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  #1   ^
Old Tue, Nov-07-17, 13:17
locarb4avr locarb4avr is offline
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Plan: My own plan
Stats: 220/141/132 Male 65in
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Default The Metabolic Effects of Low-carbohydrate Diets and Incorporation into a Biochemistry

Was trying to refresh my memory on Biochemistry and found this.

The Metabolic Effects of Low-carbohydrate Diets and
Incorporation into a Biochemistry Course
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...94033022445/pdf

Is old but is not a bad read.

Quote on
Certainly the kidneys work
harder and excrete more nitrogen when protein is elevated
in the diet; however, the only changes researchers have
observed associated with low-carbohydrate diets have
been limited to increased glomerular filtration (considered
benign) and lower calcium levels
Quote off

This is why I said when you eat chicken bone-in or other meats bone-in, slow cook them and eat joints and bones if possible.

FYI, healthy recipes I love;
Baking soda(Sodium bicarbonate) + psyllium hydrophilic mucilloid => Sodium + Carbonate + fiber

Slow cook greasy meat bone-in tomato soup => calcium, joints, protein + fat + some carb + NaCl(some) + potassium + oiled lycopene

Supermarket 8 piece fried chicken => calcium, joints, protein + fat + some carb + NaCl(some)

Do not over rely on over counter calcium tablets.
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  #2   ^
Old Tue, Nov-07-17, 18:16
LC FP LC FP is offline
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Posts: 1,143
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 228/195/188 Male 72 inches
BF:
Progress: 83%
Location: Erie PA
Default

If people run a lower calcium on a ketogenic diet, maybe the real normal calcium level is lower.
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  #3   ^
Old Wed, Nov-08-17, 12:08
M Levac M Levac is offline
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Posts: 6,238
 
Plan: VLC, mostly meat
Stats: 202/200/165 Male 5' 7"
BF:
Progress: 5%
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Default

Blood content doesn't tell us tissue content. We use blood content as markers for tissue content, but often it's misleading because we do straight correlation, i.e. if there's more in the blood there must be more in tissues. There's more possible reasons for blood content.

A priori, it's all about a balance between growth and recycling. There's continuous growth, and continuous inhibition of growth. If anything interferes with growth or inhibition, balance will shift, it will show up in the blood. In this sense, a higher calcium count indicates there's not enough growth or too much inhibition. Tissues can't keep what they got, it gets dumped in the blood - higher calcium count.

Then, it's a demand system - the blood is the supply pipeline for everything. The greater the demand, the more there's gonna be in the blood. We can see this with ketones, glucose, various hormones like GH and testosterone for example, and a bunch other things. In this sense, higher calcium indicates greater demand.

Considering the many beneficial effects of low-carb, it seems unlikely to me that a lower calcium count is anything to worry about. If anything, it shows that things are returning to normal - growth/inhibition balance, proper demand response.
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  #4   ^
Old Wed, Nov-08-17, 13:13
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
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Progress: 89%
Location: Ontario
Default

Quote:
These observations
were made in epileptic children who had been on an
extreme form of the diet for up to 2 years


The reference for this is to a review in 1998 that looked at studies back as far as 1966. Earlier versions of the ketogenic diet for kids with epilepsy often relied heavily on ketocal, early versions of which were made with hydrogenated soy oil. They also included water restriction, in an attempt to increase ketone concentrations through dehydration. Also people didn't know about possible concerns with things like carnitine and choline that can be a problem if they're too low on a very high fat ratio ketogenic diet. "Ketogenic" is a single dietary quality, it's not the only one that matters, and likely not the one that causes issues with things like calcium, when they occur.
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  #5   ^
Old Wed, Nov-08-17, 13:19
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Posts: 11,378
 
Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
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Default

There's a reason for Phinney and Volek constantly repeating the phrase "a well-formulated ketogenic diet."
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  #6   ^
Old Thu, Nov-09-17, 13:23
locarb4avr locarb4avr is offline
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Posts: 206
 
Plan: My own plan
Stats: 220/141/132 Male 65in
BF:
Progress: 90%
Location: 92646
Default

I mentioned calcium and bone health here, because my doctor always advised me and even prescribed me calcium supplement after blood test in annual checkup. I did not put much effort in this area.

I did notice that animals(ie dogs) love eating bones and joints. Unless they are really stupid, there must have reasons for them doing that.

Below is another old paper regarding over the counter supplements.

Questions and Answers: NIH Glucosamine/Chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial Primary Study
https://nccih.nih.gov/research/results/gait/qa.htm

The reason I mentioned joints here, because they are Carb. I believe we must eat joints in low carb diets, but I have no scientific proof. Joint problems is not life threatening diseases, but they did spent $12.5 million in GAIT study. Hopefully we will know more of this.
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  #7   ^
Old Thu, Nov-09-17, 16:38
M Levac M Levac is offline
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Posts: 6,238
 
Plan: VLC, mostly meat
Stats: 202/200/165 Male 5' 7"
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Progress: 5%
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Default

Calcium and arthritis together don't make sense to me. Arthritis is all about the joints, calcium is all about the bones.

I believe arthritis is caused by inflammation, therefore there's an injury of some kind. It's either physical, chemical or pathogenic. Physical would be some excess weight, a severe impact or lack of lubrication. Chemical would be something like gout. Pathogenic would be some bacteria, virus, fungus, parasite.

From what I know of low-carb, it reduces inflammation. Since inflammation is an immune response to some injury of some kind, it's reasonable to assume that low-carb allows that injury to heal.
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  #8   ^
Old Fri, Nov-10-17, 17:35
locarb4avr locarb4avr is offline
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Posts: 206
 
Plan: My own plan
Stats: 220/141/132 Male 65in
BF:
Progress: 90%
Location: 92646
Default

Vitamin D supplement doses and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the range associated with cancer prevention.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21378345

Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Studies indicate that intake of vitamin D in the range from 1,100 to 4,000 IU/d and a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration [25(OH)D] from 60-80 ng/ml may be needed to reduce cancer risk. Few community-based studies allow estimation of the dose-response relationship between oral intake of vitamin D and corresponding serum 25(OH)D in the range above 1,000 IU/d.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
A descriptive study of serum 25(OH)D concentration and self-reported vitamin D intake in a community-based cohort (n = 3,667, mean age 51.3 13.4 y).
RESULTS:
Serum 25(OH)D rose as a function of self-reported vitamin D supplement ingestion in a curvilinear fashion, with no intakes of 10,000 IU/d or lower producing 25(OH)D values above the lower-bound of the zone of potential toxicity (200 ng/ml). Unsupplemented all-source input was estimated at 3,300 IU/d. The supplemental dose ensuring that 97.5% of this population achieved a serum 25(OH)D of at least 40 ng/ml was 9,600 IU/d.
CONCLUSION:
Universal intake of up to 40,000 IU vitamin D per day is unlikely to result in vitamin D toxicity.
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  #9   ^
Old Sat, Nov-11-17, 09:51
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Default

I used to wake up at 2 AM with my hands screaming.

I was already eating low carb, but when I removed the tiny amounts of gluten I was getting from low carb wraps and the like... it went back to some complaints from my thumbs.

I think inflammatory is the key.
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