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  #1   ^
Old Thu, Apr-20-17, 23:58
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Default Stroke and dementia risk linked to artificial sweeteners, study suggests

Quote:
From The Guardian
London, UK
20 April, 2017

Stroke and dementia risk linked to artificial sweeteners, study suggests

Consuming a can a day of low- or no-sugar soft drink is associated with a much higher risk of having a stroke or developing dementia, researchers claim.


Their findings have prompted renewed questions about whether drinks flavoured with artificial sweeteners can increase the risk of serious illness, as heavily sugared drinks have already been shown to do.

“Drinking at least one artificially sweetened beverage daily was associated with almost three times the risk of developing stroke or dementia compared to those who drank artificially sweetened beverages less than once a week,” according to the American researchers who carried out a study published in Stroke, the journal of the American Heart Association.

“After adjustments for age, sex, education (for analysis of dementia), calorific intake, diet quality, physical activity and smoking, higher recent and higher cumulative intake of artificially sweetened soft drinks were associated with an increased risk of ischaemic stroke, all-cause dementia and Alzheimer’s disease dementia,” the co-authors write.

Those consuming at least a can of so-called diet drinks every day were 2.96 times more likely to suffer an ischaemic stroke and 2.89 times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than those who drank them less than once a week, they found.

Ischaemic strokes occur when blood cannot get to the brain because of a blockage, often one caused by a blood clot forming in either an artery leading to the brain or inside a vein in the brain itself. They comprise the large majority of the 152,0000 strokes a year which occur.

Surprisingly, though, the research also contradicted previous studies by finding that sugared drinks did not raise the risk of either serious outcome. It is based on data for more than 4,300 participants in the Framingham Heart Study, a long-term medical research project in the United States.

“To our knowledge, our study is the first to report an association between daily intake of artificially sweetened soft drink and increased risk of both all-cause dementia and dementia because of Alzheimer’s disease,” the co-authors added.

However, they admitted that they could not prove a causal link between intake of diet drinks and development of either medical condition because their study was merely observational and based on details people provided in questionnaires logging their food and drink habits.

Matthew Pase, a senior fellow in the department of neurology at Boston University’s school of medicine who was one of the co-authors, said that despite no evidence of a causal link, the apparent connection between sweetened drinks and the two conditions “does identify an intriguing trend that will need to be explored in other studies”.

This is not the first time that sweetened drinks have been implicated in the development of serious ill-health. The paper quotes the Northern Manhattan study as having found that “daily consumption of artificially sweetened soft drink was associated with a higher risk of combined vascular events but not stroke”. It also cites the conclusion of the Nurses Health study and Health Professionals follow-up study that “greater consumption of sugar and artificially sweetened soft drinks was each independently associated with a higher risk of incident stroke over 28 years of follow-up for women and 22 years of follow-up for men”.

Sales of diet versions of soft drinks have boomed in recent years as sales of fully sugared ones have declined sharply.

Defra’s Family Food Survey, published last month, found that sales of regular soft drinks fell by 34.6% between 2010 and 2014, while low-calorie drinks purchases increased by 35.8%. Now just 38% of all soft drinks consumed are fully sugared, it said.

However, experts and health charities warned against reading too much into the findings reported in Stroke.

“This research does not show that artificially sweetened drinks cause dementia. But it does highlight a worrying association that requires further investigation,” said Dr James Pickett, head of research at Alzheimer’s Society.

Naveed Sattar, professor of metabolic medicine at Glasgow University, said: “This is an interesting paper, but I would strongly caution against the conclusion that artificially sweetened drinks may increase the risk of stroke and Alzheimer’s. There is little other strong evidence to support a link between artificially sweetened drinks and adverse health outcomes.”

The results could have been skewed by people who had already become ill before switching to low- or no-sugar drinks, Sattar added.

Dr Mary Hannon-Fletcher, head of health sciences at Ulster University, said: “These data are sound as far as they go. However, it is important to note ‘the associations between recent and higher cumulative intake of artificially sweetened soft drinks and dementia were no longer significant after additional adjustment for vascular risk factors and diabetes mellitus’ – as the editor also pointed out. So are the conclusions sound? Perhaps not.”

Gavin Partington, director general of the British Soft Drinks Association, said: “Despite their claims, the authors of this observational study admit they found no cause and effect and provide no science-based evidence whatsoever to support their theories.

“In fact, based on the evidence, Public Health England is actively encouraging food and drink companies to use low-calorie sweeteners as an alternative to sugar and help people manage their weight.”

However, Tam Fry, a spokesman for the National Obesity Forum, warned consumers not to see low- or no-sugar drinks as healthy. “Don’t be fooled by the use of the word diet. Diet drinks were dreamed up as a description by an industry wanting to lull you into believing that it was a healthy thirst-quencher. Whether you’re thin or fat and thirsty, and not near a good old-fashioned tap, buy yourself bottled water,” Fry said.

