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  #1   ^
Old Thu, Jan-18-18, 14:16
mlanemartn mlanemartn is offline
New Member
Posts: 2
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 410/368/250 Male 6'6''
BF:
Progress:
Default Depression during long term weightloss

I have done low carb twice before, both times I quit doing it. The first time after 8 months, the second after 6 months. Both times I was really successful with my weight loss, but I quickly gained the weight back when I stopped. Last year I reached my heaviest weight ever, 410 lbs. This was a wake up call for me. I had managed to stay around 375 for several years without gaining any weight, but when I realized I was over 400 lbs, I knew it wouldn't stop there. In addition to that, I recently found out my dad was diagnosed with Diabetes (type 2), and he told me for the first time that my grandfather had it too. More wake up calls. Of course I didn't want to be over 400 lbs, and I dreading going back on Atkins. But after trying low calorie, weight watchers, lose it, slimfast, and various other diets, the only real success I've ever had was with Atkins.

I went back into it and it wasn't even that hard. The pounds started dropping off quickly, I was relieved when I was under 400 lbs. Now I'm down to 368, I've lost 42 lbs. Yay, but also I know I have a long way to go if I'm going to get down to 250. The scariest thing is, I know that even when I get down to my goal, I have to keep doing low carb. I've never successfully kept the weight off in any of the diets I've ever done. Even the last time I did it, I did low carb for 6 months and lost 65 lbs, I gave speeches to my friends that it was a lifestyle change and I would never go back to my old ways. But I got tired of it, got complacent, and went back to eating entire pizzas by myself and three cheeseburgers at a time. In addition to worrying about diabetes, I worry about heart disease a lot too because my eating habits were atrocious.

I'm committed to sticking with the diet, I keep telling my wife, if only I can hold out until I'm 250, if only I can stick with it. I haven't weighed that much since high school (I'm 37). But I also know that is a flawed way of thinking. If I EVER go back to my old habits, I'll be up to 410 again in no time, and if the pattern follows, probably gain even more. But I've started to get super bored with my diet. I've tried to incorporate more variety in the diet this time, trying new recipes, not just eating chicken salads and scrambled eggs every day, and it's gone pretty well. But I'm no chef, and after 4 months doing this, I'm feeling very depressed. It's not that hard to imagine sticking with this for another year and getting down to my goal. I know I can do it. The trouble I'm having is visualizing my life after that.

I miss pizza, I miss junk food and pasta and all my favorite comfort foods. I've struggled with depression all my life and I have definitely without a doubt used food to cheer myself up. It's probably the main reason I'm fat, although my metabolism never did me any favors. I've always avoided antidepressants because I know several people who, after trying them gained a lot of weight, and they had both been skinny before that. For me, meds that HELP me to gain weight is a death sentence because I have a hard enough time without it. Also, I know from past experience that the closer I am to my goal, the happier I will be. A lot of my depression stems from low self esteem, and when I see the pounds drop off, I start to feel really good. When I'm not ashamed to look in the mirror, I can walk out the door with a smile on my face.

But the idea of NEVER going back to my pizza eating ways. I start to have thoughts like, "what's the point of life then?" Yeah I know how dumb that sounds. But I'm an addict. I read those articles that food addiction can be as powerful as drug addiction and I believe it. I was a binge eater. I would eat pizza and chocolate until I felt physically ill. I couldn't stop myself. If the food was in the house, I would eat it until it was gone. How can I ever really change? How can I keep the weight off. It's so discouraging know that, when I reach my "goal" the journey is just beginning, and if I EVER screw up, if I'm ever weak, I'll just gain it all back. I know I will, I've done it before.

I guess I'm just posting to hear anyone's advice on how to stick with the diet long term, how to be happy without binge eating comfort foods. I google this stuff all the time and I've read tons of forum posts before, but this is my first time posting. Here's hoping you guys have some good suggestions. Thanks for reading.
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  #2   ^
Old Thu, Jan-18-18, 18:45
nawchem's Avatar
nawchem nawchem is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 8,184
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 163.5/156.0/149.0 Female 62
BF:36/27.7/27.3
Progress: 52%
Default

I remember watching a movie with my mom about 6 months after she quit smoking, someone was smoking in the film. Suddenly crying she said she had lost her best friend cigarettes.

