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  #46   ^
Old Mon, Mar-07-16, 10:23
CallmeAnn's Avatar
CallmeAnn CallmeAnn is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,629
 
Plan: HFLC/IF
Stats: 218/193.8/135 Female 5'4"
BF:?/44%?/?
Progress: 29%
Location: Houston area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MickiSue
Not only baked goods with preservatives in them.

With produce, it's the opposite. Buy lettuce, especially the bags of "baby" greens at the grocery store, and you'll be lucky if they are still edible when you get them home from the store. At multiple times between the field and your house, they were not refrigerated, and it was probably a long time between the field and the bag. Even worse, between the bag and the store. A couple weeks, at least, usually.

Pick baby greens in your own garden, or even a big pot on your deck, and they'll be in the frig, after a light rinse, within the hour.

They'll last for the two weeks it took the bagged stuff to get to your grocery store, and then some, because you have controlled the environment, the entire way.

Of course, as they taste 100X better than the grocery baby greens, they'll never need to last that 2 weeks.


I am not a gardener, and when I tried it, I failed miserably so I have a few questions. When I see the plants on the nursery shelves in the early spring or fall, they are never anything like leafy greens. Do they grow in hot climates? Where are you located? I am in Houston, TX. Other places get hot in the daytime but the climates that most challenge the more delicate plants (edible AND ornamental) remain hot at night. That's us.
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  #47   ^
Old Mon, Mar-07-16, 10:49
MickiSue MickiSue is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 8,006
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 189/148.6/145 Female 5' 5"
BF:36%/28%/25%
Progress: 92%
Location: Twin Cities, MN
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LOL, Ann, I'm in the Twin Cities: on the Mississippi in MN.

We're all dancing like crazy people today, because of the unheard of high of 65 that's predicted.

We get hot in summer, but even then, it tends to cool off at night, except for a few miserable nights.

Take a look, on the Seed Savers' Exchange website, at a lettuce called Rouge D'hiver. We planted it one year, along with the regular stuff, and as all the rest was coming up, it did not.

But, once the temps hit 80 or more, for several days, it started to sprout. I told myself, "D'UH!" The name means red of summer, in French. It's a warm weather lettuce, that may even work for your weather, at least your early spring.

Lettuce doesn't require much of a green thumb. It'll grow just fine in a pot, so long as it has good soil, and regular water.
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  #48   ^
Old Mon, Mar-07-16, 12:31
Verbena Verbena is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 695
 
Plan: My own
Stats: 186/158/150 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 78%
Location: SW PNW
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CallMeAnn - The trick with gardening in a hot place is to pay no attention (or little attention) to what the calendar says. Everyone "knows" that gardens are planted in the spring, and things grow in the summer. Where you are you might be better off planting in the fall. I live in the PNW, and have lived in N. California, so reading gardening books from New England can be frustrating - rainfall patterns are quite different. If you want to try your hand at gardening again find a book written for your general area to get some tips. I know they are out there, though can't remember any names right now. Another option, if you don't want a book, is to talk with the staff at a good local plant nursery (not the garden section of the local hardware store LOL). They usually are quite knowledgeable.
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  #49   ^
Old Mon, Mar-07-16, 13:12
jjcounts jjcounts is offline
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Posts: 4
 
Plan: Varietly
Stats: 190/150/125 Female 65 inches
BF:
Progress: 62%
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It's funny how people feel free to share their unsolicited opinions about personal choices such as diet! One night my mother-in-law commented on how unhealthy she though my diet was because of "all that fat". I was eating a small steak, sautéed veggies and a salad. Yes there was a fair amount of fat in the meal, but I had to chuckle, because she was eating a big plate of sugary sauced BBQ ribs with French fries. Not low fat OR low sugar. I've learned to not bother responding to ignorant comments like that, and I try to only share my knowledge about low carbing when someone is genuinely interested (as opposed to trying to criticize or start an argument).
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  #50   ^
Old Mon, Mar-07-16, 13:21
GreekRibs's Avatar
GreekRibs GreekRibs is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,637
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 188/139/138 Female 5'9"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Saskatchewan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjcounts
It's funny how people feel free to share their unsolicited opinions about personal choices such as diet! One night my mother-in-law commented on how unhealthy she though my diet was because of "all that fat". I was eating a small steak, sautéed veggies and a salad. Yes there was a fair amount of fat in the meal, but I had to chuckle, because she was eating a big plate of sugary sauced BBQ ribs with French fries. Not low fat OR low sugar. I've learned to not bother responding to ignorant comments like that, and I try to only share my knowledge about low carbing when someone is genuinely interested (as opposed to trying to criticize or start an argument).

