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  #76   ^
Old Wed, Jun-17-09, 10:58
capmikee's Avatar
capmikee capmikee is offline
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Posts: 5,160
 
Plan: Weston A. Price, GFCF
Stats: 165/133/132 Male 5' 5"
BF:?/12.7%/?
Progress: 97%
Location: Philadelphia
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Did you see this thread?

http://forum.lowcarber.org/showthread.php?t=396831

Quote:
Studies show that people who get lots of sun, like farmers, are less likely to get melanoma than office workers.
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  #77   ^
Old Wed, Jun-17-09, 14:34
Jayppers's Avatar
Jayppers Jayppers is offline
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Plan: Mostly carnivory
Stats: 145/145/145 Male 5'11'' (feet and inches)
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Progress: -20%
Location: Ohio
Question

Quote:
However, perhaps more telling that this was the finding that there was a relationship between the vitamin D levels and the extent of weight loss: the higher the vitamin D levels, the greater the weight loss. Again, this study also cannot be used to conclude that vitamin D can assist weight loss. But it is another piece of evidence which ties vitamin D to body weight control.
Why not? It seems pretty straight forward to me. I can attest to the weight loss & lean body mass producing powers of adequate D myself, even though I'm not overweight. Is he just being weary of not confusing correlation with causation, or all that scientific review terminology I haven't quite got down yet?
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  #78   ^
Old Wed, Jun-17-09, 14:47
Hutchinson's Avatar
Hutchinson Hutchinson is offline
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Posts: 2,886
 
Plan: Dr Dahlqvist's
Stats: 205/152/160 Male 69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayppers
Is he just being weary of not confusing correlation with causation, or all that scientific review terminology I haven't quite got down yet?
He's had to deal with a lot of fairly severe criticism in the past so I think is being overly cautious. It's all very well for me to point to a prolonged intake of 10,000 IU/d of vitamin D(3) poses no risk of adverse effects for adults, even if this is added to a rather high physiologic background level of vitamin D. and say you may as well aim high initially and then reduce your supplement intake after you have had a 25(OH)D test proving you are above 55ng ~ 137.5nmol/l but it's another thing for a Dr to say that as it could be interpreted as medical advice. It's still not clear how vitamin D status is associated with fat storage. On interesting theory is that when our vitamin D status drops in the winter, this is a signal for the body to store fat (and vitamin D3) to help survival through the winter. So lowering vitamin D levels are regarded by the body as time to stock up for the winter. While rising 25(OH)D indicate that summer's on the way and so we no longer need to store surplus fats.
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  #79   ^
Old Thu, Jun-18-09, 01:18
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nawchem nawchem is offline
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Default Off current discussion...

I saw my dr today about vit D. He said he tests people all the time that are very tan, living in san diego, with low levels and told me to take at least 1000mg D3/day. Settled that for me.
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  #80   ^
Old Thu, Jun-18-09, 07:42
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 21,759
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 215/170/160 Female 5'10"
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Progress: 82%
Location: UK
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From The Times:
June 18, 2009

Quote:
Is lack of vitamin D linked to swine flu?

Scotland has a disproportionately high number of swine flu cases. There could be a simple reason

Melanie Reid


It was all very predictable, I suppose, that when the first UK death from someone suffering from swine flu came, it did not come from St Ives or St Andrews. Jacqueline Fleming lived on a rundown council estate in Glasgow; she came from the other Scotland, the bleak one we garland with jokes and statistics but ultimately prefer to ignore.

The H1N1 outbreak is an uncomfortable reminder that the health gap both between the rich and the poor in Scotland, and between Scotland and practically everywhere else in Europe, is not only inescapable - it is, sadly, one of the things that define this country.

How symbolic that Ms Fleming, 38 - the first person with swine flu outside the Americas to die - lived of all places in poor little Carnwadric, a deprived council ward in the West of Scotland. She is, in death, a Scottish landmark, an unintended indictment of this country's disproportionately woeful health record.

Ms Fleming apparently suffered from strokes and seizures. She was described as “a good, quiet woman”; a full-time mother, who lived an existence constrained by lack of opportunity and income. She was expecting her third child. When she caught the illness, which had occurred at a local primary school, she was made doubly vulnerable through her chronic condition and by virtue of the pregnancy.

She fell gravely ill, gave birth to her baby at 29 weeks and died two weeks later without regaining consciousness. Her child, Jack, who did not have the virus, died 24 hours later: a private double tragedy that echoed round the world.

