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  #1   ^
Old Sat, Nov-21-15, 05:32
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Default BBC's "Doctor in the House"

The BBC aired a program where a family practice doctor advised patients with diabetes to remove sugar, wheat and dairy products, get all of their "five a day" from vegetables not fruit, and restrict eating to a ten hour window.

Cannot see the entire program in the US, but these two clips posted on DietDoctor from a BBC morning show discussing it and the kitchen clean-out clip give a good preview of his advice.

Dr. Rangan Chatterjee Shakes Up Type 2 Diabetes Treatment On Breakfast TV

http://www.dietdoctor.com/dr-rangan...on-breakfast-tv

http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/pr...or-in-the-house


Oh, the horrors of it. British Dieticians organization has already released a statement that they are alarmed by his controversial and potentially dangerous advice, etc, etc. Although he is a Doctor!! ...only a dietician!! Is qualified to give advice and that doctor's dangerous advice like eating more vegetables and less pasta and rice might threaten lives.

https://www.bda.uk.com/news/view?id...%5D=news%2Flist


Quote:

BDA alarmed by controversial and potentially dangerous advice in BBC’s ‘Doctor in the House’

On 19 November 2015, BBC aired the first episode of their new series, Doctor in the House. The British Dietetic Association were alarmed by some of the advice provided by the doctor to the family featured. In the episode, all sources of carbohydrates for the person with diabetes were removed with emphasis placed on removing dairy and wheat containing foods. This along with suggesting that the 5-a-Day for the individual came from vegetables only, avoiding fruit completely, whilst also promoting time-restricted eating / fasting.


“This advice is potentially dangerous with possible adverse side effects. Not only is there limited evidence around carbohydrate elimination and time-restricted eating for those with diabetes, but cutting out food groups and fasting could lead to nutrition problems including nutrient deficiencies and adversely affect their blood sugar control, particularly in individuals taking certain medications or insulin,” said Dr Duane Mellor PhD and registered dietitian.

“Whilst reducing refined carbohydrates and sugar intake is definitely a positive, many of the other recommendations lack evidence from scientific research base. People living with diabetes watching the programme are advised to stick with their current treatment and discuss any changes with their diabetes team, which can include a consultant or GP, dietitian and Diabetes Nurse.”

According to Diabetes UK guidelines, everyone with diabetes should receive individual and ongoing dietary and nutrition advice from a dietitian. The television show did not appear to use a dietitian to assist with the dietary advice, and whilst doctors are highly qualified professionals, dietitians are the only qualified health professionals that specifically assess, diagnose and treat diet and nutrition problems at an individual and wider public health level.

Uniquely, dietitians use the most up-to-date public health and scientific research on food, health and disease, which they translate into practical guidance to enable people to make appropriate lifestyle and food choices. For more credible dietary guidance for diabetics, please visit the BDA’s FREE resource, Food Fact Sheets. There is a Fact sheet specifically for Diabetes Type 1 as well as Diabetes Type 2.

Last edited by JEY100 : Sat, Nov-21-15 at 13:50.
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  #2   ^
Old Sat, Nov-21-15, 05:56
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cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Plan: very low carb real food
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Default

There's a through the looking glass feel to this kind of bad advice from the BDA but it is also very very sad for the people who rely on them for their information. The most up to date information on "food, health and disease" comes from Dr Westman, Dr Halberg, Dr Bernstein and sites like diet doctor.com and others

Jean
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  #3   ^
Old Sat, Nov-21-15, 08:02
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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The horror!

I wish I knew why some people are so resistant to changing their minds. It's not even their own advice they've been pushing! They can say they were bamboozled along with everyone else!
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  #4   ^
Old Sat, Nov-21-15, 09:44
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teaser teaser is offline
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Quote:
“This advice is potentially dangerous with possible adverse side effects. Not only is there limited evidence around carbohydrate elimination and time-restricted eating for those with diabetes, but cutting out food groups and fasting could lead to nutrition problems including nutrient deficiencies and adversely affect their blood sugar control, particularly in individuals taking certain medications or insulin,” said Dr Duane Mellor PhD and registered dietitian.


Yes. Instead of using a dietary approach for which there is limited evidence, let's stick to a diet for which there is no evidence. "Adversely affect their blood sugar control, especially if taking medications, insulin,''--the approach certainly could do this, if patients didn't work with their doctors to lower these, as needed.

