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  #1   ^
Old Sat, Mar-11-17, 05:28
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Default Low gluten diets linked to higher risk of type 2 diabetes

Quote:
Eating more gluten may be associated with a lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology and Prevention / Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions.

Gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley, gives bread and other baked goods elasticity during the baking process and a chewy texture in finished products. A small percentage of the population cannot tolerate gluten due to Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, but gluten-free diets have become popular for people without these conditions, even though there is lack of evidence that reducing gluten consumption provides long-term health benefits.

"We wanted to determine if gluten consumption will affect health in people with no apparent medical reasons to avoid gluten," said Geng Zong, Ph.D., a research fellow in the Department of Nutrition at Harvard University's T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts. "Gluten-free foods often have less dietary fiber and other micronutrients, making them less nutritious and they also tend to cost more. People without Celiac disease may reconsider limiting their gluten intake for chronic disease prevention, especially for diabetes."

Micronutrients are dietary components such as vitamins and minerals.

In this long-term observational study, researchers found that most participants had gluten intake below 12 grams/day, and within this range, those who ate the most gluten had lower Type 2 diabetes risk during thirty years of follow-up. Study participants who ate less gluten also tended to eat less cereal fiber, a known protective factor for Type 2 diabetes development.

After further accounting for the potential effect of cereal fiber, individuals in the highest 20 percent of gluten consumption had a 13 percent lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in comparison to those with the lowest daily gluten consumption (approximately fewer than 4 grams).

The researchers estimated daily gluten intake for 199,794 participants in three long-term health studies -- 69,276 from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS), 88,610 from the Nurses' Health Study II (NHSII) and 41,908 from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) -- from food-frequency questionnaires completed by participants every two to four years. The average daily gluten intake in grams was 5.8 g/d for NHS, 6.8 g/d for NHSII, and 7.1 g/d for HPFS, and major dietary sources were pastas, cereals, pizza, muffins, pretzels, and bread.

Over the course of the study, which included 4.24 million person-years of follow-up from 1984-1990 to 2010-2013, 15,947 cases of Type 2 diabetes were confirmed.

Study participants reported their gluten consumption and the study was observational, therefore findings warrant confirmation by other investigations. Also, most of the participants took part in the study before gluten-free diets became popular, so there is no data from gluten abstainers.


I'm not sure a 13 percent difference even warrants further investigation, let alone warranting confirmation.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...70309120626.htm

Edited to add the source.

Last edited by teaser : Sat, Mar-11-17 at 08:10.
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  #2   ^
Old Sat, Mar-11-17, 06:39
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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They compared people who ate SAD with people who ate SAD using gluten-free products.

!!!!!!!

As Dr. Davis of Wheatbelly points out all the time, gluten free products ditch the wheat, but you still have the carbs from the cornstarch or tapioca or whatever they are using. And both have the same amounts of sugar.

It is trying to tell people gluten is a fad, I think.
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  #3   ^
Old Sat, Mar-11-17, 07:02
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Baylor1 Baylor1 is offline
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I would bet that people with gluten allergies when finding a gluten free products or a different grain they can use probably eat it in large quantites.
Just like LF people eat lots of junk.
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  #4   ^
Old Sat, Mar-11-17, 08:25
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teaser teaser is offline
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An example of just how unimpressive a 13 percent reduction in prevalence really is;

Quote:
Dietary fiber intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: a dose-response analysis of prospective studies.

Yao B1, Fang H, Xu W, Yan Y, Xu H, Liu Y, Mo M, Zhang H, Zhao Y.
Author information
Abstract
Observational studies suggest an association between dietary fiber intake and risk of type 2 diabetes, but the results are inconclusive. We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies evaluating the associations of dietary fiber intake and risk of type 2 diabetes. Relevant studies were identified by searching EMBASE (from 1974 to April 2013) and PubMed (from 1966 to April 2013). The fixed or random-effect model was selected based on the homogeneity test among studies. In addition, a 2-stage random-effects dose-response meta-analysis was performed. We identified 17 prospective cohort studies of dietary fiber intake and risk of type 2 diabetes involving 19,033 cases and 488,293 participants. The combined RR (95 % CI) of type 2 diabetes for intake of total dietary fiber, cereal fiber, fruit fiber and insoluble fiber was 0.81 (0.73-0.90), 0.77 (0.69-0.85), 0.94 (0.88-0.99) and 0.75 (0.63-0.89), respectively. A nonlinear relationship was found of total dietary fiber intake with risk of type 2 diabetes (P for nonlinearity < 0.01), and the RRs (95 % CI) of type 2 diabetes were 0.98 (0.90-1.06), 0.97 (0.87-1.07), 0.89 (0.80-0.99), 0.76 (0.65-0.88), and 0.66 (0.53-0.82) for 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 g/day. The departure from nonlinear relationship was not significant (P for nonlinearity = 0.72), and the risk of type 2 diabetes decreased by 6 % (RR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.93-0.96) for 2 g/day increment in cereal fiber intake. Findings from this meta-analysis indicate that the intakes of dietary fiber may be inversely associated with risk of type 2 diabetes.


