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  #16   ^
Old Sun, Sep-03-17, 05:16
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 9,962
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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NPR:

Has Salt Gotten An Unfair Shake?

Information from both The Salt Fix and the new PURE study.

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-...rtisans-say-yes
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  #17   ^
Old Mon, Sep-04-17, 07:17
PaCarolSue PaCarolSue is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 390
 
Plan: Wheat Belly
Stats: 217/192.5/175 Female 5ft 2 inches
BF:lots/lots/less
Progress: 58%
Location: USA
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I am one of the few people who don't like a salty taste, so I rarely salt my food at the table and use very little in cooking. If I'm eating out, I can't order soup, because their soup is usually too salty for my taste. I do, however, have high blood pressure, regardless.

I love green onions dipped in salt! And I can't eat eggs or tomatoes without salt.
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  #18   ^
Old Mon, Sep-04-17, 07:40
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thud123 thud123 is offline
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Posts: 4,478
 
Plan: ~25NC/IF
Stats: 342.2/208/000 Male 72 inches
BF:
Progress: 39%
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I saw Meme's salt well on this thread and was reminded that I use salt very differently than most of my family and friends. I'm the only one I know that has salt in an open container ready to use, esp, in cooking - never measured. Someone also mentioned dipping vegetables in salt, same here - cuce chips last night when I was too lazy to make a proper salad

It look like my little china dish needs some cleaning from all the dipping and messing fingers going back in for more. I figure salt is a pretty good anti bacterial so I don't mind much...



Eat. More. Salt.
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  #19   ^
Old Mon, Sep-04-17, 07:46
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Posts: 2,149
 
Plan: Dr. Bernstein
Stats: 188/160/135 Female 5 ft 4 inches
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Progress: 53%
Location: NE WA
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Tried dipping my celery in salt & went back for more! It's good. Now I'll have to try the green onions.
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  #20   ^
Old Mon, Nov-06-17, 15:41
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 9,962
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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The Downside of a Low Salt Diet, on Dr Hyman's blog, written by Dr James J. DiNicolantonio

http://drhyman.com/blog/2017/11/03/...e-low-salt-diet
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  #21   ^
Old Sun, Feb-04-18, 09:31
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Merpig Merpig is offline
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Plan: IF/Fung IDM/Potato Hack?
Stats: 375/272.6/175 Female 66 inches
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neo_crone
Comments on chapter 2 of the The Salt Fix from Matthew Dalby
https://honey-guide.com/2017/08/21/evolving-salt/
I just began reading The Salt Fix this week (yeah, late to the party). I’m perfectly ready to be convinced that salt is not the enemy based on all the other crazy dietary advice we’ve gotten over the decades, so the book is sort of “preaching to the choir” to me, even though I don’t actively measure my sodium intake.

However Dalby’s review of chapter 2 was interesting and I would have been curious about his take on other chapters. I admit I sort of skimmed the chapter myself as I had more interest in the clinical studies and less about prehistoric humans. I admit I was pretty turned off by the referral to the current great apes 🦍 as “pre-human” which was a big reason why I skipped most of that chapter.

So I’m still not too far into the book. I’m perfectly happy with the idea that sugar is the demon and salt is not. But I do wonder what other facts he may have twisted. I mean did he really cite an article in the *Daily Mail* as a reference??
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  #22   ^
Old Sun, Feb-04-18, 21:06
mike_d's Avatar
mike_d mike_d is offline
Grease is the word!
Posts: 8,136
 
Plan: PSMF/IF
Stats: 236/181/180 Male 72 inches
BF:disappearing!
Progress: 98%
Location: Alamo city, Texas
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Saw the cows today frantically licking the salt and mineral blocks. Grinding sounds as they tried to bite off chunks of it. I almost felt like joining in, but settled for some salty meat jerky
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  #23   ^
Old Sun, Feb-04-18, 21:13
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/183/160 Female 5'4"
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Mine love the mineral block too!
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  #24   ^
Old Tue, Mar-06-18, 07:49
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
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Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
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Quote:
A healthy diet may not offset the effects of a high salt intake on blood pressure, suggests a new study.

The research, from scientists at a number of institutions, including Imperial College London and Northwestern University, analysed the diets of over 4,000 people.

The results, published in the journal Hypertension, showed that people eating higher amounts of salt had higher blood pressure -- no matter how healthy a person's overall diet.

The scientists behind the research are now advising people to monitor their salt intake -- and for food manufacturers to lower the salt content in their products.

High blood pressure affects more than one in four adults in the UK, and increases the risk of a number of conditions including heart attacks and stroke. It's thought to have a number of causes, including age, weight and eating too much salt.

It's thought that vitamins and minerals in fruit and vegetables might in some way affect blood vessels, enabling them to lower blood pressure.

Previously, experts believed that eating high amounts of fruit and vegetables might help counteract the effect of high salt on blood pressure.

However while these foods do tend to lower blood pressure, the new research suggests they do not counteract the adverse influence of salt intake.

