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  #1   ^
Old Mon, Mar-20-17, 12:28
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
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Default Keto for mental illness review

Quote:
The Current Status of the Ketogenic Diet in Psychiatry

imageEmmanuelle C. S. Bostock1*, imageKenneth C. Kirkby2 and imageBruce V. M. Taylor3
1Psychology, School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia
2Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia
3Menzies Institute for Medical Research, Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia
Background: The ketogenic diet (KD) has been used in treatment-resistant epilepsy since the 1920s. It has been researched in a variety of neurological conditions in both animal models and human trials. The aim of this review is to clarify the potential role of KD in psychiatry.

Methods: Narrative review of electronic databases PubMED, PsychINFO, and Scopus.

Results: The search yielded 15 studies that related the use of KD in mental disorders including anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). These studies comprised nine animal models, four case studies, and two open-label studies in humans. In anxiety, exogenous ketone supplementation reduced anxiety-related behaviors in a rat model. In depression, KD significantly reduced depression-like behaviors in rat and mice models in two controlled studies. In bipolar disorder, one case study reported a reduction in symptomatology, while a second case study reported no improvement. In schizophrenia, an open-label study in female patients (n = 10) reported reduced symptoms after 2 weeks of KD, a single case study reported no improvement. In a brief report, 3 weeks of KD in a mouse model normalized pathological behaviors. In ASD, an open-label study in children (n = 30) reported no significant improvement; one case study reported a pronounced and sustained response to KD. In ASD, in four controlled animal studies, KD significantly reduced ASD-related behaviors in mice and rats. In ADHD, in one controlled trial of KD in dogs with comorbid epilepsy, both conditions significantly improved.

Conclusion: Despite its long history in neurology, the role of KD in mental disorders is unclear. Half of the published studies are based on animal models of mental disorders with limited generalizability to the analog conditions in humans. The review lists some major limitations including the lack of measuring ketone levels in four studies and the issue of compliance to the rigid diet in humans. Currently, there is insufficient evidence for the use of KD in mental disorders, and it is not a recommended treatment option. Future research should include long-term, prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover dietary trials to examine the effect of KD in various mental disorders.



http://journal.frontiersin.org/arti...2017.00043/full

I sort of have to wonder what a dog that doesn't have ADHD is like? They seem to come in two flavours, ADHD and OLD.

For me--I think I get some mental health benefits just doing Atkins or Protein Power, vs. SAD, but the benefits became more obvious when I went to a more ketogenic diet.
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  #2   ^
Old Tue, Mar-21-17, 06:15
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/161/150 Female 67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
I sort of have to wonder what a dog that doesn't have ADHD is like? They seem to come in two flavours, ADHD and OLD.


LOL.

They seem to be complaining that the studies aren't very good; as though that is the same as keto not working.

I've read too many personal testimonies online that match my own experience: moods much better on low carb. People getting off their mood meds using low carb.

There's also the concept of "cerebral allergy." That a food won't break you out into hives, but instead triggers a spell of angry or depressed behavior. There's lots of parents who have seen their behavior-challenged kids greatly improved, even transformed, with whole food changes to their diets.
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  #3   ^
Old Tue, Mar-21-17, 07:53
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cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Plan: very low carb real food
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I have a lifelong history of major depression that was never helped by any pharmaceutical. Depression of any kind is no longer a problem for me and although I can't be sure it seems to me that eating very low carb high fat is what made the difference.

Jean
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  #4   ^
Old Tue, Mar-21-17, 08:05
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
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I do agree with them on a lot of things, though Actually tracking ketones in a study meant to look at the effect of a ketogenic diet on mental health seems like a no-brainer. But even there, if ketone levels didn't track with improvement, that wouldn't mean that the ketogenic ratio of the diet wasn't having an effect. Lowering protein in an Atkins type diet, as long as you don't raise the carbs, will make the diet more ketogenic, to a point--but ketosis isn't the only thing lowered protein will affect, amino acids and amino acid derivatives like seratonin, dopamine etc. obviously are big players in brain metabolism. I've found too much protein near bed can disrupt my sleep, where a more ketogenic diet improves my sleep--more REM sleep (or at least, more recalled dreams), and the ability to get back to sleep if I have to pee at 3 in the morning. That's been a problem for me since my early 20's, at least--not too long after my first recalled bipolar symptoms become obvious.
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  #5   ^
Old Tue, Mar-21-17, 12:03
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Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
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Plan: Paleo 99.5%
Stats: 210/170/160 Female 67.5"
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Quote:
I sort of have to wonder what a dog that doesn't have ADHD is like? They seem to come in two flavours, ADHD and OLD.

I've got a cat with extreme ADHD and another cat with surprisingly good ability to focus and concentrate (understand words, learn tricks, etc). Then there's a third cat kind of in the middle of those two.

But man, Marigold is ultra-flakey! I can't get her to focus on jumping on the bathroom counter to deliver her food to her. Her attention is everywhere. She starts to jump, then gets distracted. :-) Gah! So nowadays I wait for her to jump up and call to me.

Maybe when she's an old-lady cat she'll be less distracted.

Duncan gets into the zone and he will focus and concentrate really, really well on treats, clicker, whatever. Never saw a cat able to do that before him, but then again, I never tried.
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  #6   ^
Old Fri, Mar-24-17, 07:45
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/161/150 Female 67
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Progress: 84%
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I have heard from many people that my suggestion of a grain-free diet for their cats has calmed them down and eliminated stress behaviors.

And cats have no business being fed grains in the first place. No pioneer father came back to the cabin exclaiming, "That mountain lion has got into the wheat field again!"

But then, grains have no business being in our diets, either, judging from results. Lots of the benefits people talk about on the Wheatbellyblog are the improvement in their mental health, too.
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