Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Low-Carb Studies & Research / Media Watch > LC Research/Media
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Thu, Aug-03-17, 06:20
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 10,849
 
Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 89%
Location: Ontario
Default Brain 'switch' tells body to burn fat after a meal

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...70801193339.htm

Quote:
Scientists at Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute have found a mechanism by which the brain coordinates feeding with energy expenditure, solving a puzzle that has previously eluded researchers and offering a potential novel target for the treatment of obesity.

Obesity -- a major risk factor for many diseases including cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, liver disease and several cancers -- is at epidemic levels in Australia.

Researchers from the Metabolic Disease and Obesity Program have shown in laboratory models that feeding controls the 'browning' of fat, that is, the conversion of white fat, which stores energy, into brown fat, which expends it. Fat in the human body is stored in specialised cells called adipocytes, which can change from white to brown states and back again.

Their study, published in Cell Metabolism today, shows that after a meal the brain responds to circulating insulin, which is increased after a rise in blood glucose. The brain then sends signals to promote the browning of fat to expend energy. By contrast, after a fast, the brain instructs these browned adipocytes to once more convert into white adipocytes, storing energy. These processes help prevent both excess weight gain and excess weight loss in response to feeding and fasting, meaning body weight remains relatively stable over time.

The researchers showed that the brain's ability to sense insulin and coordinate feeding with energy expenditure via browning is controlled by a switch-like mechanism turned on after fasting to inhibit the response to insulin, repressing browning and conserving energy, and turned off after feeding to facilitate the insulin response to promote browning and to expend energy.

"What happens in the context of obesity is that the switch stays on all the time -- it doesn't turn on off during feeding," lead researcher Professor Tony Tiganis said.

"As a consequence, browning is turned off all the time and energy expenditure is decreased all the time, so when you eat, you don't see a commensurate increase in energy expenditure -- and that promotes weight gain," Professor Tiganis said.

Previous investigations by the researchers that showed how the brain coordinates white adipose tissue browning attracted considerable attention after it was published in early 2015.

"For a long time, the missing piece to the puzzle was always why this occurs in the body," first author Dr Garron Dodd said.

"We've shown not only why this occurs but also the fundamental mechanism involved. It's very exciting," Dr Dodd said.

The researchers are further exploring the possibility of inhibiting the switch for therapeutic purposes to promote the shedding of excess fat.

"Obesity is a major and leading factor in overall disease burden worldwide and is poised, for the first time in modern history, to lead to falls in overall life expectancy," Professor Tiganis said.

"What our studies have shown is that there is a fundamental mechanism at play that normally ensures that energy expenditure is matched with energy intake. When this is defective, you put on more weight. Potentially we may be able to rewire this mechanism to promote energy expenditure and weight loss in obese individuals. But any potential therapy is a long way off," he said.



Interesting because it sort of ties together studies where insulin administered directly to the brain reduced bodyweight with the observation that the elevated insulin levels in obesity and insulin resistance don't exactly seem to be slimming. For a while it was very fashionable when criticizing a low carb diet to bring up the supposed appetited-suppression, anti-obesogenic role of insulin, I don't know if that's fallen out of fashion or if I've just stopped visiting those websites.

Quote:
"What happens in the context of obesity is that the switch stays on all the time -- it doesn't turn on off during feeding," lead researcher Professor Tony Tiganis said.


One thing about meal timing, eating windows or intermittent fasting--besides abstaining from food, often when you do eat, you'll eat more. It's possible there's a stronger "fed" signal. The prolonged absence of food lowers insulin, maybe increasing sensitivity to this mechanism, with a good solid feeding taking advantage of the increased sensitivity.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Thu, Aug-03-17, 06:41
khrussva's Avatar
khrussva khrussva is offline
Posts: 5,532
 
Plan: My own - < 30 net carbs
Stats: 440/200/210 Male 5' 11"
BF:Energy Unleashed
Progress: 104%
Location: Central Virginia - USA
Default

This does seem to make some sense given my experiences. I get cold and tolerate the heat much better when I'm fasting. If I'm eating regularly, I'm not cold at a normal room temperature. I've also noticed that if I overeat I will roast at night and sleep only with a sheet. If I'm fasting I bundle up at night with a blanket and comforter. I've also been fairly weight stable for the past year. Perhaps this is just brown fat & white fat doing its job.

IMO it appears that they have missed the boat (again) implying that obesity is the problem through association. What came first? The chicken or the egg. If you follow the logic in their own analysis of the issue that body wants to remain weight stable. Then something breaks that turns off the brown fat signaling. After that the weight starts piling on. So again, it seems to me that obesity is just a symptom of the problem. The focus should be on what causes the system to break down and stop functioning properly. For me, I think I've figured that out. Too many carbohydrates in my diet.

Last edited by khrussva : Thu, Aug-03-17 at 07:03.
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Thu, Aug-03-17, 08:40
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 1,689
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by khrussva
IMO it appears that they have missed the boat (again) implying that obesity is the problem through association. What came first? The chicken or the egg. If you follow the logic in their own analysis of the issue that body wants to remain weight stable. Then something breaks that turns off the brown fat signaling. After that the weight starts piling on. So again, it seems to me that obesity is just a symptom of the problem. The focus should be on what causes the system to break down and stop functioning properly. For me, I think I've figured that out. Too many carbohydrates in my diet.

My concerns as well. It's nice to understand the underlying mechanism in order to "turn off" the switch. What's also nice is to understand how to manipulate the switch through diet composition. Wouldn't that seem the be the healthier approach?
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Sun, Aug-06-17, 17:47
M Levac M Levac is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 6,197
 
Plan: VLC, mostly meat
Stats: 202/200/165 Male 5' 7"
BF:
Progress: 5%
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Default

Quote:
Their study, published in Cell Metabolism today, shows that after a meal the brain responds to circulating insulin, which is increased after a rise in blood glucose. The brain then sends signals to promote the browning of fat to expend energy. By contrast, after a fast, the brain instructs these browned adipocytes to once more convert into white adipocytes, storing energy.

No.
Quote:
"What happens in the context of obesity is that the switch stays on all the time -- it doesn't turn on off during feeding," lead researcher Professor Tony Tiganis said.

No.

If eating (therefore insulin) causes browning (therefore greater Eout) then how is obesity created in the first place, when obesity is said to be created by more eating (therefore more insulin, therefore more browing, therefore more greater Eout)? See what I mean by "No."?

I'd like to cite diabetes type 1, where there's no insulin, there's hyperphagia, and there's emaciation. Hyperphagia therefore expected insulin, but no insulin because diabetes type 1 therefore no browing, yet no fat accumulation. Pfft, go to hospital, diagnose, treat, inject insulin, voila - fat accumulation. Be not-smart, inject insulin in same spot for years, voila - localized excess fat accumulation in a process called insulin-induced lipohypertrophy. Eat more carbs, inject more insulin (because eat more carbs - insulin dose depends on carbs, you see), voila - more fat accumulation all over the place. Incidentally, when that happens, the insulin-induced lipohypertrophy becomes invisible due to the amount of fat everywhere. This suggests that insulin-induced lipohypertrophy is also a system-wide phenomenon rather than just localized to the injection site(s). Anyways, the whole thing contradicts the idea that insulin somehow causes adipocytes to go brown after a meal.

Finally, biology doesn't waste for no reason. If there's excess energy, it will be used, not merely disposed.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:55.


Copyright © 2000-2017 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.