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  #1   ^
Old Fri, Aug-29-14, 11:31
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 9,549
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
Default Walking vs Running

A thoughtful analysis by Dr John Brifffa. If you are currently overweight, a number of issues to consider before doing a "couch to 5K" type program.

http://www.drbriffa.com/2014/08/29/...versus-running/

Links to the study and editorial on Dr Briffa's blog.

Quote:
I recently read an interesting editorial in the Journal of American College of Cardiology about the relative benefits of walking and running [1]. The editorial is partly a comment on a paper published in the same edition of the journal which found that running for 5-10 minutes a day is associated with a 45 per cent reduced risk of dying from cardiovascular disease over a 15-year period. Overall mortality was also reduced (by 30 per cent).

This sort of ‘epidemiological’ evidence cannot tell us for sure that running is having benefits here (just that running is associated with the benefits found). However, the article also cites research showing that in individuals who have had a heart attack, those who take up exercise have better outcomes than those who don’t. The editorial goes on to compare the benefits associated with running with those associated with walking. Overall, it seems the benefits of a 5-minute run match those of a 15-minute walk. Also, broadly speaking, it seems the benefits associated with a 25-minute run are, overall, equivalent to walking for 1 hour 45 minutes. The authors make the point that if one is young and vibrant, running is more time-efficient.

This may be broadly so, but what I think the authors fail to factor is time spent around the time of exercise. Running will generally require individuals to get changed twice and shower once too. Plus, we may have time stretching (before and/or after exercise) and maybe even cooling down. A 5-minute run could, in reality, easily take half an hour out of one’s day (in other words, significantly more time than that devoted to say, a 15-minute walk (which, generally, will require no changing, stretching or showering). The authors do go on, though, to point out that running can have a ‘hefty cost’ to the body in terms of injury. The authors cite the fact that even experienced runners with good preparation may be prone to injury. I know from first hand experience what they are talking about here, as I used to run a lot, and had a succession of running related injuries (shin, right ankle, left hip, sacroiliac joints in the pelvic, lower back, to name a few), which eventually led me to retire from running.

In contrast the authors make specific mention of the high ‘safety factor’ of walking, which they say ‘can be sustained for months or years.’ I have written before about how I sometimes suggest individuals adopt activities they could imagine themselves sustaining into their later years (such as their 80s). Walking usually fits the bill here, while running generally does not. The authors also write about how running generally requires a bigger commitment than walking. Running is harder work, particularly in the initial stages, and the mental barriers to it can be greater than walking. As they point out, walking is easier to do and more conducive to ‘social networking’.

This editorial, I think, is a thoughtful and useful contribution to the conversation on activity and exercise. What the authors do, I believe, is take a balanced and pragmatic approach, highlighting the benefits of a form of activity most people can partake in with little risk of injury and may contribute to enhanced wellbeing and health for pretty much the whole of their lives. Some people love to run, are well suited to it, and that is all good and well. However, for many (including those who are substantially overweight), running is generally not ideal exercise. Many would rather stick pins in their eyes than go running outside or on a treadmill. For a lot of us, walking offers what looks to be a viable and sustainable activity, particularly as we age. Not all of us were ‘born to run’, but almost all of us were ‘born to walk’, I think.
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  #2   ^
Old Fri, Aug-29-14, 12:17
MandalayVA's Avatar
MandalayVA MandalayVA is offline
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Plan: whole foods
Stats: 240/183/140 Female 64 inches
BF:too f'ing much
Progress: 57%
Location: Richmond, VA
Default

I've read in many different places that the reason knee and hip replacements are skyrocketing is because of running. I'm at the age where a lot of people I know are having to get joint replacements. Most of them are or were runners.
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  #3   ^
Old Fri, Aug-29-14, 12:27
SunnyDinCA SunnyDinCA is offline
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Plan: Atkins/Keto-Queen
Stats: 257/151.0/150 Female 5-8
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Progress: 99%
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I will NEVER be a runner....I will NEVER be in a running marathon....and I am TOTALLY ok with that ^_^
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  #4   ^
Old Fri, Aug-29-14, 12:40
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khrussva khrussva is offline
Posts: 5,940
 
Plan: My own - < 30 net carbs
Stats: 440/208/210 Male 5' 11"
BF:Energy Unleashed
Progress: 101%
Location: Central Virginia - USA
Default

