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  #1   ^
Old Fri, Sep-29-17, 07:55
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
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Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
BF:
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Location: Ontario
Default Battling belly fat: Specialized immune cells impair metabolism in aging

Quote:
In a new study, Yale researchers have described how nervous systems and immune systems talk to each other to control metabolism and inflammation. Their finding furthers scientists' understanding of why older adults fail to burn stored belly fat, which raises the risk of chronic disease. The study also points to potential therapeutic approaches to target the problem, the researchers said.

Led by Vishwa Deep Dixit, professor of comparative Medicine and immunobiology, the study was published Sept. 27 in Nature.

Older adults, regardless of body weight, have increased belly fat. However, when they need to expend energy, older people do not burn the energy stored in fat cells as efficiently as younger adults, leading to the accumulation of harmful belly fat. The underlying cause for this unresponsiveness in fat cells was unknown.

In the study, Dixit and his collaborators at Yale, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, and University of Bonn focused on specialized immune cells known as macrophages, which are typically involved in controlling infections. The Dixit lab discovered a new type of macrophage that resides on the nerves in belly fat. These nerve-associated macrophages become inflamed with age and do not allow the neurotransmitters, which are chemical messengers, to properly function.

The researchers also isolated the immune cells from fat tissue of young and old mice, and then sequenced the genome to understand the problem. "We discovered that the aged macrophages can break down the neurotransmitters called catecholamines, and thus do not allow fat cells to supply the fuel when demand arises," said Dixit, who is also a member of the Yale Center for Research on Aging.

The researchers found that when they lowered a specific receptor that controls inflammation, the NLRP3 inflammasome, in aged macrophages, the catecholamines could act to induce fat breakdown, similar to that of young mice.

"The key finding is that the immune cells talk to the nervous system to control metabolism," said Dixit.

In further experiments, the researchers blocked an enzyme that is increased in aged macrophages, restoring normal fat metabolism in older mice. Dixit noted that this enzyme, monoamine oxidase-A or MAOA, is inhibited by existing drugs in the treatment of depression. "Theoretically one could repurpose these MAOA inhibitor drugs to improve metabolism in aged individuals," he said. But he also cautioned that more research is needed to specifically target these drugs to belly fat and to test the safety of this approach.

In future research, Dixit and his colleagues will further examine the immune cells and their interaction with nerves, and how this neuro-immune dialogue controls health and disease. If controlling inflammation in aging immune cells can improve metabolism, it may have other positive effects on the nervous system or on the process of aging itself, said the researchers.

"The purpose of our research is to achieve greater understanding of immune cell interactions with nerves and fat cells to potentially reduce belly fat, enhance metabolism, and improve performance in the elderly," said Christina D. Camell, the first author of the study.


https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...70927133652.htm

If only there were some diet strategies that might reduce this inflammation, people would have something to try while waiting for lucrative drugs to hit the market.
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  #2   ^
Old Fri, Sep-29-17, 10:51
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
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Default

That was interesting Teaser.
You know what I noticed? I read some of the other articles and what they all had in common was that it ended with the comment that certain drugs might help.

A couple of years ago a doctor wanted to put me on certain steroids or immune suppressants and I didn't do it. Instead I reduced certain histamine releasing/causing foods and I think it has worked because I am much better.

~and of course, I think low-carb made all the difference as well.
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  #3   ^
Old Fri, Sep-29-17, 11:31
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thud123 thud123 is offline
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Plan: ~25NC/IF
Stats: 342.2/003.4/000 Male 72 inches
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
...If only there were some diet strategies that might reduce this inflammation, people would have something to try while waiting for lucrative drugs to hit the market.

Now that right there hit my funny bone. Thanks teaser!
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  #4   ^
Old Fri, Sep-29-17, 12:03
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 1,930
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
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Location: Herndon, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
If only there were some diet strategies that might reduce this inflammation, people would have something to try while waiting for lucrative drugs to hit the market.

It is probably incredibly naive, as studies are funded for only one reason (to make a drug that addresses the problem), but it would be helpful to determine if there are dietary interventions and what the process is to allow those interventions. Like I said, incredibly naive in our business first climate today for pharmaceutical companies.
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  #5   ^
Old Fri, Sep-29-17, 12:16
cotonpal's Avatar
cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Plan: very low carb real food
Stats: 245/128/135 Female 62
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Progress: 106%
Location: Vermont
Default

Mao inhibitors used traditionally as antidepressants contain their own dietary restrictions. From the Mayo site:

Quote:
Tyramine (TIE-ruh-meen) is an amino acid that helps regulate blood pressure. It occurs naturally in the body and it's found in certain foods. Medications called monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) block an enzyme known as monoamine oxidase, which breaks down excess tyramine in the body. Blocking this enzyme helps relieve depression.

If you take an MAOI and you eat high-tyramine foods, tyramine can quickly reach dangerous levels. This can cause a serious spike in blood pressure and require emergency treatment.

Avoid consuming foods that are high in tyramine if you take an MAOI. You may need to continue following a low-tyramine diet for a few weeks after you stop the medication.

Tyramine is naturally found in small amounts in protein-containing foods. As these foods age, the tyramine levels increase. Tyramine amounts can vary among foods due to different processing, storage and preparation methods. You can't reduce the amount of tyramine in a food by cooking it.