The following day, I was invited on The Jeremy Vine Show. We want to ask, said the researcher, why Scotland? Why is swine flu cutting swaths across Scotland, and killing people? The unvoiced question hovered: what's wrong with you people that makes you the sickest in half the world?

You can understand where they were coming from. Scotland has 530 confirmed cases of swine flu, 441 possible cases and 300 clinically diagnosed possibles - a total of more than 1,200. By comparison, bigger countries are relatively unscathed. England, with ten times the people, only has 1,062 cases, Austria 7, Portugal 3, France 80, Germany 170, Spain 488 and Ireland 12.

Beneath the soundbites, there are several answers. One can say with absolute certainty that there has been better monitoring here. NHS Scotland and its many limbs, Health Protection Scotland and Health Scotland and NHS Quality Improvement Scotland and the Healthcare Environment Inspectorate and the Information Services Division - I could go on - are just part of one of the most impressive health service data engines in the world. In this regard Scotland purrs along like a Rolls-Royce: few other nations have information that combines high-quality data, consistency, national coverage and the ability to link data to allow patient-based analysis and follow-up. No case of swine flu has a chance of getting away from that lot.

And yes, of course, there's much to monitor. Scotland possesses a health record that would make a Third World dictator wince: hospital admissions from alcohol up 7 per cent on the previous year and up 17 per cent on five years ago; chronic levels of disability from strokes, coronary heart disease and cancer; lung cancer; drug use; a diet built on fat and sugar; and soaring levels of obesity. Surely these endemic weaknesses are what makes us vulnerable to swine flu?

Yes - but it's not the whole answer either. Since devolution, and the pumping in of billions of pounds, NHS Scotland is a fairly magnificent operation. Rates of ill health are declining, although the gap between the most deprived areas and the most affluent is widening, and England's health, similarly blessed with extra funding in the good times, is improving faster than Scotland's.

Which brings us face to face with the disconcerting thing they call the health deficit: the unexplained gap between Scotland's health outcomes and that of the rest of Britain; a gap that still persists even when the epidemiologists factor in all the lifestyle issues; the gap, in other words, that makes the Scots sick no matter how much money is spent on them.

It was fashionable for a while to talk about the biology of poverty, explaining it away by poor housing and a history of deprivation; cooked up with low self-respect and expectation.

But could the puzzle have a simpler answer? Recently The Times has revealed astonishing research showing the links between low vitamin-D levels and poor general health. Multiple sclerosis, cancer and diabetes are just some of the diseases linked to an immune system compromised by lack of the vitamin. And the Scots, living in a cloudy climate, are known to be twice as likely to be vitamin D deficient as the English. Increasing numbers of scientists suspect vitamin D could be the Scots' Achilles' heel.

Influenza, we know, strikes in the winter when vitamin D levels are naturally lowered - hence a possible reason why swine flu is at present widespread in Australia, where it's winter. Could the disproportionate prevalence of H1N1 in Scotland be related to endemic low levels of vitamin D among the population - especially those least likely to buy themselves supplements? It is a huge, intriguing question.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/co...icle6524020.ece
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  #81   ^
Old Thu, Jun-18-09, 09:45
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Jayppers Jayppers is offline
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Plan: Mostly carnivory
Stats: 145/145/145 Male 5'11'' (feet and inches)
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Quote:
1000mg D3/day
I don't even know what this equates to in D3 specific IU measurement, but I'm guessing he either meant or you misheard 'international units (IU)' for miligrams (mg). Additionally, he's recommending, IMO, an overly conservative dose that is really not going to make a substantial difference in 25(OH)D in most people, but I'm glad he said 'at least,' and that he got the form of D correct.
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  #82   ^
Old Mon, Jun-22-09, 06:18
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: LCHF
Stats: 215/170/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 82%
Location: UK
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From Medical News Today:

Quote:
The Possible Roles Of Solar Ultraviolet-B Radiation And Vitamin D In Reducing Case-Fatality Rates From The 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic In EU

22 Jun 2009

An estimated 675,000 Americans died from the A/H1N1 pandemic influenza in the United States in 1918-1919. Many of these deaths were from ensueing bacterial pneumonia rather than directly from the viral infection. The United States Public Health Service conducted surveys in twelve cities and rural areas of the country in late 1918 to early 1919 to determine the case-fatality rate in each city or area. Case-fatality rates varied from 0.78 deaths/100 cases in San Antonio, Texas to 3.14 deaths/100 cases in New London, Connecticut. The strong variation with location suggested that solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiance, through production of vitamin D, reduced the risk of death following infection by this pandemic influenza.