Food is a lot like that to us. I've had black moods only lifted by eating a lot of chocolate. This is the longest I've gone without a return to those foods. I have eaten too much whip cream, hazelnut spread, blueberries and green beans! If you feel that need to splurge stuffing yourself on lowcarb works!

Use diabetes to inspire you to health. There are great examples on this board khrussva tells us those craving take a long to die but that they will go away someday. There's a recipe called meatza that's a decent sub for pizza. Teenagers boys have gourged themselved on it and say its great!

You might notice that you gets these craving when your blood sugar is going down. It doesn't have to be low to trigger hormones that message you need food and your stomach doesn't have to be empty either. We have messed up bodies, but you're smarter. Eat something lowcarb when it happens. Even a handful of nuts and some patience can work.

You can do this!
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  #3   ^
Old Thu, Jan-18-18, 19:40
cotonpal's Avatar
cotonpal cotonpal is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 3,859
 
Plan: very low carb real food
Stats: 245/128/135 Female 62
BF:
Progress: 106%
Location: Vermont
Default

You need to change the way you think. Tell yourself how fortunate you are that you have found a way to eat that will keep you healthy. Then tell yourself how those foods that you once would eat until you felt sick are not really foods but substances that are toxic to your body. You need to convince yourself 100% that eating low carb is the only healthy way for you to eat. No matter how tempting some other foods may be all they will do is make you sicker and fatter and that's something you don't want. It is essential for you to change the way you are thinking about this

So why are you just eating chicken salads and eggs? How about steak and pork chops and bacon and burgers? Have you checked out dietdoctor.com? Lots of great information there along with meal plans and recipes. Low carb eating does not have to be boring.

Jean
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  #4   ^
Old Thu, Jan-18-18, 22:08
bluej bluej is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 96
 
Plan: LCHF/IF/Vegetarian
Stats: 333/190/125 Female 5'6"
BF:
Progress: 69%
Location: Australia
Default

I have a long term weight loss thing happening too and as hard as it sounds, it can get a wee bit depressing at times in my camp too. Something always cheers me up - reading a forum, looking at my recorded weight loss records, finding my clothes looser on my 'dieting' body (all the while still looking forward to fitting back into my favourite tiny clothes

I miss pizza and bread sometimes too. I find substitutes and it feels so good eating them knowing it's low carb (of course anything with cheese is kind of gauranteed in my house to please me hehe)
This is my favourite recipe that is low carb for pizza
https://yourlighterside.com/2009/05...-pizza-dough-2/

there's also a recipe called revolution rolls - I don't use tartar or splenda and they still taste delicious - they all come out a bit flat which
is good for me because I make cheese sandwiches out of them. One on top and one on the bottom. An eggburger would be mmm

http://www.philly.com/philly/food/r...s/34656554.html

congratulations on your weightloss thus far. That's wonderful
Hope to see you around the board.
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  #5   ^
Old Fri, Jan-19-18, 02:58
Mrs.C's Avatar
Mrs.C Mrs.C is offline
New Member
Posts: 17
 
Plan: ketogenic
Stats: 193/184.2/140 Female 163
BF:
Progress: 17%
Location: Western Australia
Default

Hi. I'm sorry you are going through such an emotional struggle. You know, antidepressants dont always have to mean weight gain. yes some do but there are many many options. A good doctor would be able to recommend one that suits your personal circumstances. But maybe look at the trade off. Yes a bit of weight gain may happen but the peace of mind, the better mood, the better quality sleep, and the general day to day coping will help with your diet and you know this works, the weight wont be around for long! How about counselling? Not being psychoanalysed, but someone to talk to, a safe space to explore your thoughts and feelings. They can give you the emotional toolbox to cope with the feelings you have. Its worth thinking about. There are so many good tasty keto meals online, the variety is endless. Maybe explore a little, try some new exciting recipes, hopefully the food boredom wont last. I wish you all the best and hope you can turn this thought process around a little. Ive only been on this forum a short time but it looks like a place you can come to when you need a little boost, we will all be here for you. Good luck.
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  #6   ^
Old Fri, Jan-19-18, 06:28
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 2,086
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Many of us have had to deal with everything you're describing. You're not unique, but you control the path to success or not.

