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  #1   ^
Old Thu, Dec-07-17, 04:29
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Angry Give up carbs — are you out of your mind?

Words fail me!



Quote:
From The Times
London, UK
7 December, 2017

Give up carbs — are you out of your mind?

From posh carbonara to Christmas sarnies, comfort food is in demand again, says Tony Turnbull. Why did I ever stop eating it, asks Esther Walker


It’s not much of a pun — a letter “e” in the middle would have helped — but when the Eat sandwich chain started emblazoning its packaging with #CarbDiem earlier this year, you just knew that something was in the air. Then last month Instagram lit up with images of Raviolo, the rave new hangout in Manhattan, where the neon pink sign on the wall says it all: “Life is a combination of magic and pasta.” Yes, it’s official: carbohydrate is back on the menu.

Don’t believe me? Sandwich sales at Marks & Spencer are up by 35 per cent on the same period last year. At Bread Ahead, the artisan bread-maker in Borough Market, London, they have gone from giving bread-making classes to 24 people a week to 300 a week, with places booked up to a year in advance.

Meanwhile, from Al Dente Pasta Bar in Norwich to the Pasta Hut in Plymouth, every other new restaurant that has opened over the past month seems to have pasta at its core. At Passo, a new all-day Italian in Old Street in London, you can load up on orecchiette with octopus ragu, and pappardelle with wild boar and port sauce; at Flour & Grape pasta and wine bar in Bermondsey they have eight pasta dishes on the menu and precious little else. And have you seen the queues outside Pastaio, Stevie Parle’s new Italian diner in Soho? People are happy to wait up to three hours — yes, three hours — for a plate of handmade rigatoni in tomato sauce or Genoese-style pesto, which comes with pasta and potatoes.

You can even order your fix of pasta delivered through your letterbox, courtesy of Pasta Evangelists, which, with the backing of Prue Leith and our own Giles Coren, hopes to do for pumpkin ravioli and sage butter what Lovefilm did for video rental. Truly this is the age of the carb.

You can even order your fix of pasta delivered through your letterbox, courtesy of Pasta Evangelists, which, with the backing of Prue Leith and our own Giles Coren, hopes to do for pumpkin ravioli and sage butter what Lovefilm did for video rental. Truly this is the age of the carb.

Except that if they were honest it was never really about health, but about weight loss, and like all restrictive diets (ie every diet that ever existed) it only had a certain shelf life. Sooner or later the willpower cracks and you realise that a bowl of pasta carbonara is delicious and life-affirming in a way that a spiralised butternut squash never can be. So you slip back into your old ways until the next fad comes along.

We never gave up carbs in our house — what kind of middle-class hell would it be without pesto pasta come children’s teatime? — but we have introduced a rule of favouring less processed brown carbs over white so you get the benefit of the wholegrain. Out and about, though, all rules are off. Padella in Borough Market’s fettuccine with smoked eel, cream and lemon, or Pastaio’s bucatini cacio e pepe? You’d be a fool to deny yourself the pleasure of that.

I wish I hadn’t avoided pasta for 15 years

I left university two stone heavier than when I arrived. The link between refined carbohydrates and obesity had not yet been repopularised and I just ate white carbs and drank sugary cocktails and wondered why I was always hungry.

Then along came the Atkins diet. I looked at pictures of Jennifer Aniston — a fan of the diet — with her slim, toned arms and glowing skin, and from then on treated carbs like they were poison. I ran screaming in fright from chips and turned white at the mere mention of pasta. For 15 years I did this.

Don’t get me wrong, cutting out carbohydrate for weight loss works. And it suits anyone without the time or energy to think about “balance” or to prepare for themselves a rainbow plate with a palm-sized portion of this and a fist-sized portion of that.

It’s so binary. Protein: yes. Carbs: no. Stuck at a service station with only sandwiches for a snack? Buy a packet of ham and eat the whole thing. Brazils have the highest fat content of all nuts — eat three and you won’t want to eat again for a week.

Even the cast of The Only Way Is Essex could understand it. Preparing for their annual jaunt to Marbella they worked out in hoodies bearing the legend: “No Carbs Before Marbs.”