To investigate this possibility, the case-fatality rate data were compared statistically with solar UVB doses in July and January. Strong correlations with UVB doses were found for both indices.

There are two mechanisms whereby vitamin D can reduce the risk of death once the pandemic influenza virus infection took hold: reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines and reduced risk of bacterial pneumonia. The hormonal metabolite of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, reduces the production of cytokines from T-helper 1 type (proinflammatory). 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D also induces the production of human cathelicidin, LL-37, which has both antimicrobial and antiendotoxin properties. LL-37 has been found effective in reducing the risk of several types of bacteria, and is also thought to reduce the risk of respiratory viral infections including seasonal influenza.

Whether this finding is relevant to the current A/H1N1 influenza virus outbreak is unknown but should be evaluated.

"The authors propose a very interesting hypothesis based on intriguing observations that vitamin D deficiency and influenza infection share a similar pattern in incidence during the year. Recent work by several groups have demonstrated that vitamin D induced anti-microbial peptides that may be important for the immune defense against pathogens such as virus. As we are entering the fall and winter season, it may be worth considering addressing vitamin D status in individuals at risk for influenza infection."

Link to paper describing the ecological study*

Source: Sunlight, Nutrition and Health Research Center (SUNARC)


http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/154759.php




Quote:
* The possible roles of solar ultraviolet-B radiation and vitamin D in reducing case-fatality rates from the 1918–1919 influenza pandemic in the United States

William B. Grant and Edward Giovannucci


Volume 1, Issue 4
July/August

Deaths during the 1918–1919 influenza pandemic have been linked to both the influenza virus and secondary bacterial lung infections. Case fatality rates and percentage of influenza cases complicated by pneumonia were available from survey data for twelve United States locations in the 1918–1919 pandemic. This study analyzes case fatality rates and cases complicated by pneumonia with respect to estimated summertime and wintertime solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) doses as indicators of population mean vitamin D status. Substantial correlations were found for associations of July UVB dose with case fatality rates (r = -0.72, p = 0.009) and rates of pneumonia as a complication of influenza (r = -0.77, p = 0.005). Similar results were found for wintertime UVB. Vitamin D upregulates production of human cathelicidin, LL-37, which has both antimicrobial and antiendotoxin activities. Vitamin D also reduces the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which could also explain some of the benefit of vitamin D since H1N1 infection gives rise to a cytokine storm. The potential role of vitamin D status in reducing secondary bacterial infections and loss of life in pandemic influence requires further evaluation.

Authors

William B. Grant
Corresponding author: wbgrant~infionline.net

Sunlight, Nutrition and Health Research Center (SUNARC)

Edward Giovannucci
Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology; Harvard School of Public Health; and Department of Medicine; Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Boston, MA USA

http://www.landesbioscience.com/jou...gy/article/9063
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  #83   ^
Old Mon, Jun-22-09, 09:11
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: LCHF
Stats: 215/170/160 Female 5'10"
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Progress: 82%
Location: UK
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From Dr Briffa's blog:


Quote:
Vitamin D helps to combat tuberculosis, flu and other infections

Posted By Dr John Briffa On June 22, 2009

Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that continues to claim significant numbers of lives around the World. Before the advent of antibiotics, many tuberculosis sufferers were shipped off to ‘sanitoriums’: often rurally-located facilities where individuals would typically spend a year or more to rest, eat well, and hopefully overcome their illness.

While rest and a healthy diet were thought to be the cornerstones of treatment, some have suggested that another maybe beneficial element of sanitorium life was its potential to allow exposure to sunlight. Vitamin D, produced in response to sunlight, is known to have immune-enhancing effects. In one study, for instance, a single dose of vitamin D (2.5 mg/100,000 IU) led to improved immune function against the tuberculosis organism [1].

It is now known that vitamin D (produced in response to sunlight) stimulates the secretion of natural antibiotics known as ‘anti-microbial peptides’. This gives vitamin D the potential to combat a range of infections.

Recently, the role of vitamin D as an anti-infective agent was assessed in the form of a review [2]. 13 studies were reviewed, of which 9 were ‘double-blind and placebo-controlled’ – generally regarded as the best study design to discern whether a treatment has a real benefit or not. Some of these studies assessed the role of vitamin D in the treatment of tuberculosis.