Quote:
But the idea of NEVER going back to my pizza eating ways. I start to have thoughts like, "what's the point of life then?" Yeah I know how dumb that sounds. But I'm an addict. I read those articles that food addiction can be as powerful as drug addiction and I believe it. I was a binge eater. I would eat pizza and chocolate until I felt physically ill. I couldn't stop myself. If the food was in the house, I would eat it until it was gone. How can I ever really change? How can I keep the weight off. It's so discouraging know that, when I reach my "goal" the journey is just beginning, and if I EVER screw up, if I'm ever weak, I'll just gain it all back. I know I will, I've done it before.

This is key, and you're not alone here as well. Yes, food addiction is very powerful. I'm a reformed carb addict. I developed Insulin Resistance and could eat any amount of carbs without becoming satiated and when I'd cut back, the cravings were the start of withdrawal and called me back. I was on the path to obesity and diabetes with all the associated symptoms starting to develop. That being said, check out this forum, as there are many who have successfully conquered this addiction and now manage their way of eating (WOE) with consistency and purpose. Stop feeling sorry for yourself. In time, you'll have wonderful eating experiences with a varied menu associated with a low carb approach, and during these meals, you'll know when and want to stop. Read about meal timing and the ingredients and foods that are good for you. Check out DietDoctor.com for an excellent resource for food strategies and meal menus. Good luck on your journey!
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  #7   ^
Old Fri, Jan-19-18, 13:35
Grav Grav is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 683
 
Plan: Banting
Stats: 302/187/190 Male 175cm
BF:
Progress: 103%
Location: New Zealand
Default

This is a really interesting post to me, with several aspects that remind me of my own history. For starters, there aren't many guys our age here (I'm 39), and right now I'm working on getting rid of a little rebound weight myself.

You might find the first few posts in my journal interesting. I go through the first 5 months of my own weight loss journey where I'd lost about 50 pounds to that point. By then I figured I had the basics worked out and it was just a matter of time and patience. That was part of the reason I first registered here in the first place, to make sure I had the support I felt I might need to see me the rest of the way there. So just by being here, I can say from my own experience that you've done yourself a favour.

You're on your third go with Atkins now and each time it has worked for you, so at some level you must know that this is what you need to keep eating in order to stay healthy. But of course this conflicts with the idea of never being able to eat some of the things you used to love, like pizza. I remember that feeling and have a few thoughts I can offer.

When I was actively losing, I was tracking my weight on a daily basis, often twice a day. I was able to tell fairly quickly what worked for me and what didn't (my "lucky" meal for example was/is fried salmon and spinach with a side of aioli; I often got a "whoosh" on the scales the next morning after that). There were times though when due to being with friends or when certain "safe" shops were closed, I would have to have something dodgy for lunch, like pizza or fried rice. Whenever that happened, I noticed it on the scales immediately. Every single time the scales would stop moving and basically not start again for 3-4 days, costing me basically half a week of progress. For someone who had been overweight my entire life to this point, seeing and tracking the impact of eating that pizza first hand really reinforced the need for me to be staying away from it whenever possible.

The other thing I picked up after a couple of months was that my appetite began to reduce naturally over time. This was something that I didn't even know would happen at first, but certainly I was glad to learn that appetite control would basically take care of itself. After all, if you're not getting hungry as often, you won't find yourself thinking about any food as often, good or bad.

The third point I can make based on my own experience is to make sure you surround yourself at home with as many healthy food options as possible. In my earlier days I too struggled with both how to cook and what to cook; it took time to build enough of a variety to keep things interesting (and thus sustainable) but I'm more or less there on that front now. Crowd yourself with enough good options that the bad ones just don't even factor into the equation anymore.

I can definitely relate to the visualisation aspect as well. Since my health was a lifelong issue, it occurred to me a number of times that "I don't really know what I look like underneath all of this". But the good news here is that if you stick to this for long enough, you will find out. And to discover yourself in that way is an incredibly uplifting feeling, at least for me.

You've done well with your latest loss so far, so just keep going. Keep reading this forum, keep googling around for meal ideas (Diet Doctor is a good resource), read a few books on the subject, learn whatever you can to help keep your motivated on your journey. And don't beat yourself up if you slip up at some point. Mistakes are a part of the learning process; just understand what happened, how it happened, learn how to avoid repeating it and move on.

