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  #1   ^
Old Thu, Jun-08-17, 07:26
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
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Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
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Default White bread or whole wheat? Choose yer poison.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...70606135754.htm

Quote:
Despite many studies looking at which bread is the healthiest, it is still not clear what effect bread and differences among bread types have on clinically relevant parameters and on the microbiome. In the journal Cell Metabolism on June 6, Weizmann Institute researchers report the results of a comprehensive, randomized trial in 20 healthy subjects comparing differences in how processed white bread and artisanal whole wheat sourdough affect the body.

Surprisingly, the investigators found the bread itself didn't greatly affect the participants and that different people reacted differently to the bread. The research team then devised an algorithm to help predict how individuals may respond to the bread in their diets.

All of the participants in the study normally consumed about 10% of their calories from bread. Half were assigned to consume an increased amount of processed, packaged white bread for a week -- around 25% of their calories -- and half to consume an increased amount of whole wheat sourdough, which was baked especially for the study and delivered fresh to the participants. After a 2-week period without bread, the diets for the two groups were reversed.

Before the study and throughout the time it was ongoing, many health effects were monitored. These included wakeup glucose levels; levels of the essential minerals calcium, iron, and magnesium; fat and cholesterol levels; kidney and liver enzymes; and several markers for inflammation and tissue damage. The investigators also measured the makeup of the participants' microbiomes before, during, and after the study.

"The initial finding, and this was very much contrary to our expectation, was that there were no clinically significant differences between the effects of these two types of bread on any of the parameters that we measured," says Eran Segal, a computational biologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science and one of the study's senior authors. "We looked at a number of markers, and there was no measurable difference in the effect that this type of dietary intervention had."

Based on some of their earlier work, however, which found that different people have different glycemic responses to the same diet, the investigators suspected that something more complicated may be going on: perhaps the glycemic response of some of the people in the study was better to one type of bread, and some better to the other type. A closer look indicated that this was indeed the case. About half the people had a better response to the processed, white flour bread, and the other half had a better response to the whole wheat sourdough. The lack of differences were only seen when all findings were averaged together.

"The findings for this study are not only fascinating but potentially very important, because they point toward a new paradigm: different people react differently, even to the same foods," says Eran Elinav (~EranElinav), a researcher in the Department of Immunology at the Weizmann Institute and another of the study's senior authors. "To date, the nutritional values assigned to food have been based on minimal science, and one-size-fits-all diets have failed miserably."

He adds: "These findings could lead to a more rational approach for telling people which foods are a better fit for them, based on their microbiomes."

Avraham Levy, a professor in the Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences and another coauthor, adds a caveat to the study: "These experiments looked at everyone eating the same amounts of carbohydrates from both bread types, which means that they ate more whole wheat bread because it contains less available carbohydrates. Moreover, we know that because of its high fiber content, people generally eat less whole wheat bread. We didn't take into consideration how much you would eat based on how full you felt. So the story must go on."


Half of participants having higher blood glucose with wheat bread, half with white bread sounds pretty random to me. Reshuffling the data until you find some evidence that your funding was well-spent isn't really playing fair.

Also the bit about people eating less whole bread due to the high fiber count is a likely bit of hooey. Maybe scientists should reference all of their statements, not just those in science journals. Whole wheat never slowed me down any.
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  #2   ^
Old Thu, Jun-08-17, 07:46
Rosebud's Avatar
Rosebud Rosebud is offline
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You got it right in your thread title, mate: it's all poison. *shrug*

I'm not even a little bit surprised that they found no clinically significant differences between the two types of bread. Wheat is wheat, after all.
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  #3   ^
Old Thu, Jun-08-17, 09:40
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Quote:
We didn't take into consideration how much you would eat based on how full you felt.


