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  #1   ^
Old Tue, Nov-16-10, 19:00
livesimply livesimply is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,367
 
Plan: NOT dieting
Stats: 185/162.5/130 Female 5' 1/2"
BF:
Progress: 41%
Location: Delaware
Default Ray Peat Eating Guidelines

Okay, so here are the Peat guidelines as best as I have figured out with much help (thank you Lynn, Cathy, Diet F**ked Blog, Matt Stone, Kurt Harris of PāNu, and of course Ray Peat):

Proteins: Daily protein should be at least 80 grams, preferably 100 if you are working or otherwise active. An egg has about 6 grams, a quart of milk about 32 grams, meat, cheese, and fish are usually about 20% protein, so a pound would be enough for a day. It's important to have fruit or other carbohydrate with the protein for efficient metabolism. Milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish are good protein sources, and potato protein is high in quality, if the potato is very well cooked and eaten with butter or cream. Although potatoes contain only about 2% protein, a kilogram of potato has roughly the protein value of a liter of milk (which is 3% protein), because of its high quality. Unless you are buying eggs from a verified grass-fed, free range source he recommends limiting them to one or two a day, and making sure to have plenty of carbohydrate around the same time.

Meats like ground beef, steak, liver, and pork chops are rich in cysteine, which “turns off” the thyroid gland as soon as your body uses up it’s glycogen and ideally shouldn't be your main source of protein. Muscle meats such as chicken/turkey breasts should be eaten with the gelatin it comes with, or supplemental gelatin (see below), to balance out an anti-thyroid amino acid called tryptophan (which is also found in whey protein formulations). Traditionally, muscle meats are eaten with the fat, skin and the gelatin that they come with, so this is mostly an issue in first-world countries where we have protein powders and pure muscle meats readily available. Chicken liver contains such a small amount of fat it's okay to have in addition to or instead of beef liver (which should be consumed weekly). Pork or chicken once a week is okay if your metabolic rate (thyroid function) is good. When chicken is stewed, gelatin from the skin is valuable, and much of the fat can be skimmed off. With any of the muscle meats, including fish, gelatin is helpful for balancing the high cysteine, methionine, and tryptophan content. Regarding bacon, Peat says, “The nitrate isn't likely to be a problem if you eat it with orange juice. I fry the bacon to remove some of the fat, and then refry it in coconut oil, to remove most of the PUFA.”

Fatty fish like salmon and herring should be avoided because their fat content is mostly unsaturated; as a general rule, cold blooded animals like fish tend to produce unsaturated fats while warm blooded animals like cows and pigs tend to produce saturated and monounsaturated fats. Cod and sole are good fish, since they have the marine minerals (especially selenium), but low fat content. Tuna is good as protein, but the fat it contains is highly polyunsaturated; eating once a week, especially with homemade coconut mayo should be safe.of course

Regarding his recommendation of daily gelatin: For an adult, gelatin can be a major protein in the diet, since the need for cysteine and tryptophan decreases greatly when growth slows. Ox-tail soup (boiled for 4 or 5 hours) and lamb shanks have a good proportion of gelatin. I think most stores have gelatin in one pound packages or bigger, for example Great Lakes gelatin is usually around $11 per pound. If a person eats a large serving of meat, it's probably helpful to have 5–10 grams of gelatin at approximately the same time, so that the amino acids enter the blood stream in balance. Asian grocery stores are likely to sell some of the traditional gelatin-rich foods, such as prepared pig skin and ears and tails, and chicken feet. Although the prepared powdered gelatin doesn't require any cooking, dissolving it in hot water makes it digest a little more quickly. It can be incorporated into custards, mousses, ice cream, soups, sauces, cheese cake, pies, etc., or mixed with fruit juices to make desserts or (with juice concentrate) candies.

Peat is a big fan of dairy. He prefers milk with no added vitamins, raw if you can get it, but uses standard pasteurized-homogenized when there’s no alternative. He prefers cheese made without enzymes, just animal rennet. He doesn't use yogurt because of the lactic acid and/or lactobacillus. He avoids anything with gums in it, like cream cheese. Ice cream like Haagen Dazs is okay since it has no carageenan or gums like guar/carob bean– these are often found in foods like cream cheese, canned coconut milk, and half-and-half; make sure that the ice cream does not have any vegetable oil in it as some varieties include this. Regarding yogurt, in quantities of an ounce or so, for flavoring, it's o.k., but the lactic acid content isn't good if you are using yogurt as a major source of your protein and calcium; it triggers the inflammatory reactions, leading to fibrosis eventually, and the immediate effect is to draw down the liver's glycogen stores for energy to convert it into glucose. Cottage cheese, that is, milk curds with salt, is very good, if you can find it without additives, but traditional cottage cheese was almost fat-free, so when they make it with whole milk you should watch for other innovations that might not be beneficial.