The message spread and in 2010, for the first time, sales of white bread — which have historically tracked population growth — fell by 1 per cent, while sales of brown bread increased by 6 per cent and seeded products by 9 per cent.

For years I denied myself anything approaching “comfort food” and never ate the kids’ leftover fries. Very occasionally I would eat a single thin slice of sourdough toast for breakfast. I sometimes missed spaghetti bolognese so much I would eat the sauce with spiralised courgette.

Then one day my husband, Giles, who also rarely eats carbs, came home and said: “There’s this new pasta delivery company, Pasta Evangelists, who want to know if I’m interested in working with them.”

“Pasta delivery?” I shrieked.

“I know!” he said. We fell about laughing for a bit at the idea that anyone would order pasta, but we tried it anyway.

“There’s not very much of it,” I said, peering into my small bowlful of fresh, handmade tagliatelli, dressed with a walnut pesto sauce and scattered with parmesan.

“Well,” Giles said, shrugging, “this is how much pasta an Italian would eat, not a stoned English student with the munchies. This won’t make you fat.”
Then I took the first mouthful of pasta I had eaten since 2005 and looked at my husband and said: “Oh my God. This is delicious.” I ate the whole lot at a nice, relaxed Italian pace. In the old days I would have piled the whole lot on to one forkful.

Once it was finished I felt a bit sad that there was no more, which is often the problem with pasta, but I thought about it and decided that, no, that was probably enough dinner. The next morning I didn’t weigh 400 stone. We had it again the next week, and the next. I did not put on weight.

That will sound absurd to anyone with a normal approach to food, but true carb-phobics will understand. Pasta had become to me the Devil’s doing. I believed that, once eaten, one strand would metabolise directly into neat sugar and turn me into the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man.

Alessandro Savelli, one of the founders of Pasta Evangelists, explains that the Italians who are slim eat carbohydrate — just not very much of it. “Italian women will probably eat pasta every day,” he says, “but in Italy pasta is usually eaten as a primo, it’s only a modest amount. And I would say that in the UK there is usually about 50 per cent too much sauce added. In Italy you would never, ever just have pasta for your dinner.”

Perhaps, I thought, the problem had never been with the carbs. Perhaps it had just been how much of them I had been eating — and with what.
Ayela Spiro, a nutrition science manager at the British Nutrition Foundation, sets me straight on a few things. “Weight gain typically results from eating more calories than your body uses,” she says. “Carbohydrate, like protein, contains around 4kcal per gram compared to fat, which contains 9kcal per gram. Provided starchy foods are not cooked or served with a lot of fat or sugars, and portion sizes are kept moderate, they are relatively low in calories.”

The problems come when you combine too much carbohydrate with fat and protein, she says. This, as we professional dieters will know, is the principle of the Hay diet, where you eat protein or carbohydrate, but never combine the two.

Another key point about carbohydrates is where you get them from. Processed carbohydrate, for example a bowl of Coco Pops, is catastrophic in the way that a handful of wholewheat pasta just isn’t. In his book How to Lose Weight Well, the TV medic Xand van Tulleken points out that some foods are designed to be addictive so that you go on eating beyond the point where you are full. “Studies show that ice cream affects the brain’s reward system in almost the same way as cocaine,” he says. “Most processed foods are almost impossible to stop eating.”

Jo Saunders thinks that making carbohydrate the bad guy is too simplistic. “There are so many other things going on in a diet other than just how much carbohydrate is taken on,” says the Bant-registered nutritionist at cookingthemhealthy.com, which specialises in women’s health.

“There’s what sort you are eating and at what time,” she explains. “I’d always advise ‘clever’ carbohydrate such as parsnip, squash and other root veg, and also to front-load your eating, ie eating a lot early in the day and tailing off towards bedtime.

“For example, if you find at around kids’ teatime you can’t stay off the children’s food, just eat with them and make that your evening meal. That would give you a long fast until breakfast the next day and there are some important biochemical processes that can’t happen unless you’re in a fasting state.

