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  #1   ^
Old Fri, Jan-20-17, 06:11
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 89%
Location: Ontario
Default glucose vs. fructose

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...70119120447.htm

Quote:
The type of sugar you eat -- and not just calorie count -- may determine your risk for chronic disease. A new study is the first of its kind to compare the effects of two types of sugar on metabolic and vascular function. The paper is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology -- Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

Female rats were given a liquid solution of either glucose (a form of sugar found naturally in the body after carbohydrates are broken down) or fructose (sugar found in fruit and fruit juices) in addition to their normal diet of solid food. The rats received the sweetened solutions for eight weeks, roughly equivalent to a person eating large amounts of sugar for six years. The sugar-fed rats were compared with a control group that received plain drinking water in addition to their food supply.

Researchers found that although both sugar-fed groups consumed more calories than the control group, the total calorie intake of the glucose-fed rats was higher than the rats that were given fructose. Another surprising observation was that "despite this difference, only the fructose group exhibited a significant increase in final body weight," wrote the research team.

In addition to higher weight gain, the fructose group showed more markers of vascular disease and liver damage than the glucose group. These included high triglycerides, increased liver weight, decreased fat burning in the liver (a factor that can contribute to fatty liver) and impaired relaxation of the aorta, which can affect blood pressure.

These findings suggest that an increase in the amount of calories consumed due to sweeteners is not the only factor involved in long-term health risks. The type of sugar may also play a role in increasing risk factors for heart disease, diabetes and other chronic diseases.



You might think from this part

Quote:
Another surprising observation was that "despite this difference, only the fructose group exhibited a significant increase in final body weight," wrote the research team.


that the animals got fatter, but this wasn't really the case. Bigger isn't always fatter.

From the study itself;

Quote:
Despite this difference, only the fructose group
exhibited a significant increase in final body weight (by 1.1-fold). Due to the increase in
body weight, organ weights were normalized to femur length, which was not altered by
sugar supplementation. Liver weight was increased only by fructose supplementation
(by 1.4-fold vs control, and 1.3-fold vs glucose-fed rats), whereas adipose tissue weight
was significantly increased in both sugar-supplemented groups (by 5.6-fold in the
glucose group and 5.2-fold in the fructose group).


Not fatter, just sicker. Dropping fructose is a good idea--but if the solution is coca cola made with glucose instead of fructose, we might just get healthier people, but not necessarily leaner.

http://ajpheart.physiology.org/cont...9.2016.full.pdf
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  #2   ^
Old Sat, Jan-21-17, 07:39
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 9,538
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/169/150 Female 67
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Progress: 73%
Location: USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
Not fatter, just sicker. Dropping fructose is a good idea--but if the solution is coca cola made with glucose instead of fructose, we might just get healthier people, but not necessarily leaner.


It might be better, but still not healthy: now that we know fat doesn't just hang there, exiling your favorite pants; it's also messing with your endocrine profile.
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  #3   ^
Old Sat, Jan-21-17, 09:06
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 89%
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Default

There's also the question of how long it would remain healthier. With fructose, fatty liver etc. might start a little sooner, but with glucose, eventually you might still come up against your personal ability to store fat subcutaneously and start accumulating it in the wrong places as well.
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  #4   ^
Old Mon, Jan-23-17, 08:58
Groggy60's Avatar
Groggy60 Groggy60 is offline
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Plan: IF/Low carb
Stats: 219/201/172 Male 70 inches
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Location: Ottawa, ON
Default

Perhaps, sweeting with fructose should be banned. Fructose based sweetener use rose right along side the obesity epidemic, another villain along side vegetable oil we cannot get rid of.
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  #5   ^
Old Tue, Jan-24-17, 10:09
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/169/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 73%
Location: USA
Default

To add an additional wrinkle, I've been very satisfied with my Greek yogurt with berries. It satisfies me without making me hungry, my own method of determining if a meal is working for, or against, me.

However, it contains fructose and lactose. Is this a case of "dose makes the poison?" And they are naturally occurring, so I am getting them in a way my body can handle, not in a processed, enhanced, way?
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  #6   ^
Old Tue, Jan-24-17, 13:33
deirdra's Avatar
deirdra deirdra is offline
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Plan: HF/vLC/GF,CF,SF
Stats: 197/136/150 Female 66 inches
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Default

I cannot handle greek yogurt, but I think it is the dairy proteins, not the amount of fructose & lactose that makes me want to eat the whole tub. I can handle a few berries with no problems.
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  #7   ^
Old Tue, Jan-24-17, 15:53
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
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Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