Good luck.
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  #8   ^
Old Fri, Jan-19-18, 13:49
mlanemartn mlanemartn is offline
New Member
Posts: 2
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 410/368/250 Male 6'6''
BF:
Progress:
Default

Thanks a lot for the replies, I found them all very encouraging. I will check out the resources and recipes you linked to as well!
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  #9   ^
Old Fri, Jan-19-18, 16:11
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,149
 
Plan: Dr. Bernstein
Stats: 188/160/135 Female 5 ft 4 inches
BF:
Progress: 53%
Location: NE WA
Default

I've gotten a lot of help with Overeaters Anonymous. If you don't care for OA, there are other groups. The main thing, in my opinion, is the group camaraderie & accountability. One of the things I've learned (& don't know if I read it here or at an OA site) is this:

One reason people resist change is because they focus on what they have to give up instead of what they have to gain. (Rick Godwin)

This was brought home to me when I was describing my diet to someone - she sighed & said, "I wish I could eat butter."

So I started thinking about all the food that I can eat & that I love - which is all of it. There is nothing on my LCHF diabetic diet that doesn't taste good. Admittedly, I'm a pretty good cook, but I don't like recipes that call for esoteric ingredients or have an ingredient list longer than my arm. Everything is pretty simple - but delicious.

Yesterday I tried a new recipe for a tuna & vegetable casserole - easy & delicious! Today I made Eggs Florentine, something that is so easy I make it pretty often. Frozen spinach or Swiss chard make it extra easy. I also make a bread substitute with almond flour that's really easy. I made it today & was telling my husband I've gotten lazy. There are lots of different recipes for fake bread but this one is simple, fast, & tasty.

When we have a celebration we always have broiled rib eye. Pricey, but oh so good! I buy it on sale & stash it in the freezer until it's time to celebrate something. But make sure it's high quality meat. I bought some at Walmart that was just awful - the meat was lean! What's the point of low fat rib eye?

You like pizza - there are lots of different lchf recipes with pizza-like taste. My thing is ice cream & I found that sugar-free panna cotta makes a great substitute.

I hope you find some recipes that work for you. Good luck!
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  #10   ^
Old Fri, Jan-19-18, 17:21
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 10,350
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/161/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 84%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie OFS
Yesterday I tried a new recipe for a tuna & vegetable casserole - easy & delicious! Today I made Eggs Florentine, something that is so easy I make it pretty often. Frozen spinach or Swiss chard make it extra easy. I also make a bread substitute with almond flour that's really easy. I made it today & was telling my husband I've gotten lazy. There are lots of different recipes for fake bread but this one is simple, fast, & tasty.


Please share, Bonnie!
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  #11   ^
Old Fri, Jan-19-18, 17:48
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 10,350
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/161/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 84%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mlanemartn
I guess I'm just posting to hear anyone's advice on how to stick with the diet long term, how to be happy without binge eating comfort foods.


You've lost your coping strategy. Which is fine... it was going to kill you after torturing you for years, right? So... you need more and better ones.

I completely believe in food addiction and the effect of carbs on the brain. It's easy and cheap but you "dig your grave with a spoon." And I used to binge. The key to recovery is to realize it has both an emotional, and a physical, component. You have to address both.

Emotional:
  • "I get bored" is an excuse. What did you eat in your old life? I bet it was round after round of the same five or so things. Bingers have their favorites. Foods and combinations that work in the short term. So "bored" is trying to con yourself. It is food. Not drugs. That is why you feel bored. You aren't getting a drug jolt from what you eat.
  • You are eating your feelings. You aren't going to get picked up by the police for driving while eating that sack of fast food, but you are using a drug all the same. Instead of actually grappling with certain things in your life, you are just falling face first into the cheap drug. Start addressing the reasons you want to binge, and revel in the thrill of getting these burdens off your psyche.
  • You have lost your "central purpose." Let's face it, eating this way simplifies a lot of things. Not clothes or self-esteem, but the whole structure of what do you do/how do we have fun/what is there to look forward to/how do I reward myself/how do I soothe myself/how do I compensate for feeling awful? You need new ways of handling all those things. Fun ways. Ways that work so much better.
  • Are you feeling "peer pressure"? Some people, whether they know it consciously or not, feel oppressed by the lack of available food, going out to restaurants, and the constant reminders that a sugar fix is minutes and dollars away and everyone else is enjoying it. If that is the case, you need to work on your priorities. For me, deciding that "I don't eat that anymore" removes the decision process. It is the decision that makes you feel bad and worried that you are missing something.