Although Peat basically scorns legumes, he said hummus in small amounts isn't nutritionally harmful, though chickpeas and tahini are both allergenic for some people.

Fats: Best sources are coconut oil and butter; olive oil and macadamia nut oil sparingly. He is a big fan of (refined) coconut oil to stimulate the metabolism. Among nuts and nut oils, macadamia is probably the safest. See the Omega-6 list below for more info.

Carbohydrates: Have some with every meal to prevent hypoglycemia after eating the proteins.
Fruit and fruit juices – If you're able to do it, try to consume fresh fruits and fruit juices every day. Orange juice is great because of it’s potassium and magnesium content. Tropical fruits and juices are excellent too. If you don’t have a juicer at home, you can buy pasteurized juices with no additives that say “not from concentrate” on the label. Juices that are from concentrate are made up of mostly added water that is flouridated. Fruits in general are fine (tropical are best), but grapefruit is full of phytoestrogens, so avoid it, and berries are full of small seeds you can't avoid, so it's better to skip them. He recommends avoiding bananas and other starchy-poorly-ripened-industrialized fruits, which includes most apples and pears (when these are ripe, peeled and cooked they are much more nutritious, and safer). Organic dried fruits are fine as long as they are not treated with sulfur dioxide; canned fruits are okay, especially if they are in glass. You can have a small apple and some cheese as a snack occasionally if it doesn't cause any digestive or allergic symptoms—the fat in the cheese is protective against the starch in incompletely ripened fruit.

Tubers – Potato, yams; occasionally well-cooked grains in the order of best to least desirable: masa harina, white rice or oats, brown rice. The phytic acid in the oats block absorption of much of the calcium; cooking the oats much longer than usual might improve its nutritional value. Canned plain pumpkin if eaten with some fat is okay, but carrots are less starchy for similar effects.

He recommends eating a raw carrot daily, particularly a raw carrot salad with coconut oil, for both its bowel-protective and an anti-estrogen effect. Summer squash and bamboo shoots are the best cooked vegetables; well cooked kale and broccoli are okay, too. Carrots are best salad. The fiber in whole vegetables helps protect against the effects of the unsaturated fats they contain (in comparison to fruit), which means that juiced vegetables with none of the protective fiber will act as a thyroid inhibitor because of the concentrated PUFAs. There isn’t anything wrong with using vegetables as a smaller part of your diet, but salads and steamed vegetable dishes shouldn’t be the main part of anyone’s diet. He recommends avoiding avocados as they contain so much unsaturated fat that they can be carcinogenic and hepatotoxic (toxic to the liver).

Beverages: Coffee supports the metabolism but has to be consumed with some sugar or with meal to prevent stress response due to low blood sugar. Because of the tannins in tea, it's important to use either lemon or milk (or cream). The histamine in red wine is a special problem for hypothyroid people, usually it isn't harmful.

Avoid: PUFAs and soy. PUFAs are found in processed foods, nuts and seeds and their butters, vegetable oils. Also keep in mind that if you have been eating PUFAs in the past, the oil change in your tissues takes up to four years during which your fat stores will be releasing enough PUFAs to cause you some troubles, so it requires some patience and also some skillful means to counteract their effects, like getting some extra vitamin E or a little thyroid to counteract their antithyroid action etc. It all depends on how your metabolism works.

Chocolate is okay as long as there are no additives.

For salty cravings, Peat recommends tortilla chips fried in coconut oil, and chicharrones (pork rinds) with no additive but salt (puffed in hot air). Another snack is popcorn popped on the stove in coconut oil, then salted & buttered; the oil and butter are protective against the starch, but it's harder to digest than tortilla chips or chicharrones.

Vinegar is a good antiseptic when it's used with raw carrot, but watch for sulfite when using regularly.

Maple syrup is heated to a fairly high temperature, and this creates some sugar-derived chemicals that can be allergenic and might be toxic.

Regarding whey protein, Peat says, “Powdered foods that contain tryptophan are extremely susceptible to harmful oxidation, and the best things are removed, for example calcium, lactose, and casein, with its anti-stress properties.”

Everything else is somewhere in between - it won't kill you if consumed, but unless you are healthy it's better to prefer above-listed foods.