In retrospect, making one group responsible for administering insulin and medication, and another responsible for advising the diet, the main factor involved in just how much of that insulin/medicine is needed, might not be the best way to arrange things.
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  #5   ^
Old Sat, Nov-21-15, 10:36
M Levac M Levac is offline
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Default

I checked their Food Fact Sheets. It ain't about food, it ain't facts, but it is certainly just a sheet. There's even a notice at the bottom of the document:
Quote:
This Food Factsheet is a public service of The British Dietetic Association (BDA) intended for information only. It is not a substitute for proper medical diagnosis or dietary advice given by a dietitian. If you need to see a dietitian, visit your GP for a referral or: www.freelancedietitians.org for a private dietitian. To check your dietitian is registered check www.hcpc-uk.org This Food Fact Sheet and others are available to download free of charge at www.bda.uk.com/foodfacts

Written by Elaine Hibbert Jones, Dietitian on behalf of the BDA Specialist Group Dietitians Management Education Group (DMEG) and Gill Regan on behalf of the DMEG paeds sub-group. The information sources used to develop this fact sheet are available at www.bda.uk.com/foodfacts © BDA July 2014. Review date July 2017. Version 7

Here's the hilarious bit, also found at the address above:
Quote:
The Fact Sheets are for information only: they are not a substitute for proper medical diagnosis or dietary advice given by a dietitian.

That's what's called a "disclaimer". Normally, a disclaimer is intended to warn the reader. However in this particular case, it actually reinforces the thing said which this disclaimer is intended to warn about. The thing said was said by a dietician (Written by Elaine Hibbert Jones, Dietician), and the disclaimer warns that the reader should rely on a dietician (not a substitute for...dietary advice given by a dietician). See? It's not a genuine disclaimer.

Here's an even more hilarious bit, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disclaimer
Quote:
Under UK law, the validity of disclaimers is significantly limited by the Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977. By virtue of the Act, a business cannot use a contract term or a notice to exclude or restrict its liability for negligence causing death or personal injury. In the case of other loss or damage, a disclaimer will only be effective so long as it is reasonable in all the circumstances.

The BDA uses such a disclaimer, as I demonstrated above. But that doesn't stop the BDA from pointing out how dangerous the doctor's advice is.

It seems to me those dieticians are trying to usurp the doctor's role. After all, they are "alarmed" by what a doctor said/did, and point out just how wrong that doc is, all according to their own interpretation of what's wrong and what's right. Well, let us refer to that disclaimer and point out that everything that comes from the British Dietetic Association is "not a substitute for proper medical diagnosis".

Anybody in the UK wanna make a complaint about the BDA for their disclaimer?

Last edited by M Levac : Sat, Nov-21-15 at 10:42.
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  #6   ^
Old Sat, Nov-21-15, 10:56
M Levac M Levac is offline
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To illustrate the whole meaning and true purpose of a disclaimer in this context, I refer again to Wikipedia and their disclaimer about that: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikip...ical_disclaimer
In giant bold letters, we can read:
Quote:
WIKIPEDIA DOES NOT GIVE MEDICAL ADVICE

That disclaimer is absolutely unambiguous. We can be certain that there will be no misunderstanding of any kind whatsoever when we read Wikipedia for any information related to medicine. These guys aren't doctors, don't pretend to be, don't try to diminish doctors nor doctor's advice or profession, don't try to usurp a doctor's role in any way whatsoever, don't try to make themselves appear more than what they really are.

To illustrate even better, let's make it look exactly like the BDA disclaimer.
Quote:
Not a substitute for proper medical diagnosis, or general advice given by a Wikipedia contributor.

Do any of us think that this disclaimer would pass the test?
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  #7   ^
Old Sat, Nov-21-15, 11:07
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Jonathan Swift would have had a field day with this. I can only hope that this becomes a topic for John Oliver.
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  #8   ^
Old Sat, Nov-21-15, 11:54
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Nicekitty Nicekitty is offline
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Oh, this should really stir the pot and be fun! He is quite good-looking and charismatic. Goes a long way, as Cesar Milan has shown (unfortunately!). I'm interested in tracking down that first episode to see what he says about menopause.
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  #9   ^
Old Sat, Nov-21-15, 13:46
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Default

Dr Chatterjee's Facebook page. Apparently he came to the US for extra training in Functional Medicine, has support from Dr Mark Hyman, and has been on some of the Functional Medicine webinars/ forums.

https://www.facebook.com/DrChatterjee/

http://functionalforum.com/bbc-prim...r-in-the-house/

Sign up for his newsletter, and you get his Four Pillars of Good Health guidelines.