So true jjcounts! It's usually people eating their faces off on terrible food that like to mock low-carb and make up stories about it. I've been lucky in that all my family and friends marvel at the low-carb results I've demonstrated and see the improvement in my mood. So they're all supportive. They're all healthy and slim so no wonder they don't mock it. On occasion people in denial about their own obesity have cut it down, but like you, I completely tune those folks out.
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  #51   ^
Old Mon, Mar-07-16, 13:54
pazia pazia is offline
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Posts: 374
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 00/00/00 Female 00
BF:
Progress:
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It's harder sometimes when people judge you just by your appearance. If you're still somewhat overweight (even if you've lost a lot doing LC), you're sort of "fair game" for people who either are thinner or think they don't have a weight problem themselves.

I'm not a poster-lady for perfect weight or health. But what they may not see is how much my strength, vitality, and productivity have increased since I adopted HFLC and lost many pounds (even if I'm still fat in some people's eyes). Not to mention mental clarity and alertness and the fact I rarely get colds.
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  #52   ^
Old Mon, Mar-07-16, 18:48
MickiSue MickiSue is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 8,006
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 189/148.6/145 Female 5' 5"
BF:36%/28%/25%
Progress: 92%
Location: Twin Cities, MN
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Pazia, what you eat wouldn't matter to people like that; they want to feel superior to somebody, and you're the one they picked.

When they have their strokes and heart attacks from the inflammation caused by all the carbs, and you have reached and are maintaining your goal, you can shake your head in pity.
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  #53   ^
Old Tue, Mar-08-16, 10:47
CallmeAnn's Avatar
CallmeAnn CallmeAnn is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,629
 
Plan: HFLC/IF
Stats: 218/193.8/135 Female 5'4"
BF:?/44%?/?
Progress: 29%
Location: Houston area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meme#1
Hahahaha you caught her! That is hilarious.
I had the same type of thing with a waitress not understanding, luckily she was fat too! I had her take away the complimentary plate of fried thingies and mentioned we were on a diet, but when the main food came I asked for butter for the veggies. She had a perplexed look on her face. when she came back with the butter I explained we were on low carb. She asked what's on it, I replied meat and veggies and butter. Her response was, not bread or potato, oh no I can't live without those. Well she was fater than me and also 25 years younger....I was Just thinking of what she'll be like when she reaches my age.


I was checking out at a small discount store last Friday and started talking to the lady ahead of me and the lady checking us out. The other customer was very heavy and the cashier was naturally thin. We talked about diet of course, and when I described my food, the cashier said, "Oh, I could never do that. I couldn't give up my pasta." I told her she could if she were diabetic and she agreed that would be different. So, I pointed out, if you can do it for that reason, then you can do it for weight loss. Both of them agreed and hopefully the seed was planted.
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  #54   ^
Old Tue, Mar-08-16, 10:55
CallmeAnn's Avatar
CallmeAnn CallmeAnn is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,629
 
Plan: HFLC/IF
Stats: 218/193.8/135 Female 5'4"
BF:?/44%?/?
Progress: 29%
Location: Houston area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin120
this thread is hilarious, but also heartbreaking- i want to kick in some teeth for you all!


2. my one and ONLY visit to a wafflehouse, the guy brought me what tasted like a regular soda. when i explained i'm diabetic, can he please bring me a new one just to be safe.....he came back several times giggling- "I just can't remember." After round 3 i lost my patience, and said how serious this was. My obviously stoned waiter said "please, you are not diabetic." I stood up, lifting my tank top to show him my insulin pump in my stomach, in the middle of the restaurant.
Never again, Awful House!


It's weird that you had such a rude server. I'd be surprised if he didn't lose his job. He at least would have been written up. Waffle House is an easy go-to for us. They'll hold the bread and offer tomato slices rather than hash browns or toast. I can understand, maybe, not going to that location but it's a great option for us.
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  #55   ^
Old Tue, Mar-08-16, 11:01
CallmeAnn's Avatar
CallmeAnn CallmeAnn is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,629
 
Plan: HFLC/IF
Stats: 218/193.8/135 Female 5'4"
BF:?/44%?/?
Progress: 29%
Location: Houston area
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Verbena
CallMeAnn - The trick with gardening in a hot place is to pay no attention (or little attention) to what the calendar says. Everyone "knows" that gardens are planted in the spring, and things grow in the summer. Where you are you might be better off planting in the fall. I live in the PNW, and have lived in N. California, so reading gardening books from New England can be frustrating - rainfall patterns are quite different. If you want to try your hand at gardening again find a book written for your general area to get some tips. I know they are out there, though can't remember any names right now. Another option, if you don't want a book, is to talk with the staff at a good local plant nursery (not the garden section of the local hardware store LOL). They usually are quite knowledgeable.