This is from Matt Stone’s RRARF:
Omega 6 content of common foods by percentage of total calories:
Omega 666 – the most Evil omega 6 powerhouses (over 50%)
Grapeseed oil 70.6%!!!
Corn Oil 54.5%
Walnuts 52.5% (oil is 53.9%)
Cottonseed oil 52.4%
Soybean oil 51.4%
Very High Omega 6 sources (20-50%)
Sesame oil 42.0%
Pepitas 34.5% Margarine 27.9%
Pecans 26.9%
Peanut Butter 22.5%
Pistachios 21.3%
High Omega 6 Sources (10-20%)
Chicken Fat 19.5%
Almonds 19.1%
Canola oil 19.0%
Flaxseed oil 12.9%
Cashews 12.6%
Duck Fat 12.2%
Bacon Grease 10.2%
Lard 10.2%
Moderate Omega 6 Sources (5-10%)
Olive oil 9.9%
Goose Fat 9.8%
Avocado 9.4%
Chicken with skin 9.0%
Olives 7.4%
Bacon 7.0%
Eggs 6.8%
Pork chops 6.2%
Popcorn (Air Popped) 5.8%
Oats 5.6%
Low Omega 6 Sources (2-5%)
Corn 4.7%
Chicken Liver 3.7%
Sunflower Oil 3.7% (High oleic variety - others are very high in omega 6)
Butter 3.4%
Beef Tallow 3.1%
Cocoa Butter 2.8%
Cooked carrots 2.7%
Macadamia Nut oil ~2.5%
Brown rice 2.5%
Cream 2.2%
Beef liver 2.1% Grass-fed Beef 2.0%
Whole wheat flour 2.0%
Extremely low Omega 6 Sources (Less than 2%)
Coconut oil 1.9%
Prime rib 1.8%
Whole milk 1.8%
Half and Half 1.8%
Ground Beef 1.6%
Macadamia Nuts 1.6%
Chicken without skin 1.4%
Lamb 1.4%
Cheese/Brie 1.3%
Corn grits 1.2%
Beets 1.2%
Coconut Milk 1.1%
Foie gras 1.1%
Palm Kernel Oil 0.8%
White rice 0.7%
Sockeye Salmon 0.5%
Yams 0.4%
Potatoes 0.3%
Halibut 0.2%
Shrimp 0.2%
Clams 0.2%
Canned tuna 0.1%
Blue crab 0.1%
Lobster 0.1%

***********

Good websites to learn more:
http://www.raypeat.com - excellent articles with lots of explanations for his guidelines
http://www.paleonu.com/panu-weblog/...s-and-oils.html
http://diet-fucked.blogspot.com/200...de-to-food.html - hate the name of this blog, which is evidently no longer active, but the information is invaluable and offers some further explanation for food choices.


Some people report doing better limiting sugar (as in ice cream or chocolate) to weekend treats or special occasions, and simply having fruit as their dessert after dinner.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

If anyone else has any other information, PLEASE add your post.
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  #2   ^
Old Tue, Nov-16-10, 19:33
Cathy B. Cathy B. is offline
Posts: 3,115
 
Plan: Intuitive Ray Peat
Stats: 321/262.8/239 Female 63 inches
BF:
Progress: 71%
Location: Virginia, USA
Default

Great job, Debbie! Thanks for doing this!

Cathy
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  #3   ^
Old Tue, Nov-16-10, 21:07
jem51 jem51 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,238
 
Plan: Mine, all mine
Stats: 160/120/120 Female 5'6"
BF:still got some
Progress: 100%
Location: Oregon
Default

nice job.
i gave up on the diet-f--- site since there never seemed to be anything after the estrogenic frogs...i think.
too bad since i have never found any other uncle Ray bloggers which makes me think that no one ever really figured it out.

i did, however, e mail him re the yogurt/lactic acid thing and he actually responded the same day!! that was quite unexpected.

i would love to see how you've put this together for yourself and what a day in the life consists of.
if you care to share.....thanks.
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  #4   ^
Old Wed, Nov-17-10, 04:30
Scarlet's Avatar
Scarlet Scarlet is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 6,344
 
Plan: Gluten free wholefoods
Stats: 173/145/149 Female 5"5.75 inches
BF:37/?/25
Progress: 117%
Default

My friend is a big Peat devotee and has been following him for a year. She has lost weight and gotten pregnant (she had been trying for two years) from following his plan.

She regularly emails with Peat followers, so there must be a few of them around. She is very busy now, so I haven't had the chance to ask her what happened to the DietF***ed blog.