“I also think the whole debate about carbohydrate has moved on and it’s gut bacteria we need to focus on. If you’re just cutting out carbs you will mess around with your gut health and that in turn will upset your digestion and hormones.”

And that in turn, says Georgia Lennard, a naturopathic nutritionist from beyondbalance.co.uk, will have the opposite effect from the one you intended. “A very low-carb diet is do-able for about two to three years, depending on the type of person you are, but it’s not sustainable in terms of losing or maintaining weight. Without some good carbohydrate you won’t digest effectively.” In other words, the eat-all-you-want protein diet will work for so long, then it will start to work against you.

I certainly found that up until about the age of 30 (I am now 37), as long as my diet was high-fat, high-meat and low-sugar I was doing OK. Then, past 35, I realised that I could no longer chow down on endless stews and roasts and bacon and eggs and still be within my ideal weight range.

Age definitely has got a lot to do with it, Saunders says. “For women, as they enter the pre- or peri-menopausal stage of life, their metabolism goes down and thyroid function is affected — a certain level of good carbohydrate is required to make the thyroid hormone.”

Let’s not get carried away: processed food and sugar are still the No 1 enemy. Yes to wholewheat pasta and jacket potatoes; no to an entire pizza.
“Processed sugar sends blood sugar and insulin through the roof,” says Lennard. “It screams to your body to store fat and pushes fat into the cells at a rapid rate. Nobody can get away with it and there is no excuse for eating that stuff.”

But above all else, not getting fat is about not eating too much, whether it is steak and eggs or a huge pile of spaghetti. Once you realise that, you may as well be having a small bowlful of delicious pasta as anything else. And amen to that.
Esther Walker



https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/...-mind-qp69sqjh0

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  #2   ^
Old Thu, Dec-07-17, 04:52
Kristine's Avatar
Kristine Kristine is online now
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Plan: Primal
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OMG.

Quote:
Give up carbs — are you out of your mind?

If you scrolled down without reading it, it's the same old tired "Everything in moderation" nonsense. There, saved you 2 minutes of your life you'll never get back.

Quote:
But above all else, not getting fat is about not eating too much, whether it is steak and eggs or a huge pile of spaghetti. Once you realise that, you may as well be having a small bowlful of delicious pasta as anything else. And amen to that.
Well, thank you for that! People with weight/eating problems all over the planet have wasted billions of dollars over the years trying to figure this out, and all we have to do is make sure we only eat a little bit of the foods that make us want to tear the fridge door off its hinges to eat more.

Okay then!
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  #3   ^
Old Thu, Dec-07-17, 05:16
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
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Plan: ketosis/IF
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The mention of how Italians vs. English eat pasta sent me to the wikipedia page on obesity in Italy, which is scant but hilarious.

Quote:
Obesity rates in Italian two-year-olds are the highest in Europe with a rate of 42%.[2] Causes are lack of a Mediterranean diet and lifestyle choices such as exercise and getting enough sleep


Not that childhood obesity is funny. Accusing 2 year olds of having a lifestyle, though...


Quote:
Scientists from the University of Verona designed a new type of park to help deal with obesity in Italian children.[4] The main differences is there's an adult trainer in charge, the children are following a series of organised exercises and all the children are under 6 years old.[4] The cost of the playground was $250,000


Okay, this one isn't so much hilarious as an abomination. Get the kids in bootcamp as early as possible.

Back to our originally scheduled outrage. If you think spiralized butternut squash is less tasty than white paste extruded into tubes, you may have a problem. Notice she gives the real pasta the benefit of the sauce in the description. It needs it.

Quote:
I certainly found that up until about the age of 30 (I am now 37), as long as my diet was high-fat, high-meat and low-sugar I was doing OK. Then, past 35, I realised that I could no longer chow down on endless stews and roasts and bacon and eggs and still be within my ideal weight range.