In the paper, the team studied data from the so-called INTERMAP study. In this study, which was conducted between 1997-1999, scientists tracked the diets of 4,680 people, aged 40-59, from the USA, UK, Japan and China. The volunteers were tracked over four days, and two urine samples were taken during this time. Measurements of height, weight and blood pressure were also taken. The study data has since been used for numerous research projects.

In the latest paper, published today, the team assessed concentrations of sodium and potassium in the urine samples. Sodium is the main component of salt, while potassium, which is found in green leafy vegetables, has been linked to lower blood pressure.

The team also used dietary data to assess the volunteers' intake of over 80 nutrients that may be linked to low blood pressure, including vitamin C, fibre, and omega-3 fatty acids. Many of these nutrients are found in fruit, vegetables and whole grains.

The researchers found a correlation between high blood pressure and higher salt intake, even in people who were eating a high amount of potassium and other nutrients. The researchers estimated salt intake by analysing sodium in the urine, as well as analysing dietary data.

The recommended upper limit of adult salt intake in the UK is 6g a day -- around one teaspoon.

The study found that average salt intake across the study was 10.7g a day. The average intake for the UK was 8.5g, while the intake for the USA, China and Japan were 9.6g, 13.4g and 11.7g respectively.

Increasing salt intake above this average amount was linked to an increased in blood pressure. An increase of an additional 7g (1.2 teaspoons) of salt above the average intake was associated with an increase in systolic blood pressure of 3.7 mmHg.

Blood pressure is measured in two numbers -- the first, called systolic pressure, measures the force the heart pumps blood around the body. The second number, called diastolic pressure, is the resistance to blood flow in the arteries. Ideally, blood pressure should be between 90/60 and 120/80 mmHg. However, reducing blood pressure by just a small amount can reduce the risk of conditions such as stroke.

Dr Queenie Chan, joint lead author of the research from the School of Public Health at Imperial, said the research shows the importance of cutting salt intake.

"We currently have a global epidemic of high salt intake -- and high blood pressure. This research shows there are no cheats when it comes to reducing blood pressure. Having a low salt diet is key -- even if your diet is otherwise healthy and balanced."

She added: "As a large amount of the salt in our diet comes from processed food, we are urging food manufacturers to take steps to reduce salt in their products."

The team acknowledge that because the data was collected over four days, it provides information from a snapshot of time. They now hope to focus on longer term studies, with a greater number of people.


https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...80305093002.htm

Quote:
Previously, experts believed that eating high amounts of fruit and vegetables might help counteract the effect of high salt on blood pressure.

However while these foods do tend to lower blood pressure, the new research suggests they do not counteract the adverse influence of salt intake.


Well, maybe that's the thing. If fruits and vegetables associate with better outcomes, it might be that they associate with a better dietary pattern. Now you tell people, whatever else you're up to, make sure you eat your fruit and veggies. So maybe you have some cut up carrots, an apple, and a bag of chips for lunch. Your diet can be mostly crud, but high in fruits and vegetables. So you get manufacturers to make low sodium processed foods--and now people can eat a cruddy diet, high in fruits and vegetables and rich in processed foods, and low in sodium.
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  #25   ^
Old Tue, Mar-06-18, 08:01
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 2,086
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
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Location: Herndon, VA
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Another epidemiological study that means nothing; yet, they're taking some information from the late 90s and publishing it today with new insights? Incredible. You'd almost think someone had an agenda . . . .

Quote:
In the paper, the team studied data from the so-called INTERMAP study. In this study, which was conducted between 1997-1999, scientists tracked the diets of 4,680 people, aged 40-59, from the USA, UK, Japan and China. The volunteers were tracked over four days, and two urine samples were taken during this time. Measurements of height, weight and blood pressure were also taken. The study data has since been used for numerous research projects.

Input for numerous research projects? It's a very neat trick being able to bend simple correlation likely based on inaccurate responses to questionnaires into fact and root cause.
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  #26   ^
Old Tue, Mar-06-18, 08:50
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
Posts: 8,438
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/183/160 Female 5'4"
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Progress: 54%
Location: Texas
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Since this thread is about salt, can anyone tell me the name of the salt that is high in potassium?
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  #27   ^
Old Tue, Mar-06-18, 08:56
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 2,086
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
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Nu-Salt is potassium chloride and used as a salt (sodium chloride) substitute.
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  #28   ^
Old Tue, Mar-06-18, 08:58
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/183/160 Female 5'4"
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Progress: 54%
Location: Texas
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Nu-salt!
Thank you!
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  #29   ^
Old Tue, Mar-06-18, 15:33
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Dodger Dodger is offline
Posts: 8,266
 
Plan: Paleoish
Stats: 225/175/175 Male 71.5 inches
BF:18%
Progress: 100%
Location: Longmont, Colorado
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I use Morton Lite Salt which is a 50/50 mixture of potassium chloride and sodium chloride.
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  #30   ^
Old Tue, Mar-06-18, 22:45
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
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Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/183/160 Female 5'4"
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger
I use Morton Lite Salt which is a 50/50 mixture of potassium chloride and sodium chloride.


Thank you!!
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