Physical:
  • You have been starved of nutrients. Carbs not only have few nutrients, they drain your body of your mineral and vitamin stores. Supplement to feel better. I use chromium picolinate to fight cravings and niacin to relieve my anxiety.
  • The sugar roller coaster keeps you unsatisfied. I love focusing on the fact that after my meal, I am actually satiated. I spent years hungry. Now, the freedom from the constant screaming hunger is more soothing than stuffing junk food ever was.
  • Outwit the "ease of use." Make once, eat many times. It's fun to put some songs on, make a big batch of something, and make your own frozen meals. Find a convenience store staple like hard-boiled eggs and dill pickles to have a little treat sometime. I love those Italian cold cuts rolled around mozzarella.
  • Expand your time frame. You cheat when you focus on that first bite. And stop. Push yourself to remember afterward; the overstuffed feeling, the nasty hunger that won't go away, the shame, the misery later.

I love Dr. Fung's book The Obesity Code, and he has a podcast of the same name. Lots of great ideas there about resetting your body.

It is more than just eating low carb. It's revamping your whole life. But isn't that what you want?
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  #12   ^
Old Fri, Jan-19-18, 18:15
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 2,086
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
You've lost your coping strategy. Which is fine... it was going to kill you after torturing you for years, right? So... you need more and better ones.

I completely believe in food addiction and the effect of carbs on the brain. It's easy and cheap but you "dig your grave with a spoon." And I used to binge. The key to recovery is to realize it has both an emotional, and a physical, component. You have to address both.

Emotional:
  • "I get bored" is an excuse. What did you eat in your old life? I bet it was round after round of the same five or so things. Bingers have their favorites. Foods and combinations that work in the short term. So "bored" is trying to con yourself. It is food. Not drugs. That is why you feel bored. You aren't getting a drug jolt from what you eat.
  • You are eating your feelings. You aren't going to get picked up by the police for driving while eating that sack of fast food, but you are using a drug all the same. Instead of actually grappling with certain things in your life, you are just falling face first into the cheap drug. Start addressing the reasons you want to binge, and revel in the thrill of getting these burdens off your psyche.
  • You have lost your "central purpose." Let's face it, eating this way simplifies a lot of things. Not clothes or self-esteem, but the whole structure of what do you do/how do we have fun/what is there to look forward to/how do I reward myself/how do I soothe myself/how do I compensate for feeling awful? You need new ways of handling all those things. Fun ways. Ways that work so much better.
  • Are you feeling "peer pressure"? Some people, whether they know it consciously or not, feel oppressed by the lack of available food, going out to restaurants, and the constant reminders that a sugar fix is minutes and dollars away and everyone else is enjoying it. If that is the case, you need to work on your priorities. For me, deciding that "I don't eat that anymore" removes the decision process. It is the decision that makes you feel bad and worried that you are missing something.

Physical:
  • You have been starved of nutrients. Carbs not only have few nutrients, they drain your body of your mineral and vitamin stores. Supplement to feel better. I use chromium picolinate to fight cravings and niacin to relieve my anxiety.
  • The sugar roller coaster keeps you unsatisfied. I love focusing on the fact that after my meal, I am actually satiated. I spent years hungry. Now, the freedom from the constant screaming hunger is more soothing than stuffing junk food ever was.
  • Outwit the "ease of use." Make once, eat many times. It's fun to put some songs on, make a big batch of something, and make your own frozen meals. Find a convenience store staple like hard-boiled eggs and dill pickles to have a little treat sometime. I love those Italian cold cuts rolled around mozzarella.
  • Expand your time frame. You cheat when you focus on that first bite. And stop. Push yourself to remember afterward; the overstuffed feeling, the nasty hunger that won't go away, the shame, the misery later.

I love Dr. Fung's book The Obesity Code, and he has a podcast of the same name. Lots of great ideas there about resetting your body.

It is more than just eating low carb. It's revamping your whole life. But isn't that what you want?

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  #13   ^
Old Fri, Jan-19-18, 18:16
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,149
 
Plan: Dr. Bernstein
Stats: 188/160/135 Female 5 ft 4 inches
BF:
Progress: 53%
Location: NE WA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
Please share, Bonnie!


Of course (she said modestly)!

I got this one somewhere on Pinterest - I think it's been around the block a few times!