This is more obvious in women--but not absent in men, testosterone is a real advantage for dieters, and 40+ers generally have less than guys in their 20s. If reduced food intake does become necessary--that makes food quality more important, reducing the non-essential bits, carbohydrate fits nicely there, makes sense, and even if you can't eat all you want of roasts and bacon and eggs etc., it's generally easier to eat smaller portions of these than of pasta, bread etc.
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  #4   ^
Old Thu, Dec-07-17, 05:52
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cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Plan: very low carb real food
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I'm so tired of this combination of arrogance, ignorance and stupidity. I didn't make it through the article. I started to fume so I stopped reading. What makes her an expert? Answer, "nothing".

Jean
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  #5   ^
Old Thu, Dec-07-17, 07:00
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
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Posts: 11,452
 
Plan: ketosis/IF
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Quote:
And that in turn, says Georgia Lennard, a naturopathic nutritionist from beyondbalance.co.uk, will have the opposite effect from the one you intended. “A very low-carb diet is do-able for about two to three years,


This after the author herself found the diet doable for 15 years...

Quote:
The problems come when you combine too much carbohydrate with fat and protein, she says. This, as we professional dieters will know, is the principle of the Hay diet, where you eat protein or carbohydrate, but never combine the two.


No. Not combining fat and carbs probably makes more sense. Equating protein with fat just because they often come together is silly.

I have no problem with the idea that low carb isn't the only game in town. Claiming it's not a viable option is ignorant, impractical and incompetent.
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  #6   ^
Old Thu, Dec-07-17, 07:47
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
To Good Health!
Posts: 9,552
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
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I had a good laugh over this article this morning too...but then later, was treated to even more great advice from the British Dietetic Association.

These 5 celebrity food regimes were just ripped to shreds by a top authority on diets

You have to know the Ketogenic Diet would be on the list, but they saved their most withering criticism for Dr Aseem Malhotra and the Pioppi Diet.
Maybe he should be pleased to have been elevated from a renown Cardiologist to a "Celebrity"

http://www.businessinsider.com/5-ce...ciation-2017-12


Quote:
Pioppi diet

Celeb Link: Keith Vaz MP, chair of the All Party Parliamentary Diabetes group, urged 100 MPs with the highest prevalence of type 2 diabetes in their constituencies to follow the plan over the 2017 parliamentary summer recess. Andy Burnham Former secretary of state for health and Mayor of Manchester has described the book as having “the power to make millions of people healthier and happier, and help sustain our NHS”.

What is it? Authors Dr Aseem Malhotra and Donal O’Neill take the small Italian village of Pioppi – recognised by UNESCO as the home of the Mediterranean Diet – as the name of their new spin on a low carb, high fat diet. The diet recommends a higher fat diet than the traditional Mediterranean one - adherents are encouraged to eat lots of vegetables, nuts, legumes, and fish and discouraged from eating red meat, starchy carbs, and sweetened treats. Our

Verdict: The book pays homage to eating plenty of fruit and vegetables, fish, olive oil, alcohol in moderation and not being sedentary (much like the current UK government guidelines). But the authors may well be the only people in the history of the planet who have been to Italy and come back with a diet named after an Italian village that excludes pasta, rice and bread – but includes coconuts – perhaps because they have a low carb agenda. The suggestion that this Italian village should be associated with recipes for cauliflower base pizza and rice substitute made from grated cauliflower or anything made using coconut oil is ridiculous. It also uses potentially dangerous expressions like "clean meat" and encourages people to starve themselves for 24 hours at a time every week. Following a more typical Mediterranean diet, would also be kinder on the wallet, as the dietary approach in Pioppi is unlikely to be cheap

Bottom line: Pioppi-ably not a good idea! The traditional Mediterranean diet is a healthy choice but this had been hijacked here. Fasting may help weight loss but the only reason their other advice is likely to help people lose weight is because it involves eating less food and calories.

Ketogenic diet

Celeb Link: A plethora of celebs have been linked with this diet including: Kim Kardashian, Kobe Bryant, LeBron James, Halle Berry, Gwyneth Paltrow, Mick Jagger, Rihanna, Alec Baldwin, Matthew McConaughey, Tom Jones.