Overall, the results showed that vitamin D therapy shows considerable potential in the treatment of tuberculosis The results also showed vitamin D can be effective for the treatment of other infections, including flu and viral upper respiratory tract illnesses (e.g. cold). In addition, adverse events due to vitamin D supplementation were rare.

This review suggests that ensuring optimal vitamin D levels (through appropriate sunlight exposure, diet and, if necessary, supplementation) is likely to help ensure optimal protection from infection diseases. This has particular relevance in the winter, then vitamin D levels tend bottom out. In fact, lower levels of vitamin D may well be a factor in why it is that infection diseases (such as cold, flu and pneumonia) tend to be more common in the winter. Awhile back I wrote about a study which found lower levels of vitamin D to be associated with a greater need to take sick days due to upper respiratory tract infections (e.g. cold and sore throat). For more about this, see here.

References:

1. Martineau AR, et al. A Single Dose of Vitamin D Enhances Immunity to Mycobacteria American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2007;176:208-213

2. Yamshchikov AV, et al. Vitamin D for Treatment and Prevention of Infectious Diseases: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Endocr Pract. 2nd June 2009 [Epub ahead of print].

http://www.drbriffa.com/blog/2009/0...her-infections/
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  #84   ^
Old Mon, Jun-22-09, 14:32
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: LCHF
Stats: 215/170/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 82%
Location: UK
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From Associated Press:


Quote:
Big US study will test vitamin D, fish oil

22 June, 2009

By MARILYNN MARCHIONE

Two of the most popular and promising dietary supplements — vitamin D and fish oil — will be tested in a large, government-sponsored study to see whether either nutrient can lower a healthy person's risk of getting cancer, heart disease or having a stroke.

It will be one of the first big nutrition studies ever to target a specific racial group — blacks, who will comprise one quarter of the participants.

People with dark skin are unable to make much vitamin D from sunlight, and researchers think this deficiency may help explain why blacks have higher rates of cancer, stroke and heart disease.

"If something as simple as taking a vitamin D pill could help lower these risks and eliminate these health disparities, that would be extraordinarily exciting," said Dr. JoAnn Manson. She and Dr. Julie Buring, of Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, will co-lead the study.

"But we should be cautious before jumping on the bandwagon to take mega-doses of these supplements," Manson warned. "We know from history that many of these nutrients that looked promising in observational studies didn't pan out."

Vitamins C, E, folic acid, beta carotene, selenium and even menopause hormone pills once seemed to lower the risk of cancer or heart disease — until they were tested in big studies that sometimes revealed risks instead of benefits.

In October, the government stopped a big study of vitamin E and selenium pills for prostate cancer prevention after seeing no evidence of benefit and hints of harm.

Vitamin D is one of the last major nutrients to be put to a rigorous test.

For years, evidence has been building that many people are deficient in "the sunshine vitamin." It is tough to get enough from dietary sources like milk and oily fish. Cancer rates are higher in many northern regions where sunlight is weak in the winter, and some studies have found that people with lower blood levels of vitamin D are more likely to develop cancer.

Fish oil, or omega-3 fatty acid, is widely recommended for heart health. However, studies of it so far have mostly involved people who already have heart problems or who eat a lot of fish, such as in Japan. Foods also increasingly are fortified with omega-3, so it is important to establish its safety and benefit.

"Vitamin D and omega-3s have powerful anti-inflammatory effects that may be key factors in preventing many diseases. They may also work through other pathways that influence cancer and cardiovascular risk," Manson said.

However, getting nutrients from a pill is different than getting them from foods, and correcting a deficiency is not the same as healthy people taking large doses from a supplement.

The new study, which will start later this year, will enroll 20,000 people with no history of heart attacks, stroke or a major cancer — women 65 or older and men 60 or older. They will be randomly assigned to take vitamin D, fish oil, both nutrients or dummy pills for five years.

The daily dose of vitamin D will be about 2,000 international units of D-3, also known as cholecalciferol, the most active form. For fish oil, the daily dose will be about one gram — five to 10 times what the average American gets.

Participants' health will be monitored through questionnaires, medical records and in some cases, periodic in-person exams.

"We're hoping to see a result during the trial, that we won't have to wait five years" to find out if supplements help, Manson said.

Researchers also plan to study whether these nutrients help prevent memory loss, depression, diabetes, osteoporosis and other problems, Buring said.

