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  #1   ^
Old Fri, Jul-21-17, 21:23
VLC.MD VLC.MD is offline
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Default Sugar-sweetened drinks cut your metabolism [aka: Coke makes you fat and cold]

Sugar-sweetened drinks and your metabolism

The next time you tuck into a protein rich dinner, it may be a good idea to hold off on the sugary drinks. A new study published in BMC Nutrition found that a combination of sugar sweetened drinks and a protein rich meal decreases metabolic efficiency, which can lead to more fat being stored. Here to tell us more is lead author of the study Dr. Shanon Casperson. 21 Jul 2017

Letís face it, sugar tastes good. (Ewww). Added sugars account for approximately 16% of total energy intake. Thatís around 6 tablespoons (91 grams) of added sugar every day. The largest source of added sugars in our diet is from sugar-sweetened drinks. This is why a large amount of research is focused on the health effects of these types of drinks.

The beneficial effects of protein-rich diets are well documented. Increasing protein intake increases satiety, increases metabolism and decreases energy intake. But what happens when we drink a sugar-sweetened beverage with our steak dinner? How does this change how our body processes and uses the nutrients from the meal?


The 12-by-10-foot metabolic chamber that participants spent 24 hours in.

To answer these questions, we asked volunteers to spend 24 hours in a metabolic chamber on two separate occasions. The metabolic chamber is a 12-by-10-foot hermetically controlled room. This allows us to measure exactly how the body is using the nutrients from the foods. By having someone stay in a metabolic chamber, we can determine how many grams of carbohydrate, protein and fat the volunteer is using and how many calories theyíre burning every minute.

We found that drinking a sugar-sweetened drink with a meal significantly decreases fat use and diet-induced thermogenesis (heat production). And when we paired the sugar-sweetened drink with a protein-rich meal, the combination further decreased fat use and diet-induced thermogenesis by more than 40%. Additionally, we found that, over the course of a day, the body only expended 80 of the 120 kcals that was provided by the sugar-sweetened drink, thus creating a 40-kcal surplus independent of how much protein was in the meal.

These results highlight the impact that consuming a sugar-sweetened drink can have on energy balance and fat use. One implication of the results is that the bodyís reduced metabolic efficiency after drinking a sugar-sweetened beverage can lead to a greater tendency to make and store fat. Our findings provide further insight into the potential role of sugar-sweetened drinks in the etiology of obesity.

Portions of the article were not included. for the full article ...
Source: http://blogs.biomedcentral.com/bmcs...our-metabolism/
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  #2   ^
Old Sun, Jul-23-17, 18:28
mudgie mudgie is offline
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I'd love to see the same test with artificial sweeteners.
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  #3   ^
Old Mon, Jul-24-17, 03:19
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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I should probably go read the full article to find out if they tried unsweetened fruit juice too (need to leave for work soon, so I just don't have time right now), but it would be interesting to find out if there was any difference at all between a sugar sweetened drink, and the same number of calories from fruit juice. I'd be very surprised if there was a difference, much less a statistically significant difference between the two.

Or how about comparing it to skim milk, to see if there's some way in which the presence of protein bound to the same number of calories from lactose in the milk (ETA: as opposed to being a separate component of the meal) makes any kind of difference.

And yes, it'd be interesting to know the results with artificial sweeteners too.
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  #4   ^
Old Mon, Jul-24-17, 05:10
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teaser teaser is online now
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They actually used artificial sweetener as the control.

Quote:
For all testing procedures, the volunteers ate the exact same foods throughout the day. During one of the visits, they ate a diet consisting of 15% protein and for the other visit they ate a diet consisting of 30% protein. At each meal, they had either a sugar-sweetened drink or an artificially sweetened drink. After each meal, we asked the participant about their hunger and desire to eat certain types of foods.


So maybe what we should want to see is a study with sugar and sweetener vs. plain water. We can't know whether the sweetener had an effect compared to that.

Quote:
Additionally, we found that, over the course of a day, the body only expended 80 of the 120 kcals that was provided by the sugar-sweetened drink, thus creating a 40-kcal surplus independent of how much protein was in the meal.


So, there's some stuff in the text about reduced thermogenesis. But over the course of the day, the people on sugar ate 120 calories more than the people on sweeteners--and burned 80 calories more than they did. So while thermogenesis in the rested, post-meal state was lower, perhaps they paced around more or were twitchier at some point during the postabsorptive state.

Pairing the sugar with the higher protein meal increased the decrease in thermogenesis--but there's that 40 calorie surplus "independent of how much protein" to deal with.

If you stuck me in that little chamber, and researchers I didn't know very well poked and prodded at me all day, I think that alone would have a strong effect on my metabolism. The stress would likely have me bouncing off the walls.
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  #5   ^
Old Mon, Jul-24-17, 09:53
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
If you stuck me in that little chamber, and researchers I didn't know very well poked and prodded at me all day, I think that alone would have a strong effect on my metabolism. The stress would likely have me bouncing off the walls.


You & me both!
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