According to this study, increasing total fiber from 30 grams per day to 35 grams per day decreased type 2 diabetes prevalence (they say risk, they should mean prevalence, risk implies cause) by 13 percent. Not a lot of plausibility here. A more likely explanation is that people generally more health conscious at the time tended to eat more fiber. Not everybody who eats high fiber is health conscious. Some of them might just really really like Taco Bell, maybe correcting for Taco Bell would have yielded even better results. They talk about dose response, but as dose goes up, percent of group that's health conscious could very easily go up, dose response doesn't really imply causation.
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  #5   ^
Old Sat, Mar-11-17, 14:22
Jesse LC Jesse LC is offline
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Looks like they want to save the base of the crumbling food pyramid.
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  #6   ^
Old Mon, Mar-13-17, 09:14
M Levac M Levac is offline
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Quote:
Gluten-free foods often have less dietary fiber and other micronutrients, making them less nutritious...

Dietary fiber is not a micronutrient. In fact, it provides exactly zero nutrition because we cannot digest it. In fact, that's the sole reason it's claimed to be beneficial.
Quote:
Micronutrients are dietary components such as vitamins and minerals.

And what kind of vitamin or mineral is dietary fiber, hm?
Quote:
thirty years of follow-up

Thirty years ago, I knew exactly nothing about diet or health, let alone gluten. I was 18, never heard of gluten or celiac or anything like that. I find it very unlikely that anybody else would have known anything about gluten back then either. A thirty-year follow-up of ignorance is meaningless.

If we want to hypothesize an alternative explanation, it's the gluten-free vs whole grains. There's tons more whole-anything than gluten-free crap. The idea of whole-anything being more healthy than refined is much much stronger and prevalent than any idea about gluten. Ergo, any effect can be explained by the tendency to adopt a multitude of genuinely better choices non-diet when choosing whole-anything in diet, vs when choosing gluten-free.

The 13 percent figure is relative, not absolute. The absolute figure is closer to 0.1%, a quantity that is easily explained by even the most benign mistake.
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  #7   ^
Old Mon, Mar-13-17, 10:13
Zei Zei is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baylor1
I would bet that people with gluten allergies when finding a gluten free products or a different grain they can use probably eat it in large quantites.
Just like LF people eat lots of junk.

Right. I've heard gluten-free carb foods (cookie/bread mixes, noodles etc.) are just as bad if not worse in terms of refined carbohydrate negative health effects (diabetes, etc.) as the refined wheat they replace. The key of course is to replace refined carbohydrates with whole real foods instead of just other highly refined stuff. For the person aware of the health detriment of too much carbohydrate such as readers here, that would likely mean replacing wheat with healthy fats/proteins/veggies, that sort of stuff, instead of just other non-gluten grains.
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  #8   ^
Old Mon, Mar-13-17, 10:38
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zei
Right. I've heard gluten-free carb foods (cookie/bread mixes, noodles etc.) are just as bad if not worse in terms of refined carbohydrate negative health effects (diabetes, etc.) as the refined wheat they replace.


Exactly. Following people online, they are either celiacs who are on a never ending quest to eat just like they used to, only gluten-free; or they are people who act like gluten-free is all you need to do.

When the truth is, it is part of a whole foods diet with carbohydrate restriction; that's the right combination.
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  #9   ^
Old Fri, Mar-24-17, 09:05
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Dr. Davis, of Wheatbellyblog, on this study:

http://www.wheatbellyblog.com/2017/...ines-get-wrong/
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  #10   ^
Old Fri, Mar-24-17, 09:17
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Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
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That's because for all it's faults, wheat has more protein and fewer carbs than the stuff they replace it with, like tapioca.
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  #11   ^
Old Fri, Mar-24-17, 09:41
raun01 raun01 is offline
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Is this true I am on Gluten free for a long time
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  #12   ^
Old Fri, Mar-24-17, 10:02
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teaser teaser is offline
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No, I don't think it's true. "Low" gluten intake was a bit under 4 grams. Google puts gluten in bread at 11-15 percent, so that's 44-66 grams of bread. Not low enough to spare people who are celiac or wheat sensitive. And there's not guarantee that what people ate instead of the wheat was any better for them than wheat. For instance--take somebody eating ten slices of wheat bread a day, and no sugar. Replace half the bread calories with sugar. Wheat went down, I'd say probability of diabetes went up.
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  #13   ^
Old Sat, Mar-25-17, 08:51
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Squarecube Squarecube is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
For instance--take somebody eating ten slices of wheat bread a day, and no sugar. Replace half the bread calories with sugar. Wheat went down, I'd say probability of diabetes went up.


I'm sorry to interrupt, but you just dragged a hidden memory from my brain. Is it possible as a child I actually buttered (most likely hydrogenated margarine) white bread and covered it with sugar.
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  #14   ^
Old Sat, Mar-25-17, 10:47
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doreen T doreen T is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squarecube
I'm sorry to interrupt, but you just dragged a hidden memory from my brain. Is it possible as a child I actually buttered (most likely hydrogenated margarine) white bread and covered it with sugar.

Oh, the memories!!

I remember as a child slathering hot toast (white bread, of course) with margarine, covering with brown sugar and cinnamon, then sprinkling hot black coffee to melt the sugar. I felt so sophisticated and grown up!

Thus began my later adult addiction to food-court cinnamon buns washed down with coffee in a paper cup!

Thankfully, that's all gone now


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