The $20 million study will be sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, with the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and other federal agencies. Pharmavite LLC of Northridge, Calif., is providing the vitamin D pills, and Ocean Nutrition Canada Ltd. of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, is providing the omega-3 fish oil capsules.

On the Net:
Study information: http://www.vitalstudy.org

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap...5IxSPwD98VSLJG0
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  #85   ^
Old Mon, Jun-22-09, 15:55
Hutchinson's Avatar
Hutchinson Hutchinson is offline
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Plan: Dr Dahlqvist's
Stats: 205/152/160 Male 69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Demi
From Associated Press:
First
The VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL) is a research study in 20,000 U.S. men and women investigating whether taking daily dietary supplements of vitamin D (about 2000 IU) or fish oil (about 1 gram of omega-3 fatty acids) reduces the risk of developing cancer, heart disease, and stroke in people who do not have a prior history of these illnesses. Recruitment for the study will begin in January 2010.

I really don't understand why this is an either or situation.

It may be just because it's a trial and they want a simple answer but correcting both omega 3 and vitamin D status are anti inflammatory agents and both will work together to improve the situation.

While 2000iu will probably (if they use D3) be sufficient (particularly if participants also take the extra 800iu/d they are allowed) to make a difference in the USA, in the UK where we don't have fortified milk/cereals but we have more cloud and fewer days UVB annually, UK adults would need more to achieve the same 25(OH)D and probable benefits.

With regard to the section
In October, the government stopped a big study of vitamin E and selenium pills for prostate cancer prevention after seeing no evidence of benefit and hints of harm.
again UK readers should be aware we are in a totally different scenario. USA people live for the most part in with selenium rich soils and we don't.
Biofortification of UK food crops with selenium
Se is an essential element for animals. In man low dietary Se intakes are associated with health disorders including oxidative stress-related conditions, reduced fertility and immune functions and an increased risk of cancers. Although the reference nutrient intakes for adult females and males in the UK are 60 and 75 mg Se/d respectively, dietary Se intakes in the UK have declined from >60 mg Se/d in the 1970s to 35 mg Se/d in the 1990s, with a concomitant decline in human Se status. This decline in Se intake and status has been attributed primarily to the replacement of milling wheat having high levels of grain Se and grown on high-Se soils in North America with UK-sourced wheat having low levels of grain Se and grown on low-Se soils. Animmediate solution to low dietary Se intake and status is to enrich UK-grown food crops using Se fertilisers. Such a strategy has been adopted with success in Finland. It may also be possible to enrich food crops in the longer term by selecting or breeding crop varieties with enhanced Se-accumulation characteristics. The present paper will review the potential for biofortification of UK food crops with Se.

The research showed that low selenium levels were associated with increased Prostate cancer incidence and thus our low selenium levels still need correcting but in the USA giving extra selenium to people who already are getting more than enough aggravates certain gene variant prostate cancers and makes them worse. So both too little and too much selenium will increase PC but in the UK were we are all Selenium insuffiicient it's a different story.
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  #86   ^
Old Mon, Jun-22-09, 17:07
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
Posts: 16,629
 
Plan: Mishmash
Stats: 365/350.4/160 Female 67
BF:
Progress: 7%
Location: Maryland, US
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I received my vitamin D test results.

I need to either stop taking D for a while or go on minimum dose.

No problem with my calcium levels.

332.0 ng/mL

from LabCorp
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  #87   ^
Old Tue, Jun-23-09, 03:38
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 21,759
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 215/170/160 Female 5'10"
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Progress: 82%
Location: UK
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Talking of Vitamin D testing, there's a very interesting article in the FT today:


Quote:
IDS boosted by 'remarkable' vitamin D market

By John O'Doherty

Published: June 23 2009

The growing concern over vitamin D deficiency has boosted sales at Immunodiagnostic Systems, the maker of diagnostic kits, as it increased its dividend by 10 per cent and launched a new automatic diagnostic device.

"Vitamin D is a remarkable market at the moment and has been for the last couple of years," said Roger Duggan, chief executive of IDS.

"The demand for vitamin D testing in the US rose by 80 per cent to 90 per cent last year. In France, the market tripled over the past seven quarters.

It has been driven by publications that depict vitamin D as important in having a preventive effect on disease onset," he said.

"Colorectal cancer, breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, auto-immune diseases, high blood pressure . . . you name it, low vitamin D is bad news and that's what's driving the market."