I would be careful with the sugar in Peat's plan. My friend gained weight from eating that. So, if the plan is not working, the first thing I'd do is drop the sugar. She only has ice cream as a treat on the weekends for example.
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  #5   ^
Old Wed, Nov-17-10, 04:32
Scarlet's Avatar
Scarlet Scarlet is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 6,344
 
Plan: Gluten free wholefoods
Stats: 173/145/149 Female 5"5.75 inches
BF:37/?/25
Progress: 117%
Default

This is a Peat inspired blog: http://laproline.blogspot.com/
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  #6   ^
Old Wed, Nov-17-10, 05:03
livesimply livesimply is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,367
 
Plan: NOT dieting
Stats: 185/162.5/130 Female 5' 1/2"
BF:
Progress: 41%
Location: Delaware
Default

Well, here is a site with guidelines similar to Peat's: http://litalee.com/shopexd.asp?id=179 and she also focuses on healthy thyroid function as key to good health (as does Peat).

I've emailed Peat several times and was also surprised by his quick responses.

First, I can't say I am following his recommendations 100%. I tend to be an "all or nothing" kind of person which can get me into trouble as that can be UNrealistic. I am trying hard to really listen to my body AND be sensible about all of this, so in keeping with Mark Sisson's 80/20 rule http://www.marksdailyapple.com/8020-principle/ I am not going to beat myself up for deviations from Peat's guidelines, whether they be occasional splurges or tweaks to make the plan fit my life, my tastes, and my needs. And, borrowing from Cathy , have decided to prioritize my goals as such:

1. Improve thyroid function, which includes balancing other hormones, improving sleep, and raising basal body temperature
2. Find a food plan that is user friendly and that makes me feel healthy and happy
3. Lose weight
4. Incorporate more movement into my daily life, for improved flexibility, strength and endurance

…..and above all, to get on with life and not allow this WOE to grab more attention than it deserves—life is too short to not live it!

Okay, a Peat-influenced typical day (thus far):
5:00 AM coffee & HnH, small bowl of arborio rice pudding w/ HnH
8:00 AM coffee & HnH, 2 eggs, fried small potato & onions, 2 slices bacon, small glass orange juice
1:00 PM cottage cheese w/ cooked apple, a few corn tortilla chips crisped in oven, decaf iced tea w/ lemon
4:00 PM coffee & HnH, some fresh pineapple & small block of cheese
6:30 PM grilled ribeye, baked sweet potato w/ butter & cinnamon, maybe a small side of veg & butter OR small salad w/ grated carrot & EVOO vinaigrette; gelatin mixed in OJ (this keeps me full till bedtime)
water to thirst

I'm avoiding sugar like ice cream except for special treats—just too dangerous for me to have around (although my rice pudding does have a bit of real sugar in it). I had recently purchased 6 bottles of very good EVOO so I will use them up in my vinaigrettes before switching to CO. I have had success with making CO mayo—here's the recipe:

Mayonnaise
Makes 1 generous cup

2 egg yolks

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard (optional)

2 teaspoons unseasoned rice or white wine vinegar

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

1 cup liquid coconut oil (melt in bowl of warm water, do not nuke)

Put the egg yolks, salt, mustard, lemon juice, and vinegar in the food processor. Pulse 4 or 5 times to combine well. Remove the feed tube, if it is still in place. Run the machine and pour the oil through the feed tube in a thin (less than ¼ inch wide), steady stream until completely incorporated. The mixture will thicken as the oil gets worked in, and the sputtering will diminish by the time the sauce becomes super thick and creamy. It should take 2 to 3 minutes to add the oil.

If the mayonnaise seems overly stiff, work in water by the teaspoon. Taste and adjust the flavor for extra salt and mustard, pulsing the machine to blend the ingredients. Transfer to an airtight container, cover, and refrigerate for up to a 2 weeks. To maintain freshness beyond 2 weeks, add 1 Tbs. whey (drained from yogurt)

Variations:
Creamy Vinaigrette–just add 3 parts mayo to 1 part vinegar of choice and whisk together
Tartar Sauce–just add capers, chopped pickles, grated onion, parsley, and pinch of cayenne pepper

Last edited by livesimply : Wed, Nov-17-10 at 05:28. Reason: changed typical menu
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  #7   ^
Old Thu, Nov-18-10, 16:47
Scarlet's Avatar
Scarlet Scarlet is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 6,344
 
Plan: Gluten free wholefoods
Stats: 173/145/149 Female 5"5.75 inches
BF:37/?/25
Progress: 117%
Default

Can that mayo be made without a machine? Can it be done by hand?
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  #8   ^
Old Fri, Nov-19-10, 07:07
livesimply livesimply is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,367
 