Quote:
These are the four pillars of good health that I discuss in this ebook:
1. Eat well 2. Move well 3. Sleep well 4. Relax well


Website well done: http://www.drchatterjee.co.uk

Last edited by JEY100 : Sat, Nov-21-15 at 14:02.
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  #10   ^
Old Sat, Nov-21-15, 16:06
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bkloots bkloots is offline
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Oh this is too much fun.

Quote:
This along with suggesting that the 5-a-Day for the individual came from vegetables only, avoiding fruit completely, whilst also promoting time-restricted eating / fasting.
My ten-hour "time restricted" eating window is from about seven in the morning to seven at night. Within that time, I can usually manage breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks as needed. The "fasting" part I mostly spend relaxing and sleeping. Very well, thank you.

Horrors!
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  #11   ^
Old Sun, Nov-22-15, 05:55
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
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Default

Watch the entire program here! Copied from BBC, hope it can remain so the world can see his "potentially dangerous advice"

http://youtu.be/3_EHf2Hao_g

A question on other discussions was did the doctor advise to remove all dairy...and yes, he did. At home and when going out to an Indian restaurant, he requested no cream, yogurt, etc. in the sauces.

Although it also covers sleep, exercise with a Fitbit to get in 10K steps, mediation, (and teachers, watch the part about kids germs ), the show often returns to the food or "Diet is the Key to Good Health" mantra which is brilliant.

The BDA mentions "time restricted eating" but I am surprised that they didn't also go nuts over the advice for the diabetic to fast 2-3 days a week for 24 hours. Specifically for diabetes, and under doctor supervision, but 24 hour dinner to dinner fast was recommended....and spoiler alert...the results for everyone were very good.

Last edited by JEY100 : Sun, Nov-22-15 at 08:23.
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  #12   ^
Old Sun, Nov-22-15, 16:37
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Merpig Merpig is offline
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Quote:
but cutting out food groups and fasting could lead to nutrition problems including nutrient deficiencies and adversely affect their blood sugar control, particularly in individuals taking certain medications or insulin,” said Dr Duane Mellor PhD and registered dietitian.
Oh yeah. it might actually make their blood sugar DROP, possibly even down into NORMAL range! Oh the horror of it! True if you are on insulin you need to monitor closely to avoid hypos - but keeping your BG numbers high so as not to affect your medical dose is what sounds like the "problem" to me!

Last edited by Merpig : Sun, Nov-22-15 at 20:33.
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  #13   ^
Old Sun, Nov-22-15, 18:19
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Kristine Kristine is offline
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Quote:
...but cutting out food groups and fasting could lead to nutrition problems including nutrient deficiencies and adversely affect their blood sugar control


First of all, since when is sweet fruit (ie excluding avocados, olives, tomatoes, peppers, etc) its own food group? I bet he'd applaud you if you went vegetarian, though...

Secondly, since when is only eating within a ten-hour window "fasting?!" Are we really this brainwashed into shoveling food in our faces from the time our feet hit the floor in the morning until right before we put on our PJs and go to bed?! All kinds of non-dieting people already eat that way. It used to be called "normal." Let's say you get up at 7:00 am and eat breakfast at 8:00. You have lunch, you may or may not snack during the day, and then you have dinner at 5:00, and that's it. Oh, but I bet that same expert would have no problem with it if you just called it "avoiding snacking after dinner."
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  #14   ^
Old Sun, Nov-22-15, 20:12
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Merpig
Oh yeah. it might actually make their blood sugar DROP, possibly even down into NORMAL range! Oh the horror of it! True if you are on insulin you need to monitor closely to avoid hypos - but keeping your BG numbers high so as not to affect your medical dose is what sounds like the "problem" to me!


As I understand it, a doctor can only be sued if your blood sugars go too low. High ones are considered normal for diabetics.

Honest.
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  #15   ^
Old Mon, Nov-23-15, 12:00
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NewRuth NewRuth is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kristine
Are we really this brainwashed into shoveling food in our faces from the time our feet hit the floor in the morning until right before we put on our PJs and go to bed?!

Yes, we are.

Doctors think that not snacking is starving yourself. My sister consulted with both a hepatologist and hematologist. Both of them expressed concern that she was starving herself by only eating twice a day with an afternoon snack if needed. She said that they each had an "Ohhh...yeah!" kind of reaction when she reminded them that protein and fat take longer to digest and without the blood sugar swings that eating carbs will give you, she felt fine all day. Both are prominent doctors at a prestigious medical center.

On the up side, the hepatologist responded very positively to her being grain free.
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