What is it? This diet, is out there in many versions rather like Atkins or Paleo but the premise is the same: very low carb (around 20-50g per day or 5% total calories), relatively high in fat, moderate protein. Typically it excludes grains, dairy, legumes, soy, most fruits and starchy vegetables. The carbohydrates in the diet come mainly from non-starchy vegetables, nuts and seeds. If you significantly decrease the amount of carbohydrate in your diet, the body switches from primarily burning carbohydrates, to burning fat, for energy. This causes an increase in levels of ketones in our bodies. Supporters claim it can help you to lose weight, control hunger and improve your health. Worryingly some say it can treat or prevent a number of different types of cancer which is just not true.

BDA Verdict: A carefully dietitian-planned ketogenic diet can be a very effective treatment for people with epilepsy. For weight loss, there’s no magic, the diet works like any other by cutting total calories and removing foods people tend to overeat. Initial side effects may include low energy levels, brain fog, increased hunger, sleep problems, nausea, digestive discomfort, bad breath and poor exercise performance. It can be an effective method of weight loss in the short term with careful planning but it is hard to sustain for many in the long term and most of the initial weight loss seen is often associated with water/fluid losses. It is never a good idea to ‘over-restrict’ any one food group (including carbohydrate), as this can mean it is more difficult to achieve a balanced diet overall with respect to vitamins, minerals and fibre in particular. If consuming high fat then the type of fat needs to be considered.

Bottom line: May suit some but ketone-ly with careful planning for balance, heart and gut health.


All here: https://www.bda.uk.com/news/view?id...B0%5D=news/list

Last edited by JEY100 : Thu, Dec-07-17 at 08:07.
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  #7   ^
Old Thu, Dec-07-17, 08:45
M Levac M Levac is offline
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Plan: VLC, mostly meat
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Quote:
Yes, it’s official: carbohydrate is back on the menu.

It's never been off.
Quote:
At Bread Ahead, the artisan bread-maker in Borough Market, London, they have gone from giving bread-making classes to 24 people a week to 300 a week, with places booked up to a year in advance.

So people can learn to make the same crappy bread they can get cheap at the shop? BS, maybe they just wanna make better bread, so they learn to make it themselves.
Quote:
Meanwhile, from Al Dente Pasta Bar in Norwich to the Pasta Hut in Plymouth, every other new restaurant that has opened over the past month seems to have pasta at its core. At Passo, a new all-day Italian in Old Street in London, you can load up on orecchiette with octopus ragu, and pappardelle with wild boar and port sauce; at Flour & Grape pasta and wine bar in Bermondsey they have eight pasta dishes on the menu and precious little else. And have you seen the queues outside Pastaio, Stevie Parle’s new Italian diner in Soho? People are happy to wait up to three hours — yes, three hours — for a plate of handmade rigatoni in tomato sauce or Genoese-style pesto, which comes with pasta and potatoes.

It's been like this, and growing, ever since we figured out how to grow boatloads of wheat (and other grains). Nothing new here.
Quote:
I wish I hadn’t avoided pasta for 15 years

I wish I'd avoided wheat for the past 40 years. Pfft.
Quote:
Then along came the Atkins diet.
...
It’s so binary. Protein: yes. Carbs: no.

Idjit.
Quote:
The message spread and in 2010, for the first time, sales of white bread — which have historically tracked population growth — fell by 1 per cent, while sales of brown bread increased by 6 per cent and seeded products by 9 per cent.

So, you bought shares, now you're pissed and wanna change things around with some feel-good BS? Boo hoo.
Quote:
For years I denied myself anything approaching “comfort food” and never ate the kids’ leftover fries.

Cuz you eat as well as possible, but don't care what your kids eat? Idjit.
Quote:
“Well,” Giles said, shrugging, “this is how much pasta an Italian would eat, not a stoned English student with the munchies. This won’t make you fat.”

Yes, it will, only less so. Idjit.
Quote:
Once it was finished I felt a bit sad that there was no more, which is often the problem with pasta, but I thought about it and decided that, no, that was probably enough dinner. The next morning I didn’t weigh 400 stone. We had it again the next week, and the next. I did not put on weight.

