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  #1   ^
Old Mon, Oct-30-17, 22:06
RawNut's Avatar
RawNut RawNut is offline
Lipivore
Posts: 1,173
 
Plan: Very Low Carb Paleo
Stats: 270/185/180 Male 72 inches
BF:
Progress: 94%
Location: Florida
Default Ancestral Health Symposium 2017 is online.

Very interesting with the seemingly contradictory subjects and all.

https://www.youtube.com/user/Ancest...t=dd&shelf_id=1

Last edited by RawNut : Mon, Oct-30-17 at 22:11.
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  #2   ^
Old Tue, Oct-31-17, 05:00
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
To Good Health!
Posts: 9,491
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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Thank You for posting these!! Quite a few I want to see.
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  #3   ^
Old Tue, Oct-31-17, 09:44
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 11,367
 
Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 89%
Location: Ontario
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Kyle Mamounis's talk vs. sugar causing insulin resistance is interesting. I think it's wrong-headed, but interesting.

He starts with the debate resolution, "Sugar causes insulin resistance," which to me is a non-starter. If I say, "Sugar is the cause of insulin resistance," you only have to show conditions under which sugar doesn't cause insulin resistance, to show that sugar isn't the cause.

Not that I know much about philosophy or engineering, but a useful bit of philosophy here might be to not use philosophy to solve an engineering problem. I don't care whether sugar is the "ultimate" cause, I care about whether I'll benefit by avoiding it.
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  #4   ^
Old Tue, Oct-31-17, 11:42
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is online now
Posts: 1,898
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Thanks for the link, RN. I just watched "Ketogenic Diets, Caloric Restriction, and Hormones" by L. Amber O'Hearn. This is a treasure trove of findings and for anyone following or thinking of adopting a ketogenic diet, it's a must watch. Many thought-provoking ideas and hypotheses, and in general, the information enables those of us in ketosis to better understand the health benefits and to better understand any negative claims due to certain things like cortisol levels that are higher for people who are in ketosis. These levels can also be viewed as a positive side effect and a unique manifestation of the diet itself.

Looks like I'll be spending a lot of time with additional presentations.
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  #5   ^
Old Wed, Nov-01-17, 11:31
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JLx JLx is offline
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Posts: 1,808
 
Plan: IF
Stats: 210/191/165 Female 66
BF:High wt, 276, 255
Progress: 42%
Location: Michigan U.P., USA
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Quote:
...to better understand any negative claims due to certain things like cortisol levels that are higher for people who are in ketosis. These levels can also be viewed as a positive side effect and a unique manifestation of the diet itself.


Insomnia, involuntary jaw clenching and anxiety chest pain are some of my experiences. They don't feel like positives.
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  #6   ^
Old Sun, Nov-05-17, 06:53
JLx's Avatar
JLx JLx is offline
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Posts: 1,808
 
Plan: IF
Stats: 210/191/165 Female 66
BF:High wt, 276, 255
Progress: 42%
Location: Michigan U.P., USA
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Watched AHS17 Where do cravings come from? - Stephan Guyenet yesterday.

Quote:
Most cravings are simply dopamine-reinforced motivations. (On a below consciousness level.) When you're hungry, when you're brain perceives it's in an energy depleted state, it's not that interested in low-calorie foods. The amount of dopamine released is proportional to the number of nutrients in the gut.

Concentrated sugar, starch, fat, protein, salt, and glutamate create and maintain cravings. (Modern foods are too refined, too calorie dense and too hyper-palatable.)

The most commonly craved foods are fatty/savory (chips) and fatty/sweet (chocolate).


His tips to deal with cravings:

Quote:
Limit your cue exposure, such as sight and smell

Focus on simple unrefined foods, such as "fruits, meats, vegetables, oatmeal, yogurt, potatoes and sweet potatoes, which don't have the real high concentration of those nutrients that spike your dopamine and less likely to drive your motivation to an excessive level."

Let yourself forget - "the nonconscious parts of the brain forget and so those reward associations that you've formed, if you don't continue to reinforce those by continuing to eat those foods, they will gradually fade over time and have less and less power over you."


Some of his examples of "simple unrefined foods" are going to be a problem for some people, was my first thought. Or are they? In their unrefined simple state without accompanying fat? I'm guessing that anyone who has tried The Potato Hack finds potatoes by themselves don't elicit cravings for more and more (except in terms of actual hunger).

Also, he's addressing one specific part of the brain - forgot the name, but he had images of his own functional MRI lighting up while in a hungry state to pictures of brownies versus broccoli - but what about what else is going on in the brain (serotonin, norepinephrine) and the rest of the body (insulin, ghrelin, leptin)?

I know Stephan Guyenet, because he's tangled so much with Gary Taubes, may not be of interest to many here, but I found this an interesting talk.
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  #7   ^
Old Sun, Nov-05-17, 09:33
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
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Posts: 11,367
 
Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 89%
Location: Ontario
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My problem with palatability is mostly that it's treated by Guyunet as an alternative hypothesis, and the insulin hypothesis gets swept aside. I hypothesize that a structure got blown over because it wasn't sturdy/well anchored enough, you suggest that the wind was too strong. Neither of our arguments make sense, the structure wasn't sturdy/well anchored enough to resist the strength of the wind.

