Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low-Carb Studies & Research / Media Watch > LC Research/Media
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Sat, Oct-21-17, 09:48
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 9,967
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/161/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 84%
Location: USA
Default How dark chocolate became a health food

No surprises to the nutritionally savvy among us. And this has not diminished my love of dark chocolate!

Quote:
The Mars company has sponsored hundreds of scientific studies to show cocoa is good for you.
...
Cadbury Jr.’s newest confection loaded just about every buzzy health trend into a fresh green-and-white package: vegan, ethically sourced, organic dark chocolate and creamy, superfood avocado. The company promised to deliver the nutrition of avocados — in a chocolate bar. Journalists were dazzled.

Wait, what? Make no mistake: This vegan avocado chocolate bar is candy. With nearly 600 calories and 43 grams of fat per 100-gram serving, the bar packs more fat and calories than Cadbury Dairy Milk, and just a little less sugar.
...
“Mars and [other chocolate companies] made a conscious decision to invest in science to transform the image of their product from a treat to a health food,” said New York University nutrition researcher Marion Nestle (no relation to the chocolate maker). “You can now sit there with your [chocolate bar] and say I’m getting my flavonoids.”

Amid a historic obesity epidemic, this new niche of nutrition science has helped build a solid aura of health around chocolate — and grow consumer demand. Chocolate retail sales in the US have risen from $14.2 billion in 2007 to $18.9 billion in 2017, the market research group Euromonitor International found, at a time when candy sales overall have been waning.
...
When you look at industry-funded studies, one thing becomes clear: They tend to focus on the health attributes of cocoa: its impact on cardiovascular health or cognitive function. But they don’t address the role the cocoa delivery mechanism — sugary chocolate — may play in obesity. Most Mars and Hershey chocolates also contain very small amounts of the cocoa that supposedly promotes heart health — along with lots of fat, sugar, and calories.

Dark chocolate is now a health food. Here’s how that happened.


We are alert to sugar and the overall healthy diet. We don't fall for the game. But be aware, that's all.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Sat, Oct-21-17, 10:10
Ambulo's Avatar
Ambulo Ambulo is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 777
 
Plan: No GPS/OMAD (23:1)
Stats: 150/123/120 Female 64 inches
BF:
Progress: 90%
Location: the North, England
Default

I'm happy with my organic 100% chocolate. Calories, schmalories
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Sun, Oct-22-17, 09:33
cshepard cshepard is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 351
 
Plan: Atkins - maintenance
Stats: 156/123/125 Female 64"
BF:
Progress: 106%
Location: BC, Canada
Default

From the post linked to above:

"And a diet heavy in chocolate is a diet heavy in sugar, calories, and fat."

Except when it's not. I would love to see some studies focusing on the benefits of non-candy cocoa in a healthy, sugar free diet.

I enjoy a lot of plain, unsweetened, cocoa powder - in my coffee, in spiced teas, as mole sauces and rubs and mixed with coconut cream in frozen desserts (with no added sugar or artificial sweeteners), and I believe that it is a good source of fibre, and potassium among other things.
The main trouble I see with chocolate is that everyone assumes you can only enjoy it as a sweetened candy bar. The deliciousness is still there if you can ween yourself off the sugar.
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Thu, Oct-26-17, 08:33
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 9,967
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/161/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 84%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cshepard
From the post linked to above:

"And a diet heavy in chocolate is a diet heavy in sugar, calories, and fat."

Except when it's not. I would love to see some studies focusing on the benefits of non-candy cocoa in a healthy, sugar free diet.

I enjoy a lot of plain, unsweetened, cocoa powder - in my coffee, in spiced teas, as mole sauces and rubs and mixed with coconut cream in frozen desserts (with no added sugar or artificial sweeteners), and I believe that it is a good source of fibre, and potassium among other things.
The main trouble I see with chocolate is that everyone assumes you can only enjoy it as a sweetened candy bar. The deliciousness is still there if you can ween yourself off the sugar.


I completely agree! I get high quality cocoa and add it to my whole milk, unsweetened, yogurt with berries; delightful! Shreds of baking chocolate also work.

It doesn't have to have the sugar. And there's nothing wrong with fat; cocoa butter, either.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:37.


Copyright © 2000-2017 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.