The jury is still debating the impact of greek yogurt for me. While I find it satiating with a creamy effect, I'm in the process of determining how dairy in general impacts me, and that includes greek yogurt. I can limit myself with this delicious tasting medium upon which I add berries (usually blue) and nuts (usually hazelnuts or walnuts), but I also could gorge myself because the combination has the potential to encourage me to make exceptions regarding quantity. Bottom line, I have had some positive developments lately due to eliminating dairy for a period of time. More N=1 experiences are required. How fructose and lactose factors into that remains to be tested.
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  #8   ^
Old Tue, Jan-24-17, 16:32
inflammabl's Avatar
inflammabl inflammabl is offline
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Posts: 1,657
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 296/220/205 Male 71 inches
BF:25%?
Progress: 84%
Location: Upstate South Carolina
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by teaser
the total calorie intake of the glucose-fed rats was higher than the rats that were given fructose. Another surprising observation was that "despite this difference, only the fructose group exhibited a significant increase in final body weight,"


Interesting. So the glucosie rats had their metabolisms increase a lot while the fructosie rats put more of their calories into fat, bad fat at that.

How sweet is glucose? Potatoes don't taste that sweet to me.
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  #9   ^
Old Tue, Jan-24-17, 16:34
inflammabl's Avatar
inflammabl inflammabl is offline
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Posts: 1,657
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 296/220/205 Male 71 inches
BF:25%?
Progress: 84%
Location: Upstate South Carolina
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
More N=1 experiences are required. How fructose and lactose factors into that remains to be tested.

You're more than welcome to come eat all (and I mean all) the Oikos Triple Zero Greek Yogurt my wife keeps in our fridge.
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  #10   ^
Old Tue, Jan-24-17, 16:37
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/169/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 73%
Location: USA
Default

So many people have trouble with dairy I used to edge away and then find myself craving ice cream. So I am currently making it part of my meal plans and it works for me.

I was misdiagnosed as lactose intolerant and went without dairy for years until Atkins. Then I tried cheese and it was fine. I now think it was the crackers, not the cheese; the cereal, not the milk. Because I am happily gluten free.

My bottom line for any food is: does it make me hungry? If so, it's not food 😀
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  #11   ^
Old Tue, Jan-24-17, 20:56
Zei Zei is offline
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Posts: 1,164
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
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Location: Texas
Default

On the dairy subject, another thing to look into is the A1 versus A2 casein milk proteins, which is something I'm N=1-ing right now. Some people with dairy challenges might possibly find this issue involved if it's the protein rather than lactose giving them trouble. Basic idea is some cows spontaneously developed a mutation thousands of years or so back so they make a type of milk casein protein A1 instead of A2 like some other cattle breeds and all sheep, goats etc. still produce. The big Holstein/black-and-white type cows tend to be the ones making A1, which is where most milk in America and a lot of other places comes from because these big gals make a lot of milk on the cheap. Specialty A2 milk from genetically tested cattle is out there, but I've just been shopping at regular grocery stores for goat milk/cheese, sheep cheese and and cow cheese imports from southern Europe where A2 breeds are still popular for their traditional cheeses. Then I'll go back to A1 dairy and see what happens.
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  #12   ^
Old Tue, Jan-24-17, 21:04
mike_d's Avatar
mike_d mike_d is offline
Grease is the word!
Posts: 7,911
 
Plan: PSMF/IF
Stats: 236/180/175 Male 72 inches
BF:disappearing!
Progress: 92%
Location: Alamo city, Texas
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WereBear
I am happily gluten free.

My bottom line for any food is: does it make me hungry? If so, it's not food 😀
Never thought of that, but it seems to be a good rule of thumb. Some days I am just more hungry no matter what I eat, so I may need to take a closer look at what might cause that. Dairy, like cream or cheese is hard to give up entirely

I think the biggest culprit is lack of quality protein. Beef Jerky, even though fairly low fat, seems to sustain very well. It's also spicy and quite salty too, and it requires a lot to chew. Bacon, of course, is another.
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  #13   ^
Old Wed, Jan-25-17, 04:31
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
Posts: 9,538
 
Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
Stats: 220/169/150 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 73%
Location: USA
Default

I've heard about the A1/A2 thing. There were stretches where I just did goat cheese. Made no diff to me, but it could be a way of having cheese for some people.

Last edited by WereBear : Wed, Jan-25-17 at 05:40.
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  #14   ^
Old Wed, Jan-25-17, 11:38
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 1,451
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by inflammabl
You're more than welcome to come eat all (and I mean all) the Oikos Triple Zero Greek Yogurt my wife keeps in our fridge.

Thanks for the offer. Is "Triple Zero Greek Yogurt" related to fat content, or zero fat? Never touch the stuff without fat, and my current N=1 is a 90 day dairy elimination to see how I react. Early indications are I'm better off staying away from dairy. Sounds like you have enough yogurt in your fridge to feed a posse.
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  #15   ^
Old Wed, Jan-25-17, 12:23
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is offline
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Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 89%
Location: Ontario
Default

Three times as much not fat?
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