I started a walking routine last May as a 375 pound, 51 year old guy with achy feet, lower back issues and sciatic nerve pain. Before that, I was a fully committed couch potato. I started out at doing 3 or 4 half mile walks per week -- and at a snails pace, I might add. That was about all I could do. But it didn't take long before I could do more. It didn't take long before I started feeling the benefits all day long. I started having more stamina, more energy, and less aches & pains. To make a long story short, I now walk 2 or 3 miles a day 4 to 6 times a week. I'm walking about 3 mph, and at my weight -- that is good enough to get my blood pumping. I still have lower back pains and sciatic nerve issues with from time to time -- but they have not gotten worse -- they've gotten better. I've lost weight at a steady clip over the summer, too (35 pounds or so). I can't say that I love doing my walking routine. I don't think I will ever "love" exercise. But I do love how it has greatly improved my quality of life and in such a short period of time, too. Living the LC WOE gives me plenty of energy and walking is a nice way to burn some of it off. If an old tub like me can do it, then most anyone else can as well.

I've always known that walking is good for you. Nice to see from the studies that it is as beneficial as running but w/o the additional risk of injury. I was a committed jogger back in my early 20's -- but I think my running days are behind me. A good walk a couple of times a week is all I need.

Last edited by khrussva : Fri, Aug-29-14 at 12:59.
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  #5   ^
Old Fri, Aug-29-14, 13:46
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 9,549
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
Default

Ken, I'm with you on just walking...nothing better. I use to listen to music, now I listen to a long list of low carb and Paleo podcasts I can really get wrapped up in those interviews that reinforce this lifestyle

Mandalay, completely agree!!! I'm in an area with many retirees and seem to be in the minority not to have at least one new hip or knee to brag about. And Medicare pays for them all, what a racket for the orthopedic surgeons. Most former runners..oh, and one cheerleader.
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  #6   ^
Old Mon, Oct-27-14, 09:44
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costello22 costello22 is offline
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Plan: VLC
Stats: 251.2/231.4/230 Female 5'5.5"
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Progress: 93%
Default

I just did a couch to 5k program. Started training on August 18 and ran my first 5k on October 4. I managed to run the whole way. It took me 45 minutes, but I did it.

I've found that I love running. I hope all joints hold up, so I can keep on doing it.
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  #7   ^
Old Mon, Oct-27-14, 10:33
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Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
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Posts: 45,211
 
Plan: Paleo 99.5%
Stats: 210/170/160 Female 67.5"
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Progress: 80%
Location: San Diego, CA
Default

My body never liked running. Even in Elementary school I was the slowest runner, although I didn't hate it like I did a few years later.

Swimming though, I love. So much easier on the joints. Nowadays I do water aerobics. Classes or else just on my own. I can get my heart rate up well beyond walking, do sprints, and do resistance training all in the water.

Getting harder to get in the pool since it is (finally) beginning to cool off in S. CA.
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  #8   ^
Old Mon, Oct-27-14, 11:24
costello22's Avatar
costello22 costello22 is offline
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Plan: VLC
Stats: 251.2/231.4/230 Female 5'5.5"
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Progress: 93%
Default

I'm really enjoying the running. I've never visited the exercise section of these forums before. I'm disappointed not to find more info on running while in ketosis. I'm not running to lose weight, but I'd like to maintain my diet while running. I'm finding that challenging. Maybe that's because everyone seems to say you need to eat more carbs to run, so I have no good role models to look to. Maybe I've just psyched myself out.

I've gained about 6 pounds since I started running a few months ago. I'd like to be under 180 again by my birthday (Nov. 24). I weighed in at 186.4 this morning. I also have a 5k scheduled for Nov. 22 that I'd like to be able to function for. I hope those aren't contradictory goals, because I know I'm going to have to dive back into deep ketosis to lose that weight.
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  #9   ^
Old Mon, Oct-27-14, 11:28
costello22's Avatar
costello22 costello22 is offline
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Plan: VLC
Stats: 251.2/231.4/230 Female 5'5.5"
BF:
Progress: 93%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nancy LC
My body never liked running. Even in Elementary school I was the slowest runner, although I didn't hate it like I did a few years later.


This made me remember that I was a very fast runner in elementary school. You know when I started hating it? When I was told I needed to exercise and cut calories simultaneously in order to lose weight. Talk about a recipe to make someone hate exercise. Delete their energy by starving them, then tell them to exercise. Boo!
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  #10   ^
Old Mon, Oct-27-14, 12:28
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
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Posts: 45,211
 
Plan: Paleo 99.5%
Stats: 210/170/160 Female 67.5"
BF:
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Location: San Diego, CA
Default

Could your weight gain be cortisol related? I know hard training can raise cortisol.