Examples of foods high in tyramine include:

Strong or aged cheeses, such as aged cheddar, Swiss and parmesan; blue cheeses such as Stilton and Gorgonzola; and Camembert. Cheeses made from pasteurized milk — such as American cheese, cottage cheese, ricotta, farmer cheese and cream cheese — are less likely to contain high levels of tyramine.
Cured meats, which are meats treated with salt and nitrate or nitrite, such as dry-type summer sausages, pepperoni and salami.
Smoked or processed meats, such as hot dogs, bologna, bacon, corned beef or smoked fish.
Pickled or fermented foods, such as sauerkraut, kimchee, caviar, tofu or pickles.
Sauces, such as soy sauce, shrimp sauce, fish sauce, miso and teriyaki sauce.
Soybeans and soybean products.
Snow peas, broad beans (fava beans) and their pods.
Dried or overripe fruits, such as raisins or prunes, or overripe bananas or avocados.
Meat tenderizers or meat prepared with tenderizers.
Yeast-extract spreads, such as Marmite, brewer's yeast or sour dough bread.
Alcoholic beverages, such as beer — especially tap or homebrewed beer — red wine, sherry and liqueurs.
Combination foods that contain any of the above ingredients.
Improperly stored foods or spoiled foods. While you're taking an MAOI, your doctor may recommend eating only fresh foods — not leftovers or foods past their freshness dates.


Jean
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  #6   ^
Old Fri, Sep-29-17, 12:22
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
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Jean, that's almost the same list I have of histamine releasing/causing foods...

Quote:
Histamine-Rich Foods:
•Fermented alcoholic beverages, especially wine, champagne and beer
•Fermented foods: sauerkraut, vinegar, soy sauce, kefir, yogurt, kombucha, etc
•Vinegar-containing foods: pickles, mayonnaise, olives
•Cured meats: bacon, salami, pepperoni, luncheon meats and hot dogs
•Soured foods: sour cream, sour milk, buttermilk, soured bread, etc
•Dried fruit: apricots, prunes, dates, figs, raisins
•Most citrus fruits
•Aged cheese including goat cheese
•Nuts: walnuts, cashews, and peanuts
•Vegetables: avocados, eggplant, spinach, and tomatoes
•Smoked fish and certain species of fish: mackerel, mahi-mahi, tuna, anchovies, sardines

Histamine-Releasing Foods:
•Alcohol
•Bananas
•Chocolate
•Cow’s Milk
•Nuts
•Papaya
•Pineapple
•Shellfish
•Strawberries
•Tomatoes
•Wheat Germ
•Many artificial preservatives and dyes

DAO-Blocking Foods:
•Alcohol
•Energy drinks
•Black tea
•Mate tea
•Green tea

Whew! That was a long list. You might be wondering now what on earth you CAN eat, so I've made a list of low histamine foods as well. Remember that freshness is key when you have histamine intolerance!

Here's a list of low-histamine foods:
•freshly cooked meat, poultry (frozen or fresh)
•freshly caught fish
•eggs
•gluten-free grains: rice, quinoa
•pure peanut butter
•fresh fruits: mango, pear, watermelon, apple, kiwi, cantaloupe, grapes
•fresh vegetables (except tomatoes, spinach, avocado, and eggplant)
•dairy substitutes: coconut milk, rice milk, hemp milk, almond milk
•cooking oils: olive oil, coconut oil
•leafy herbs
•herbal teas

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-1117...ntolerance.html

Spices/sauces that might cause problems:
ascorbic acid
autolyzed yeast
BHA and BHT
benzoates
catsup (ketchup)
cayenne
cloves
chili powder
horseradish
hot curry powder
hydrolyzed protein
meat tenderizers
miso
mustard
oleoresin paprika
paprika
pickles
red pepper
soy sauce
tamari
vinegar
worcestershire sauce
MSG – monosodium glutamate
metabisulfites
sulfites
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  #7   ^
Old Fri, Sep-29-17, 13:53
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 1,930
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Interesting that Dr. Ede has just published an article comparing results between a dietary approach and an approaches using medications:

http://mail.forum.lowcarber.org/sho...550#post9231550
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  #8   ^
Old Fri, Sep-29-17, 14:30
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/183/160 Female 5'4"
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Default

Great article!

Just stabilizing of BS spikes which also cuts down on the amount of insulin the body is producing and pumping out has got to be something in itself and then the Ketogenic effects that follow.

I just so happen to know the exact person who should read this and asked me for an article just yesterday. This will really help her understand this whole LC thing.
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  #9   ^
Old Fri, Sep-29-17, 21:13
Dodger's Avatar
Dodger Dodger is offline
Posts: 8,251
 
Plan: Paleoish
Stats: 225/175/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 100%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
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Quote:
These nerve-associated macrophages become inflamed with age and do not allow the neurotransmitters, which are chemical messengers, to properly function.
I have a feeling that many years of high carb ingestion allows advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) to damage the macrophages.
I'm 70-year-old and have been low-carbing for 15 years. Today I did a 103-mile bike ride and ate nothing during the ride. My body has become efficient in burning fat.
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  #10   ^
Old Sat, Sep-30-17, 02:41
Ambulo's Avatar
Ambulo Ambulo is online now
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Posts: 813
 
Plan: No GPS/OMAD (23:1)
Stats: 150/124/120 Female 64 inches
BF:
Progress: 87%
Location: the North, England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
I'm 70-year-old and have been low-carbing for 15 years. Today I did a 103-mile bike ride and ate nothing during the ride. My body has become efficient in burning fat.


wow is the only response. Gives,me something to which to aspire in six more years.
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