Also--eat 1000 calories as butter, hard to finish. 1000 calories of plain potato, also likely to be hard to finish. There will be exceptions to both cases, but that's my point. Both intakes pose threats to homeostasis, the body's response to ensure that excessive amounts of these two different foods will become unappealing is going to be different. With potato, just about all the body has to "worry" about is excess glucose. Insulin response will be pivotal. With plain butter? It's going to be different, whatever hormonal etc. response discourages further intake, it's going to involve much less insulin. There are gut hormones, peptides etc. that affect appetite/satiety, there's some overlap, but a different response depending on the macronutrients in the food.

Suppose the average person would be grossed out at the same calorie level for plain potato as for butter. Maybe that's the way things should work, I doubt it. How about when things break down? How likely is it that these different homeostatic responses will break down symmetrically?

I find peanuts and cheese very palatable. If I'm eating more ketogenically, I can fit small amounts of peanuts and cheese into my diet. Say it's Christmas or somebody's birthday, and I eat too many carby, sugary treats. I might have been eating an ounce each of cheese and peanuts for a couple of weeks previously--after that holiday carb up, I won't be able to trust myself with those foods until I've been eating a stricter diet for at least a couple of days, depending on how extreme the excursion was.

I'll still like foods like cheese and peanuts when insulin is low, I just won't crave them. It's not just a matter of insulin being low--because if I fast, craving and binge tendencies go up. What seems likely is if insulin is low, and at the same time I am well-nourished, then cravings go down, both need to be true.

Paying attention to insulin makes paying attention to palatability more effective, and vice versa. For me it makes some of my favourite foods conditional no-no's instead of outright forbidden.


http://neurosciencenews.com/insulin...ne-levels-2934/

Quote:
Insulin, the hormone essential to all mammals for controlling blood sugar levels and a feeling of being full after eating, plays a much stronger role than previously known in regulating release of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that helps control the brain’s reward and pleasure centers, new studies by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center show.

“We found that when there’s more insulin in the brain, there will be more dopamine released, not less,” says study senior investigator and NYU Langone neuroscientist Margaret Rice, PhD. Her team’s new findings from laboratory and behavioral studies with rodents are set to appear in the journal Nature Communications online Oct. 27.

Rice says the experiments she and her colleagues conducted not only reaffirm that insulin helps trigger the reuptake of dopamine when insulin levels rise, but also are the first to show that the net effect is a rise in dopamine levels. The results may also be the first to demonstrate that insulin’s role in the dopamine pathway may affect and explain food choices.


Excessive dopamine release-->food intake, I like to look at this more as a resistance thing. I did a fast once, ended up binging on fairly bland food (oatmeal) when I broke it. Ridiculous how good that oatmeal tasted. I've seen vegan fasting advocates give "ability to enjoy simple, wholesome food," as a benefit of fasting. Even a vegan diet becomes highly palatable. How about if you're resistant to palatability? That is, it takes more "palatability" to trigger a pleasure response. There's always room for dessert... you might eat less of bland foods. Leptin lowers sensitivity to a sweet taste. This might work to make an apple less palatable, especially if it wasn't that sweet to begin with. It might make a marshmallow more palatable, since it might actually seem too sweet for a person who's more sensitive. People say you can't overeat apples, or at least that people generally won't. This was true for me at 190 pounds, I'd barely want to finish one. If I'm into the 150's--experience shows me that yes, then I will binge on apples.
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  #8   ^
Old Sun, Nov-05-17, 11:32
TucsonBill's Avatar
TucsonBill TucsonBill is offline
 
Plan: ≤ 20 carbs & IF
Stats: 292/241/170 Male 72 Inches
BF:
Progress: 42%
Location: Tucson, AZ
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The first time I (really) tried to quit smoking I used Chantix and did succeed in quitting, but started up again soon after discontinuing the Chantix. This time around, after reading that Chantix may cause or exacerbate T2D I decided to give Zyban (bupropion) a try. It did not work as fast or as well as the Chantix but tomorrow will be two months cigarette free and I'm still taking the bupropion as it's supposed to reduce the cravings.

I'm no expert, but I've read it does something with the dopamine in the brain and is also an effective weight loss supplement. I started taking the bupropion about the same time I started my LC WOE and I'm not having a lot of difficulty fasting.

Don't get me wrong, I am really enjoying my food when I eat, in fact more now because the food tastes better since I quit smoking and I take more time preparing and savoring my food when I eat, but I think the bupropion may be effecting my cravings for food as well as the cigarettes.

This time around, I want to be sure I've kicked the habit for good before I stop taking the bupropion. I'm gona give it another 30 days I think.

It will be interesting to see how my body reacts this time when I quit. Maybe I will taper off and go to half a pill a day for a week before I quit completely.
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