IDS makes diagnostic kits for research laboratories and medical clinics. In addition to testing for vitamin deficiency, the group makes tests to determine patient susceptibility to kidney and bone disease.

At present, the manual kits are shipped to laboratories in small shoebox-sized packages containing test-tubes for about 40 different patient tests. IDS has also launched a new desk-top machine the size of a large office printer that can process about 1,000 patient samples a day.

For the full-year to March 31 pre-tax profit rose 27 per cent to £4.8m on revenues that rose 51 per cent to £24.9m. Earnings per share increased 21 per cent to 16.166p.

The company has proposed a final and total dividend of 1.65p.

Shares in IDS rose 3½p to close at 240p.

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/4480c48a-...?nclick_check=1
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  #88   ^
Old Tue, Jun-23-09, 03:51
Hutchinson's Avatar
Hutchinson Hutchinson is offline
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Posts: 2,886
 
Plan: Dr Dahlqvist's
Stats: 205/152/160 Male 69
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As we mentioned Swine flu earlier for UK readers benefit here is a link to what MAY be happening in your area.
Swine flu comes home: a GP’s tale 22 Jun, 09 | by Deborah Kirklin
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  #89   ^
Old Wed, Jun-24-09, 07:33
Jayppers's Avatar
Jayppers Jayppers is offline
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Posts: 651
 
Plan: Mostly carnivory
Stats: 145/145/145 Male 5'11'' (feet and inches)
BF:
Progress: -20%
Location: Ohio
Thumbs up Light Therapy

Hi, everyone.

Vitamin D has been a god send for me, but I still wasn't quite on top of energy and mood stability. There are/were still neurotransmitter imbalances that are/were really messing with my total body functioning (especially of autonomic processes like digestion, etc.) that D alone has not been sufficient in rectifying.

My mother purchased a Apollo Health goLITE P1 (with BLUEWAVE) for me a few years back and I've just gotten back into using it religiously every morning (and sometimes in the afternoon), even during this summer season where I've been getting adequate sunshine on most days. It has produced some pretty noticeable and favorable results in terms of increasing serotonin, helping to balance things overall, and aid in my sleep cycles and create for more restful sleep at night. I'm waking up on my own literally minutes before my alarm usually goes off - as if a built in clock has been established in my head. It's wonderful.

So, I just wanted to share that although obtaining adequate sunlight involves getting needed doses of vitamin D, it is only part of the whole sunlight's benefit on human health equation. So if you're still struggling while obtaining a nutrient-dense diet with plenty of D and all the other good stuff, don't hesitate to also investigate a little bright/blue light therapy.

Quote:
Vitamin D Council | Vitamin D Quotes

Natural sunlight's benefits are not limited to vitamin D production. As light enters the eyes, photoreceptors convert the light into nerve impulses that travel along the optic nerve to the brain. These impulses trigger the hypothalamus gland to send neurotransmitters to regulate the automatic functions of the body, such as blood pressure, body temperature, respiration, digestion, sexual function, moods, immune and hormonal modulation, and circadian rhythm. ~ John Maher, DC, DCCN, FAIIM.
Quote:
Direct brain serotonin measurement validates Light therapy for SAD

Results were clear. Serotonin levels in the brain plunged between June and August, corresponding to Australian winter; not so the other two neurotransmitters, nor the serotonin produced in the gut or spinal cord. Nor did serotonin levels reflect the other environmental conditions. Serotonin levels were higher on bright days no matter what the time of year, and the amount of serotonin present reflected the hours of sun exposure on a particular day – conditions the day before had no effect. This suggests that daily light therapy, which many people with SAD use, has a sound basis in biology. (The Lancet, Dec. 7, 2002, p. 1840)

Last edited by Jayppers : Wed, Jun-24-09 at 09:23.
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  #90   ^
Old Wed, Jun-24-09, 07:39
Jayppers's Avatar
Jayppers Jayppers is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 651
 
Plan: Mostly carnivory
Stats: 145/145/145 Male 5'11'' (feet and inches)
BF:
Progress: -20%
Location: Ohio
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Quote:
IDS boosted by 'remarkable' vitamin D market
Wow. I have a little money to throw around and have been meaning to put into investments... I can't believe I never thought of investigating vitamin D related products in the medical industry as a possible boom market. This really makes sense, and I'm going to investigate that further. Thanks for that post, as always, Demi.
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