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  #1   ^
Old Sun, Apr-23-17, 00:36
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default Kellogg’s smothers health crisis in sugar

Quote:
From The Sunday Times
London, UK
23 April, 2017

Kellogg’s smothers health crisis in sugar

The cereals giant is funding studies that undermine official warnings on obesity


Kellogg’s, the world’s leading cereal manufacturer, has spent millions of pounds on research to counter claims that its sugar-laden products are fuelling the obesity crisis.

The food giant has been attacked for putting more sugar in some of its breakfast cereals than is found in cakes, doughnuts and ice creams. A bowl of its Crunchy Nut cereal can contain more than half the recommended maximum intake of added sugar for a six-year-old.

Now The Sunday Times has established that Kellogg’s helped fund a report, published in a medical journal in December, attacking the UK government’s recommendations to cut sugar intake. It has also funded British studies suggesting that eating cereals may help children stay a healthy weight.

Simon Capewell, a founder of Action on Sugar and a professor in public health and policy at Liverpool University, called on Kellogg’s to publish a full list of the scientists and research organisations to whom it pays professional fees and research grants. Coca-Cola published a similar list in 2015 after a row over how its research funding was influencing the debate over public health.

“They are funding scientists and organisations to undermine the established evidence that eating too much sugar is harmful,” Capewell said.

One of the food research organisations funded by Kellogg’s is the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI). Last year it funded research in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine that said the advice to cut sugar by Public Health England and other bodies such as the World Health Organisation could not be trusted.

The study, which claimed official guidance to cut sugar was based on “low-quality evidence”, stated it had been funded by an ILSI technical committee. Only by searching elsewhere for a list of committee members did it become clear that this comprised 15 food firms, including Kellogg’s, Coca-Cola and Tate & Lyle.

In 2013 Kellogg’s funded British research that concluded “regular consumption of breakfast cereals” might help children stay slimmer. The study, published in the journal Obesity Facts, relied on evidence from 14 studies. Seven of those studies were funded by Kellogg’s and five were funded by the cereal company General Mills.

Margaret Ashwell, a consultant to the food industry and one of the authors of the study, said last week all interests had been correctly disclosed.

Terence Kealey, a former vice-chancellor at Buckingham University and author of Breakfast Is a Dangerous Meal, warned last month that the scientific community had “fooled itself” about the benefits of breakfast.

Kellogg’s said it was committed to “slowly reducing sugar” in its products. A spokesman said: “As a low-calorie, grain-based food choice we believe cereals have a role to play in tackling obesity. We follow appropriate guidelines for transparency and disclosure.”

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/...sugar-22lrvs0vp
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  #2   ^
Old Sun, Apr-23-17, 06:47
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Of course. Because it worked so well before, didn't it?

Sugar IS the new tobacco!
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  #3   ^
Old Sun, Apr-23-17, 08:53
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Default

I agree, but it's even more pernicious than tobacco, as it can be consumed by people of all ages, where tobacco use starts later in life (teens, 20s) for most people.
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  #4   ^
Old Sun, Apr-23-17, 11:24
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
I agree, but it's even more pernicious than tobacco, as it can be consumed by people of all ages, where tobacco use starts later in life (teens, 20s) for most people.


Absolutely. We give it to BABIES.
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