Liar. Except for the sad part. I truly deeply genuinely believe you when you say you were sad there wasn't any more.
Quote:
Alessandro Savelli, one of the founders of Pasta Evangelists, explains that the Italians who are slim eat carbohydrate — just not very much of it. “Italian women will probably eat pasta every day,” he says, “but in Italy pasta is usually eaten as a primo, it’s only a modest amount. And I would say that in the UK there is usually about 50 per cent too much sauce added. In Italy you would never, ever just have pasta for your dinner.”

Italians must be smart, maybe smarter than you.
Quote:
Perhaps, I thought, the problem had never been with the carbs. Perhaps it had just been how much of them I had been eating — and with what.

Da hell, brain fart?
Quote:
Ayela Spiro, a nutrition science manager at the British Nutrition Foundation, sets me straight on a few things. “Weight gain typically results from eating more calories than your body uses,”

...wisdom doesn't last very long...
Quote:
“Most processed foods are almost impossible to stop eating.”

Pasta. The single most processed food on the planet. You can stop eating it whenever you want, it's not one of those.
Quote:
Jo Saunders thinks that making carbohydrate the bad guy is too simplistic. “There are so many other things going on in a diet other than just how much carbohydrate is taken on,” says the Bant-registered nutritionist at cookingthemhealthy.com, which specialises in women’s health.

One name to put in your little black book, with a note "avoid".
Quote:
“For example, if you find at around kids’ teatime you can’t stay off the children’s food, just eat with them and make that your evening meal. That would give you a long fast until breakfast the next day and there are some important biochemical processes that can’t happen unless you’re in a fasting state.

See what I mean? Avoid avoid avoid.
Quote:
“I also think the whole debate about carbohydrate has moved on and it’s gut bacteria we need to focus on. If you’re just cutting out carbs you will mess around with your gut health and that in turn will upset your digestion and hormones.”

Hormones like insulin? That thing that goes bonkers when you eat pasta? Yeah, we've messed enough with insulin, thank you.
Quote:
And that in turn, says Georgia Lennard, a naturopathic nutritionist from beyondbalance.co.uk, will have the opposite effect from the one you intended. “A very low-carb diet is do-able for about two to three years, depending on the type of person you are, but it’s not sustainable in terms of losing or maintaining weight. Without some good carbohydrate you won’t digest effectively.” In other words, the eat-all-you-want protein diet will work for so long, then it will start to work against you.

Good carbs like the single most processed food on the planet - pasta? How is it even possible for a thing to be good for a while, then turn bad? What's the mechanism? Does it have a mind of its own, decides out of the blue to mess aroud with things after it's been only helpful for years? GTFO, idjit.
Quote:
I certainly found that up until about the age of 30 (I am now 37), as long as my diet was high-fat, high-meat and low-sugar I was doing OK. Then, past 35, I realised that I could no longer chow down on endless stews and roasts and bacon and eggs and still be within my ideal weight range.

Age definitely has got a lot to do with it, Saunders says. “For women, as they enter the pre- or peri-menopausal stage of life, their metabolism goes down and thyroid function is affected — a certain level of good carbohydrate is required to make the thyroid hormone.”

Unrelated to diet. About carbs being required to make the thyroid hormone - BS. Iodine.
Quote:
Let’s not get carried away

You mean with the idiocy, the stupidity, the fallacy and the lies? Yep, totally agree, let's not get carried away with that.
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  #8   ^
Old Fri, Dec-08-17, 06:05
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
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I'm actually surprised she was able to gag down the pasta, after 15 years LC. I know that personally, after not quite that long LC, I can't stand the tasteless taste of pasta or bread - might as well eat cardboard or styrofoam, for all the flavor it has.

Oh but it seems she wasn't truly LC all that time:
Quote:
For years I denied myself anything approaching “comfort food” and never ate the kids’ leftover fries. Very occasionally I would eat a single thin slice of sourdough toast for breakfast. I sometimes missed spaghetti bolognese so much I would eat the sauce with spiralised courgette.


