vegetables as well, you know?

Saying we should be eating bread for the fibre is a bit like saying we should be eating lots of fruit for the antioxidants. Yes, but they're too high in sugar as well; you're effectively getting oxidants with your antioxidants.

I guess I'm just saying I see fibre as a piece of the food puzzle, but there are dangers in focusing too much on that piece at the expense of the other pieces when choosing what to eat.
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  #8   ^
Old Thu, Jan-25-18, 12:23
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Posts: 12,907
 
Plan: mostly milkfat
Stats: 190/152.4/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 104%
Location: Ontario
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If I see a study on benefits of cereal fiber, to make up some numbers, 90 times out of ten it's epidemiology. An intervention study that shows any benefit, mouse or human, again made up but probably close enough, it's some sort of soluble fiber. that's being dealt with. Cellulose fiber that's more common in grains usually gives neutral, sometimes even adverse results. People are busy choking down wheat bran cereals with really crappy evidence. I actually did like some of those cereals, but they were the "adult" version of Count Chocula, very sugary.
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  #9   ^
Old Fri, Jan-26-18, 11:32
locarb4avr locarb4avr is offline
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Posts: 241
 
Plan: My own plan
Stats: 220/138/132 Male 65in
BF:
Progress: 93%
Location: 92646
Default

You should check this out.

Prostate vs High Fat vs Low Fat vs High Carb vs Low Carb...

http://forum.lowcarber.org/showpost...78&postcount=19

I explained why Fat is not the main element controlling our biochemical pathways. It is Carb/Sugar that is in control. I also explained why 'Low Fat diet' created world over weight population.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zei
In mice a high fat lab chow does increase obesity/symptoms of metabolic disorder because mice are built to naturally consume a low fat diet. A mistake some researchers may make is to assume (due to decades of inappropriate demonizing of fat in human diet) that harms of high fat chow to mice will equally apply to high fat consumption in humans. Not so. Humans respond very differently to dietary fat than do mice. In a sense kind of like saying broccoli would do great harm to humans because it makes lions (obligate carnivore) sick. Or that because force feeding animal cholesterol to totally herbivore rabbits messes them up (yeah, that study was done) therefore humans (or maybe lions, tigers and bears, oh my!) shouldn't eat cholesterol either? So okay, after accounting for the different means needed to produce metabolic disorder/obesity in differing species (human+high grain "mouse" food=obesity?), the effect of fiber on that metabolic disorder is a curiosity, that is, will humans also benefit? And are we talking adding a refined fiber product to a highly refined food-like human diet suspiciously reminiscent of better tasting lab chow, sort of like they did with these little mouse guys? Who knows, could be some benefit there for humans adding commercial fiber-in-a-bottle to refined typical diet. Really, there could be.
Although I'll personally pass and just keep eating a whole foods real human diet with fiber that comes along for the ride.
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