Thanks, both MickieSue and Verbena. After posting that I don't see lettuce among the baby plants, I of course saw some yesterday at HD. I'll check out a local book or two. I know they have them, too. One reason I was unsuccessful was probably the soil we used. It was a raised bed. The other reason was I tried not to use pesticides. That may not be a beginner's strategy.
As for gardening books written in other regions, the ones from California give us fits. "Plant in full sun" does not mean Houston's full sun. Even in the south of your state, the sun is not like here. I like gardenweb.com when I am in the mood to grow anything. You can get help from experienced gardeners in your zone, and they are knowledgeable about heat zones, which are a way better indicator than hardiness zones. Come to think of it, I'll likely go there and ask.
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  #56   ^
Old Tue, Mar-08-16, 12:05
Verbena Verbena is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 695
 
Plan: My own
Stats: 186/158/150 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 78%
Location: SW PNW
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"As for gardening books written in other regions, the ones from California give us fits. "Plant in full sun" does not mean Houston's full sun."
Not to turn this into a gardening thread, or anything like that, but the one I love was the herb gardening book, written by a New Englander, where the advice was to water the seedlings well when planting "and then let Nature do the watering". Yes, well, where I lived at the time (south SF Bay Area) we didn't get any rain to speak of from April to October, so that wasn't terribly useful advice for me. LOL
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  #57   ^
Old Tue, Mar-08-16, 12:36
Robin120's Avatar
Robin120 Robin120 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 3,925
 
Plan: low carb
Stats: 171/125/145 Female 5'9
BF:
Progress: 177%
Location: DC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CallmeAnn
It's weird that you had such a rude server. I'd be surprised if he didn't lose his job. He at least would have been written up. Waffle House is an easy go-to for us. They'll hold the bread and offer tomato slices rather than hash browns or toast. I can understand, maybe, not going to that location but it's a great option for us.


I should have said something to a manager, but i was so irritated, i just sulked and went hungry/thirsty while my (now) ex chowed down.....

But yeah, you would be amazed at how rude people are to thin people who are very conscious of what they eat. i have been accused many times of "not being diabetic", had many people all but roll their eyes at a request for a new drink if it doesn't taste right, and the looks my mom received for ordering me diet soda when i was a kid were obvious even to me!
On Valentine's this year i was at a very fancy place and ordered a glass of sparkling wine- a sparkling fruity pink juice and bubbly thing came out. when i explained that i ordered something else and asked to have it taken back, the waitress tried to convince me i would like it.....um, i ordered what i would like!

i think a lot of people just assume if you are asking about the ingredients or to have a substitution, etc....but you are thin- you are just being high maintenance and neurotic....because thin people clearly don't have true diet related health problems
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  #58   ^
Old Tue, Mar-08-16, 16:15
MickiSue MickiSue is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 8,006
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 189/148.6/145 Female 5' 5"
BF:36%/28%/25%
Progress: 92%
Location: Twin Cities, MN
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Right Robin. People have become used to diabetic being equal to overweight. Even though T1 diabetics are frequently thin, and being thin doesn't protect one from T2, either.

Re: lettuce. Seeds are less expensive, and lettuce grows quickly from seed.

Anything from HD is suspect to me: they buy bedding plants raised with neonicotinoids, and I won't have them in my flowers, much less my food!
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  #59   ^
Old Tue, Mar-08-16, 18:38
pazia pazia is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 374
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 00/00/00 Female 00
BF:
Progress:
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjcounts
It's funny how people feel free to share their unsolicited opinions about personal choices such as diet!


I know, right? Most people wouldn't confront someone and dictate how they should dress or wear makeup, but when it comes to how you choose to eat any buttinsky thinks they have a right to comment.

It's amazing how people don't even try to be tactful when it comes to how they think they're right and you're wrong in food choices.

And in a restaurant, where you have the right to be served what you order, I don't think you should have to justify it or give a reason about being diabetic, allergic, or anything else. I know restaurants may be on the defensive these days because people are more picky, but maybe then they shouldn't have so many things on the menu heavy on sugar, preservatives, etc.
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  #60   ^
Old Sat, Mar-19-16, 23:14
Grav Grav is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 476
 
Plan: Banting
Stats: 302/180/180 Male 175cm
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: New Zealand
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"No fruit at all? Cutting out an entire food group like that is dangerous!" - my Dad's current partner, who happens to be recovering from a heart attack.

Most people have been supportive though. Without necessarily meaning to, I seem to have inspired one or two others I know to re-evaluate their diet as well. These are people who have known me for most of my life, so they are recognising that if someone like me - who was forever resigned to always being fat - might one day no longer be fat, then it might be something worth looking at closely for themselves too.
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