Considering that most sourdough breads are bigger than most regular breads (much broader loaves), that single thin slice of sourdough bread was probably enough to put her out of ketosis repeatedly during those 15 years. No wonder she was craving spaghetti. I'm not sure what the problem is with spiralized courgette (zucchini) - a lot of us have been doing that for years. If she wanted, she could have had bolognaise sauce over "squashta" every day of those 15 years - who needs pasta?

Quote:
Once it was finished I felt a bit sad that there was no more, which is often the problem with pasta, but I thought about it and decided that, no, that was probably enough dinner. The next morning I didn’t weigh 400 stone. We had it again the next week, and the next. I did not put on weight.

That will sound absurd to anyone with a normal approach to food, but true carb-phobics will understand. Pasta had become to me the Devil’s doing. I believed that, once eaten, one strand would metabolise directly into neat sugar and turn me into the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man.


Honestly, I think she's more than a bit obsessive - acting like a single very small meal of pasta would suddenly make her gain to 400 stone (5,600 lbs), and that a single strand of pasta would turn her into the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man.

She's right in that for her, it was never about health, or keeping her blood sugar on an even keel, with that kind of grossly over exaggerated concept of how carb consumption affects the body. For her, it was always purely about weight.

But notice that they also didn't eat these small servings of pasta daily - they had them once a week. If their weekly pasta indulgence didn't cause her to crave more and more carbs on a daily basis, then she's not someone who could never control her carb consumption to begin with.

Give her some time though - my guess is that the weekly pasta mini-meal will eventually give way to eating the kids' leftover fries, sandwiches on thick slices of bread, 3 different kinds of potatoes at a meal (I've been to England - yes, they often serve potatoes prepared 3 different ways at a single meal!), and pizza.
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  #9   ^
Old Fri, Dec-08-17, 06:33
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
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Plan: ketosis/IF
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Quote:
For years I denied myself anything approaching “comfort food”

Quote:
Once it was finished I felt a bit sad that there was no more, which is often the problem with pasta,


If you go to somebody for comfort, and they make you feel sad instead of better, you might want to rethink the relationship. What's the point? Sometimes people say to me, why don't you have just a couple potato chips, a tiny slice of pie, toast one marshmallow? What's the point? I don't want a couple potato chips, when I do want them, I want a pound.
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  #10   ^
Old Sat, Dec-09-17, 07:55
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
If you go to somebody for comfort, and they make you feel sad instead of better, you might want to rethink the relationship. What's the point? Sometimes people say to me, why don't you have just a couple potato chips, a tiny slice of pie, toast one marshmallow? What's the point? I don't want a couple potato chips, when I do want them, I want a pound.


A single chocolate chip cookie is just a tease. All the cookies in the cookie jar are never enough.

This thread seems to be melding with the thread about carb addiction.

One cookie/donut/potato chip is too many, and the entire bag/box full is never enough - if that isn't a sign of an addiction, I don't know what is.

Only another heroin addict (or a drug pusher) would try to convince a clean and sober heroin addict that it won't hurt to have just tiny hit of heroin.
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Old Sat, Dec-09-17, 08:25
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WereBear WereBear is online now
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
I'm actually surprised she was able to gag down the pasta, after 15 years LC. I know that personally, after not quite that long LC, I can't stand the tasteless taste of pasta or bread - might as well eat cardboard or styrofoam, for all the flavor it has.


I completely agree. I was at a family get-together this summer, and I got a bag of white cheddar popcorn, which I just love, as a snacky thing since I wanted a drink and won't do it on an empty stomach, and it had been years since so indulging.

And it tasted like someone had sprinkled white cheddar on those styrofoam packing peanuts! No cravings for it And I can have all the white cheddar I wish in my morning eggs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
Give her some time though - my guess is that the weekly pasta mini-meal will eventually give way to eating the kids' leftover fries, sandwiches on thick slices of bread, 3 different kinds of potatoes at a meal (I've been to England - yes, they often serve potatoes prepared 3 different ways at a single meal!), and pizza.


Look at the many many people on this very forum who talk about carbing up, controlled cheats, just-this-once and on and on. Some of them come crawling back... and some of them never come back.