Plan: NOT dieting
Stats: 185/162.5/130 Female 5' 1/2"
BF:
Progress: 41%
Location: Delaware
Default

Hey Lynn,
Yes, I think it can. The original recipe (I've tweaked it) can be found here: Easy Homemade Mayonnaise where she discusses different techniques. Also check out this short video where you can see it being made with a single beater.
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  #9   ^
Old Fri, Nov-19-10, 09:50
Scarlet's Avatar
Scarlet Scarlet is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 6,344
 
Plan: Gluten free wholefoods
Stats: 173/145/149 Female 5"5.75 inches
BF:37/?/25
Progress: 117%
Default

Great interview with Peat on diet and hypothyroidism:

http://www.thyroid-info.com/articles/ray-peat.htm
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  #10   ^
Old Fri, Nov-19-10, 13:39
Cathy B. Cathy B. is offline
Posts: 3,115
 
Plan: Intuitive Ray Peat
Stats: 321/262.8/239 Female 63 inches
BF:
Progress: 71%
Location: Virginia, USA
Default

Yes, that is a great article. I have read it countless time and I still pick up something useful every time I read it.

Cathy
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  #11   ^
Old Sun, Nov-21-10, 08:50
livesimply livesimply is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,367
 
Plan: NOT dieting
Stats: 185/162.5/130 Female 5' 1/2"
BF:
Progress: 41%
Location: Delaware
Default

Here are a few various add'l guidelines:

Raisins seem to be generally o.k., the acid in dried cranberries can be a problem.

All starches should be cooked, including macadamia nuts; however, be aware tat most nuts are roasted in peanut oil which is very high in PUFAs, so it's better to buy them raw and roast them yourself.
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  #12   ^
Old Sun, Nov-21-10, 14:36
livesimply livesimply is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,367
 
Plan: NOT dieting
Stats: 185/162.5/130 Female 5' 1/2"
BF:
Progress: 41%
Location: Delaware
Default

One great thing about eating a la Peat guidelines right now…..clementines are in season and I love them!
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  #13   ^
Old Mon, Nov-22-10, 04:41
livesimply livesimply is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,367
 
Plan: NOT dieting
Stats: 185/162.5/130 Female 5' 1/2"
BF:
Progress: 41%
Location: Delaware
Default May Recipe Needs Modification to Not Solidify in Fridge

Hmmm…..for some reason I can't edit the Mayo Recipe here, I'm not getting the edit button.

Anyway, I JUST discovered that the mayo solidifies in the fridge as written, so I think it needs some modification. Will be back to post after I tweak it.
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  #14   ^
Old Mon, Nov-22-10, 06:43
livesimply livesimply is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 4,367
 
Plan: NOT dieting
Stats: 185/162.5/130 Female 5' 1/2"
BF:
Progress: 41%
Location: Delaware
Default Modified Mayo Recipe

Okay, here's the Mayo Recipe modified—you can't use all coconut oil or it WILL solidify:

Makes 1 generous cup

2 egg yolks
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard (optional)
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
2 teaspoons unseasoned rice or white wine vinegar
1/2 cup liquid refined coconut oil (neutral tasting)
1/2 cup macadamia nut oil (or olive oil or hi-oleic expeller pressed sunflower oil)

Put the egg yolks, salt, mustard, lemon juice, and vinegar in the food processor. Pulse 4 or 5 times to combine well. Remove the feed tube, if it is still in place. Run the machine and pour the oil through the feed tube in a thin (less than ¼ inch wide), steady stream until completely incorporated. The mixture will thicken as the oil gets worked in, and the sputtering will diminish by the time the sauce becomes super thick and creamy. It should take 2 to 3 minutes to add the oil.

If the mayonnaise seems overly stiff, work in water by the teaspoon. Taste and adjust the flavor for extra salt and mustard, pulsing the machine to blend the ingredients. Transfer to an airtight container, cover, and refrigerate for up to a 2 weeks. To maintain freshness beyond 2 weeks, add 1 Tbs. whey (drained from yogurt)


You can also check out this video and recipe—but it's still easier to do it in the food processor (and get it out of the work bowl):
Coconut Mayonnaise
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  #15   ^
Old Mon, Nov-22-10, 12:10
TigerLily1's Avatar
TigerLily1 TigerLily1 is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,745
 
Plan: No idea
Stats: 145/-/125 Female 165
BF:
Progress: 125%
Default

Are you eating grains on this plan - I noted you are eating rice pudding, what about oatmeal/porridge / Musli?
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