Almond Flour Bread
makes 2 servings

1 1/2 tablespoons butter
1 egg
3 tablespoons almond flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder

Melt the butter in a microwave-safe bowl (a cereal bowl or small soufflé dish). When it is cool enough to not cook the egg, whisk in the egg. Add the almond flour and baking powder, whisking until it's well mixed. Smooth the top a bit and put in microwave for 90 seconds (my microwave is 900 watts). Turn it out on a cooling rack. When it's cool enough, I like to cut it in quarters, then slice each quarter horizontally. It keeps well in a plastic bag. NOTE: I haven't figured out why, but every time I make the bread it comes out a little different. I think it might be because I'm using home-grown eggs, so they range from small to jumbo. Might be something else. Looks different but tastes the same.

I got the original of the casserole from dietdoctor (Keto Tuna Casserole) but I wanted more vegetables in it so tweaked it a bit. I also made it for 2 servings instead of 4.

Tuna Vegetable Casserole
makes 2 servings

butter for cooking
1/2 yellow onion
8 oz. Asian style stir fry frozen vegetables*
1/4 green bell pepper (optional)
1 celery stalk
2 5 oz. cans tuna - drained
1/2 cup mayonnaise
3 oz. shredded cheese (any kind) separated
1/2 teaspoon chili flakes
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C). Chop onion, bell pepper, celery finely and cut larger pieces of frozen vegetables in half. Fry in butter in a large frying pan until slightly soft. Season with salt and pepper.

Mix tuna, mayonnaise, 2 ounces cheese and chili flakes in a greased
baking dish. Add fried vegetables and stir. Sprinkle remaining 1 ounce cheese over top.

Bake for 15-20 minutes or until golden.

*Any kind of vegetable would probably work well, even leftovers, but I'm fond of the Asian style.

I've no idea where I got the Egg Florentine recipe - if anyone recognizes it, please let me know. I've tweaked it a bit from the original, but the nutmeg was in the original.

Easy Egg Florentine
makes 2 servings

butter for cooking
8 oz. frozen chopped spinach
4 eggs
1 tablespoon grated cheese per egg – any variety
shake of nutmeg
Salt and pepper to taste

Thaw the spinach and drain well. Melt butter in skillet and add spinach. Cook until mostly done (doesn't take long). Stir in the nutmeg, salt, and pepper. When the spinach is hot, smooth it out and crack the eggs over the spinach. Cover. Continue heating until eggs are set and cooked to your liking; about 5 minutes. Near the end of the cooking time, sprinkle each egg with a tablespoon of shredded cheese.

*Original directions said to "thaw the spinach in skillet over medium-low heat; add a little water if it doesn't have any". Either way works. I'm very fond of any kind of vegetable sautéed in butter.

Bon appétit!
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  #14   ^
Old Fri, Jan-19-18, 20:13
robynsnest's Avatar
robynsnest robynsnest is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,144
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 336/286/199 Female 5'11"
BF:Losing it....
Progress: 36%
Location: Canada ay?
Default

Really great information and support here, thank you so much!
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  #15   ^
Old Fri, Jan-19-18, 23:53
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 5,632
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/238/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 10%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

DO you have the recipes to replace the old foods??? My kids eat pizza while I eat LC versions.

Depression is complicated and needs addressing to feel our best. The winter snows reflect a ton of light into my house and help boost my feeling of well being. ALso Vit D.

Dr Daniel Amen has many books to address depression and OTC solutions. Mine is to boost seratonin. NOw I can reach for a cookie of course but that is not LC and anything LC will not have the effect to boost my seratonin. Soooo if you can eat good carbs, perhaps slow the weight loss and include the carbs you need, Dr Amen suggests yams, and the like NOT cookie and cakes. SO perhaps go a bit slower to be able to include quality carbs. Increasing activity can allow for more carbs, if you are able to.

For me I use another option. 5-HTP. A seratonin precursor. OTC. Very helpful. Both my son and I use this. What time of day to take the tablet you will need to work out for you. Early am works best for me, another time might be better for you. 5 HTP is the same pathway as melatonin.

It is ok to go slower on Atkins. His goal is to make this a way of life. I understand. I have regained and added a few more, due to circumstances beyond my control. I can only work with in the new parameters to get where I want to go... and you can too!!

Depression can be crippling at worst, and debilitating in its mild form. I always manage my life to prevent depression, first and foremost. Maybe you too can find middle ground.

COngrats on your efforts thus far!!
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