I know myself how easy that slide can be. I also love a "posh carbonara" which is great over raw spinach or cooked broccoli
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Old Sat, Dec-09-17, 08:33
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cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Plan: very low carb real food
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Quote:
At Passo, a new all-day Italian in Old Street in London, you can load up on orecchiette with octopus ragu, and pappardelle with wild boar and port sauce; at Flour & Grape pasta and wine bar in Bermondsey they have eight pasta dishes on the menu and precious little else. And have you seen the queues outside Pastaio, Stevie Parle’s new Italian diner in Soho? People are happy to wait up to three hours — yes, three hours — for a plate of handmade rigatoni in tomato sauce or Genoese-style pesto, which comes with pasta and potatoes.


This quote from the article alone gives me a clue as to what her life style and values are, at least around food. I don't find any of that appealing. I like that food is not a major source of entertainment for me. Sure I like it to taste good but as long as it is minimally palatable it's ok with me. I don't need food to be a peak experience for me. I'm just trying to nourish my body.

Jean
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Old Sat, Dec-09-17, 08:46
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is online now
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cotonpal
This quote from the article alone gives me a clue as to what her life style and values are, at least around food. I don't find any of that appealing. I like that food is not a major source of entertainment for me. Sure I like it to taste good but as long as it is minimally palatable it's ok with me. I don't need food to be a peak experience for me. I'm just trying to nourish my body.

Jean


The funny thing is, for me, the low carb food is vastly more palatable.

When I am hungry and tuck into a nice rib-eye with blue cheese dressing and buttered broccoli I am thrilled. This is so tasty! Much more so than the food I ate before. I realized the "tastiness" I was craving was in the sauce, not the grain product I put it on. Putting the sauce on vegetables or eggs is more satisfying, not less.

This lady getting thrilled about pasta? That's the dopamine hitting her brain... not the exquisiteness of what is, after all, wallpaper paste.
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Old Sat, Dec-09-17, 12:33
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Plan: Dr. Bernstein
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
If you go to somebody for comfort, and they make you feel sad instead of better, you might want to rethink the relationship. What's the point? Sometimes people say to me, why don't you have just a couple potato chips, a tiny slice of pie, toast one marshmallow? What's the point? I don't want a couple potato chips, when I do want them, I want a pound.


Potato chips, bread of any kind, pasta, rice - those are all things I don't dare take a bite of because I know it won't end with one bite.

I still overeat - I know I have food-related problems that I'm working on - but I don't overeat on starchy carbs as I don't eat even one bite. I can still make a pig of myself with meat, cheese, and/or nuts. Too much protein drives up my bg, but not as much as a loaf of bread or a family-size bag of potato chips would.
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Old Sun, Dec-10-17, 22:55
M Levac M Levac is offline
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Plan: VLC, mostly meat
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Counterpoint to her pasta and taters.

Saturday, we had a nice dinner for four at my mom's. Steak, salad, mushrooms and wine. Simple and boring? You bet, but oh so wonderfully tasty. Steak and mushrooms cooked in (lots for the shrooms, my very own simplest of recipes, just brilliant if I say so myself)) butter in the pan. A bit of cumin (don't know the English name, is it curcuma or something like that?) and salt for the mushrooms, just salt for the steak. Salad with lots of avocados, I think Boston lettuce, a somewhat mild but tangy vinaigrette, and bits of some kind of sausage. The steaks of course, seared rare. The wine was some Pinot Noir, I think, nothing too fancy, just right. Sounds good so far? Yeah, then for desert, mom decided to get the gingerbread man cookies out. Couldn't really resist, it was just there if you know what I mean. One of us was a kid and mom being mom, really likes to do that kind of thing. Oh yeah, forgot, I was too hungry to wait, so I scarfed down a pack of cracker barrel before we started cooking, maybe 200g or something, hadn't eaten all day you see. And a glass of milk with the cookies, like anything else was gonna happen with that, doh.

So, you wanna eat LC (minus the cookies, of course)? You want taste? You want a joyful meal? This is it. I promise.
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