I do have memories of running in elementary school and pretending I was flying. LOL!
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  #11   ^
Old Mon, Oct-27-14, 12:32
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Whofan Whofan is offline
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Posts: 2,550
 
Plan: Low Carb Primal
Stats: 170/135/135 Female 5ft.6in.
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: New York Metro area
Default

I was a fat little elementary schoolkid who was always last in school races, couldn't climb a rope ladder or vault over a gym horse. And I was terrified of doing that thing where you tuck your head in and roll your body over on the ground (somersault?). Not surprisingly I learned to hate running and all forms of exercise. Then came the teens and 20s years - not fat any more but lazy. Exercise was still completely out of the question unless it was dancing in a discotheque.

I can't remember what motivated me, but I started walking at age 34 and the first walk lasted a whopping 5 minutes (2.5 minutes each way ). But like khrussva, it didn't take long to build up mileage and timing. I am so grateful I started walking - it's one of the 3 best things I ever did for my health. The other two were quitting smoking and going lc. In my 30s I did a bit of running too but never enjoyed it. Just for the sheer pleasure of it, I still walk miles every day to and from work, at lunchtime, and long hikes at weekends. I will also, once a year, jog around the local high school track, just to see if I've still got it - and so far I have, at age 65.

I'd urge anyone who is ambulatory to take up walking as a hobby. The first outing doesn't even have to be as long as 2.5 minutes
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  #12   ^
Old Mon, Oct-27-14, 12:54
costello22's Avatar
costello22 costello22 is offline
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Posts: 2,537
 
Plan: VLC
Stats: 251.2/231.4/230 Female 5'5.5"
BF:
Progress: 93%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nancy LC
Could your weight gain be cortisol related? I know hard training can raise cortisol.


It may or may not be cortisol; I don't know. I do know I'm eating lots more carbs. Lots more. Teasing out how much of that is driven by hormones and how much self-talk or whatever would be difficult. Well, maybe we'll know soon, because I'm going to try to force the issue. Lower carbs, lower protein, keep running. We'll see what happens. Wish me luck!
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  #13   ^
Old Mon, Oct-27-14, 13:57
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bkloots bkloots is offline
Posts: 8,857
 
Plan: Atkins/LCHF
Stats: 195/149.7/135 Female 63in
BF:
Progress: 76%
Location: Kansas City, MO
Default

Come to think of it, when I was a little girl, I loved to run. Only I called it trotting, cantering, and galloping because I was pretending to be a horse.

Fast forward to my 30s, I came to love running again. It was a great combo of solitude (those dawn runs through the neighborhood) and social life (meeting running friends at 10k races--they were mostly 10k then--and being in a club).

Now I love walking for fitness, and also for sightseeing. The changing seasons. The storefronts you never see driving by in a car. The architecture of houses and churches. The nature stuff you come across, like birds' nests and caterpillars. I live in the neighborhood of a museum, so I get outdoor art, too.

I sometimes wear light wrist weights, and often use my walking music tapes with the great beat. A couple of them were produced by Dr. Ken Cooper, the guy who coined the word "aerobics." I never get tired of the little pep talks at the beginning and end of the 30-minute segments.

I'm a big fan of Dr. Briffa, by the way.
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  #14   ^
Old Tue, Oct-28-14, 04:10
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 9,549
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
Default

Hey Costello! You may have recently gained six, but aren't you many pounds lighter than when you started the "Dairy" thread? Celebrate the lost weight and your desire to ramp up exercise. How's the dairy-free life going? I recently added back yogurt, doesn't seem to affect me, but always have lingering doubts.

There are more endurance athletes who now compete while in Ketosis, but for the science and how to formulate a diet, Phinney and Volek are the most inspiring and they have helpful information on YouTube interviews. A good overview and short 'how to' covering ketogenic diet composition on this LC tour: http://m.youtube.com/playlist?list=...jUpuwO7TLslIGpJ Dr. Noakes talk also good.
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  #15   ^
Old Thu, Oct-30-14, 06:48
costello22's Avatar
costello22 costello22 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 2,537
 
Plan: VLC
Stats: 251.2/231.4/230 Female 5'5.5"
BF:
Progress: 93%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
Hey Costello! You may have recently gained six, but aren't you many pounds lighter than when you started the "Dairy" thread?


Yep. Much lighter. Dairy had crept back into my diet, unfortunately, but in much smaller quantity than before. As of Oct. 27, it's out again. I want to be under 180 again by my birthday, Nov. 24.

I've been pretty proud of my weight loss - until I met with a new doctor on Tuesday. I told her my high weight was 250, and I really wasn't expecting to lose much more. I think a bariatric specialist would have been impressed. She was just like "well, you'd have to cut calories even more or exercise more." I just groaned internally and thought, "Oh, you're one of those!" I guess it was too much to hope for another Mary Vernon.

I left the appointment feeling depressed and like a failure.
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