Doh! With insights like these, no wonder "nutritional science" is practically an oxymoron.
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  #4   ^
Old Thu, Jun-08-17, 11:23
Ambulo's Avatar
Ambulo Ambulo is offline
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Plan: No GPS/OMAD (23:1)
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Pity they didn't test the "no bread" option while they were at it. Wonder why not.
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  #5   ^
Old Thu, Jun-08-17, 14:55
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mike_d mike_d is offline
Grease is the word!
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Plan: PSMF/IF
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Default

In this case, I like the comparison to: "filtered vs. unfiltered" cigarettes. Already been unfairly used in the media comparing red meat to bacon
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  #6   ^
Old Thu, Jun-08-17, 14:57
mike_d's Avatar
mike_d mike_d is offline
Grease is the word!
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Plan: PSMF/IF
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambulo
Pity they didn't test the "no bread" option while they were at it. Wonder why not.
Well, "everyone knows we can't live without bread or other carbohydrates"

CBS News picked up the article, embellished, it but they didn't say anything about no bread either?
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  #7   ^
Old Thu, Jun-08-17, 15:30
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deirdra deirdra is offline
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Plan: HF/vLC/GF,CF,SF
Stats: 197/136/150 Female 66 inches
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambulo
Pity they didn't test the "no bread" option while they were at it. Wonder why not.
I was thinking the same thing; the result would probably have proved that "no bread" is the much healthier option.
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  #8   ^
Old Tue, Nov-21-17, 11:45
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Whirrlly Whirrlly is online now
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yea the wheat vs white. what a total joke. Like a carb is different in either? duh LOL
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  #9   ^
Old Tue, Nov-21-17, 13:50
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Merpig Merpig is offline
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Plan: IF/Fung IDM/Potato Hack?
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...70606135754.htm

Also the bit about people eating less whole bread due to the high fiber count is a likely bit of hooey. Maybe scientists should reference all of their statements, not just those in science journals. Whole wheat never slowed me down any.
Yeah, in fact when I read this my first thought was “packaged, processed white bread, blech. But freshly baked whole wheat sourdough? I could really chow down on that!” Though of course I don’t, but there are times I really miss it.

I used to vacation out in the country in New Brunswick, Canada every summer. There was a German farmwife who had a bakery at her farm and made the most amazing 🍞 bread. I loved her 7-grain bread - nothing in it but the 7 grains, sea salt, yeast, farm well water, and a tad of honey. I would eat that bread at every meal! But her other breads were all awesome too. Even after I went LCHF I would allow myself that bread during my two weeks up there in the summer. And yet it never affected my health in the way commercial breads in the US did.

But luckily those commercial breads have no appeal for me at all. Very easy to avoid. But theses studies? Yeah, never a “no bread” option.

Lately I’ve read some silly articles pushed on me by Facebook or Google about the perils of gluten-free eating. One doctor’s take was that people would suffer malnutrition because of missing out on all the good vitamins and minerals in bread. What? White bread flour that has been stripped bare of nutrients of any sort and then had selected vitamins and minerals added back in? That’s what people are missing out on? Sheesh, give ‘em a vitamin pill doc.
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  #10   ^
Old Thu, Nov-23-17, 07:40
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Merpig
Lately I’ve read some silly articles pushed on me by Facebook or Google about the perils of gluten-free eating. One doctor’s take was that people would suffer malnutrition because of missing out on all the good vitamins and minerals in bread. What? White bread flour that has been stripped bare of nutrients of any sort and then had selected vitamins and minerals added back in? That’s what people are missing out on? Sheesh, give ‘em a vitamin pill doc.


It's outright lies, because comparing meat to bread... well, there's just no comparison, on any nutrient you pick.
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  #11   ^
Old Thu, Nov-23-17, 07:56
thud123's Avatar
thud123 thud123 is offline
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Plan: ~25NC/IF
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I choose white over wheat. I was given this advice by the choose mothers that choose Jif.
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  #12   ^
Old Sun, Nov-26-17, 11:13
Whirrlly's Avatar
Whirrlly Whirrlly is online now
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Plan: Zero Carb!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thud123
I choose white over wheat. I was given this advice by the choose mothers that choose Jif.


Hystical! too funny!! love it!
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