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeand...nks-study-finds


Quote:
Diet fizzy drinks linked to dementia and stroke

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...ementia-stroke/
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  #2   ^
Old Fri, Apr-21-17, 03:10
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gonwtwindo gonwtwindo is offline
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I don't use artificial sweeteners any longer, but I wonder if the findings could be because most all AS users are overweight? Or battling to not regain a weight loss?
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  #3   ^
Old Fri, Apr-21-17, 04:52
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JEY100 JEY100 is online now
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Same thought here.

Amy Berger's great book, The Alzheimer's Antidote is now out in paperback, so I am re-reading it much more carefully than the E-book. All the links in Alzheimer's to a diet of sugar and refined carbs are scary, so makes sense that that those who have a danish for breakfast and a Diet Coke with burger and fries at lunch would show up associated with the disease.

If you want a detailed look at the latest research into Alzheimer's with the biochemistry explained as simply as possible (it is unavoidably technical in places) check out Amy's book. She has a good summary article of the information written for Weston Price magazine here:
http://www.tuitnutrition.com/p/alzheimers_13.html
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  #4   ^
Old Fri, Apr-21-17, 09:43
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bluesinger bluesinger is offline
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W-a-a-a-a-y back in time (the 70s), the sugar industry got really scared of AS. As industries do, they paid for studies and got the results they wanted. If rats consumed the equivalent of a trainload of saccharine, the rats developed cancer. As a result, it was proposed that we no longer be allowed to use it.

I wrote a letter to President Jimmy Carter begging to be allowed to have AS. The only time I ever wrote any President. If cigarettes were still on sale with only a warning on the packaging, AS could do the same.

I still use AS every day. I'm 72 and healthy.

On a side note, the Sugar Lobby was successful in having cyclamates banned in the USA. We're one of only a few countries where they are illegal. Cyclamates have no aftertaste and are relatively inexpensive. I buy mine from Global Drugs in Canada.
Quote:
Because the findings in rats suggested that cyclamate might increase the risk of bladder cancer in humans, the FDA banned the use of cyclamate in 1969. After reexamination of cyclamate’s carcinogenicity and the evaluation of additional data, scientists concluded that cyclamate was not a carcinogen or a co-carcinogen (a substance that enhances the effect of a cancer-causing substance). A food additive petition was filed with the FDA for the reapproval of cyclamate, but this petition is currently being held in abeyance (not actively being considered). The FDA’s concerns about cyclamate are not cancer related.
I always take dog-whistle studies with a grain of salt.
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  #5   ^
Old Fri, Apr-21-17, 09:44
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Similar thoughts here on the vagaries of a correlated assumption. There are too many other variables involved to project to any real conclusion here.

I'm also reading Amy's book, and it is an extremely well-written treatment of all things Alzheimer's. I highly recommend it, as it is instructive about how dietary tactics can be far superior to pharmaceutical tactics. One of the themes is that prevention is best approached in a proactive way well before symptoms appear. We can apply this theme to many things related to metabolic health.

I always thought Amy had a book in her, now I know she's destined for more. Very enjoyable.
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  #6   ^
Old Fri, Apr-21-17, 13:30
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Squarecube Squarecube is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesinger
W-a-a-a-a-y back in time (the 70s), the sugar industry got really scared of AS. As industries do, they paid for studies and got the results they wanted. If rats consumed the equivalent of a trainload of saccharine, the rats developed cancer. As a result, it was proposed that we no longer be allowed to use it.

I wrote a letter to President Jimmy Carter


Jeeze, your post got me thinking as your posts usually do. I remember those days very well! My mum made the big switch to no sugar Kool Aid , cuz it was better for us, but then suddenly we were all gonna die. It made such an impression that I was stunned to learn (most likely from this list) that cyclamates are still available from Canada.

Another thought. We boomers like to talk (ok brag) about how soda was used as a treat during our childhood, but do you remember making Kool Aid with your own sugar? It was one big heap of sugar! Maybe we weren't so superior after all, ur um, well at least we had superior metal ice cub trays with their lovely cubes.
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  #7   ^
Old Fri, Apr-21-17, 15:33
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bluesinger bluesinger is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squarecube
We boomers like to talk (ok brag) about how soda was used as a treat during our childhood, but do you remember making Kool Aid with your own sugar? It was one big heap of sugar! Maybe we weren't so superior after all, ur um, well at least we had superior metal ice cub trays with their lovely cubes.
You're so funny! Sometimes I feel like one of those idiots who talk about having to walk to school through 5 miles of snow. But I guess that was our mothers' generation.

Things were so different when we were young. Almost like another planet. Daddy was the breadwinner, working two jobs, and our food budget for 5 was $20 per week. Mother used coupons and only shopped weekly newspaper specials. We ate very simply, but there was always a gallon Tupperware jug of homemade sweet tea in the fridge. It was syrupy, but the ONLY thing other than water we could touch between meals. We rarely had sweets, but we always had that iced tea. I remember making Kool Aid, but it was too expensive for us to have often. And I hated those ice cube trays, but it was all we had, right?

Do you remember what year it was that the price of sugar went sky high? I'm a veteran googler and I can't find it. I assumed it had something to do with the rise of popularity of AS.
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  #8   ^
Old Sat, Apr-22-17, 04:10
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesinger
Do you remember what year it was that the price of sugar went sky high? I'm a veteran googler and I can't find it. I assumed it had something to do with the rise of popularity of AS.


As I recall it was '73 or '74? Judging from my age at the time.
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  #9   ^
Old Sat, Apr-22-17, 04:44
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cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Growing up, the only time we had soda in the house was during the years when cyclamates were used. When they were banned soda disappeared from the house. No sugary drinks for us. It's the only diet drink I ever liked. I've always hated the taste of other diet sodas. I also like metal ice trays. They work so much better than the plastic ones.

Jean
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  #10   ^
Old Sat, Apr-22-17, 14:22
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bluesinger bluesinger is offline
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I just read this, mentioning “We will look at genetic, dietary and environmental influences that could confer protection for neurons against Alzheimer’s pathology.”
Some Alzheimer's patients don't have symptoms.

I was wondering if we have anybody on the forum in their 90s. Also wondering how to get LCers into the study. It could be that eating LC is actually protective of the brain.
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  #11   ^
Old Sat, Apr-22-17, 16:28
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cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Glenda - Are you familiar with this book about Alzheimers and low carb eating by Amy Berger?

https://www.amazon.com/Alzheimers-A...ords=amy+berger

I haven't read it yet but I have read her original book which was only available as an ebook. This is apparently an updated version. Amy Berger occasionally shows up on this forum. Her website is:

http://www.tuitnutrition.com/

Jean
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  #12   ^
Old Sat, Apr-22-17, 18:18
bluesinger's Avatar
bluesinger bluesinger is offline
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Thanks, Jean. I'm going to research the book. I've been to the website before, but it was some time ago.

I don't know about the rest of you, but I'm terrified of AD. Both my parents had hypertension, strokes and heart disease, but they don't scare me. My father died of dementia. I don't want that to be me, and if there's anything within my power to do to stave it off, I'll do it.

Today after my post, I went back (yes, I've been there lots of times) to look for AD trials. Today I found one online. I fall within the wide parameters. I signed up for it, they will send me a swab kit and test me for the APOE4 gene. The results stay in their database and when a trial comes up which matches my gene profile, they'll let me know. They don't let me know the results of my test. It will always be my decision whether or not to participate in a trial, but I want to help, and if I have the gene, do what I can for my future health.

If interested: https://trialmatch.alz.org/find-clinical-trials
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  #13   ^
Old Sat, Apr-22-17, 18:20
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesinger
You're so funny! Sometimes I feel like one of those idiots who talk about having to walk to school through 5 miles of snow. But I guess that was our mothers' generation.


In my case it was 5 miles in the pouring rain - we were in Oregon.

We drank Kool-Aid, adding our own sugar, or Portland Punch (a local version of Hawaiian Punch), adding our own water. Later mom started buying generic cans of soda because when we worked in the strawberry fields in the summer, the cans could be partially frozen & it kept our lunches cool. But we only got one & never during the school year. Until I got into high school & rebelled; I remember spending my allowance on cherry cokes from the Dairy Queen across the street & Cheetos from the school vending machines. My first year in H.S. my fingers were constantly orange.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesinger
Do you remember what year it was that the price of sugar went sky high? I'm a veteran googler and I can't find it. I assumed it had something to do with the rise of popularity of AS.


I, too, recall it as being in the early '70s. I was still fairly new at doing my own shopping & remember the signs.
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  #14   ^
Old Sun, Apr-23-17, 03:18
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Demi Demi is offline
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Should link between dementia and artificial sweeteners be taken with a pinch of salt?

How people’s capacity for forgetfulness and lies may have impacted on research tying stroke and dementia to diet drinks


https://www.theguardian.com/society...weeteners-study
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  #15   ^
Old Sun, Apr-23-17, 03:51
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
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Glenda, I'm re-reading Amy Berger's book now, and there is a short chapter in it on the ApoE4 gene, which comes down to what you hear about most genes (at least in the LC world). The gene will load the gun, but diet and lifestyle pulls the trigger. Much of her book is about the diet needed so that trigger is never pulled ..the LC one you certainly are following.
Quote:
It should be noted that E4 is not an inherently damaging allele; it is only deleterious in combination with a HC (high carb) diet ( which is deleterious on its own) - Samuel Henderson

And thanks for that trial match website..interesting.

She does list some nutritional supplements but the basics for prevention are diet, exercise, sleep and reduced stress.

She takes a middle of the road approach on AS, use as little as possible, try to wean off them because they can still spike insulin and prompt the need for sweets, prefers stevia and some of sugar alcohols, but does not out-right eliminate them from her diet guidelines.

Last edited by JEY100 : Sun, Apr-23-17 at 03:59.
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