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  #16   ^
Old Sat, May-30-09, 17:48
KellieNVIC KellieNVIC is offline
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Plan: Atkins
Stats: 135/129/110 Female 5 ft 4.5 inches
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Default what about tanning beds?

Please forgive me if this has already been covered...I'm very new here. What about tanning beds? Do they also produce vit D in the body?

I get a mixture...2-3 outdoor sessions in the sun/week and 2-3 tanning visits at the salon.
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  #17   ^
Old Sun, May-31-09, 02:05
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 21,754
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 215/170/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 82%
Location: UK
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KellieNVIC
Please forgive me if this has already been covered...I'm very new here. What about tanning beds? Do they also produce vit D in the body?

I get a mixture...2-3 outdoor sessions in the sun/week and 2-3 tanning visits at the salon.
As well as taking a daily D3 supplement of 5000iu, I supplement with sunbeds during the winter months and occasionally throughout the summer months too.

Advice from the Vitamin D Council:
Quote:
How To Get Enough Vitamin D

There are 3 ways for adults to insure adequate levels of vitamin D:
  • regularly receive midday sun exposure in the late spring, summer, and early fall, exposing as much of the skin as possible.
  • regularly use a sun bed (avoiding sunburn) during the colder months.
  • take 5,000 IU per day for three months, then obtain a 25-hydroxyvitamin D test. Adjust your dosage so that blood levels are between 50–80 ng/mL (or 125–200 nM/L) year-round.

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/
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  #18   ^
Old Sun, May-31-09, 02:19
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
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Plan: LCHF
Stats: 215/170/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 82%
Location: UK
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Have just come across this:


Quote:
From The Times
May 19, 2009

Schoolboy petitions MSPs over vitamin D link to MS

A Times investigation into the links between vitamin D deficiency and multiple sclerosis led a 14-year-old boy whose mother has the disease to petition Holyrood to provide a vitamin supplement to all children and pregnant women.

Ryan McLaughlin, from Glasgow, decided he had to do something after he read an exclusive report in The Times showing there was a direct interaction between vitamin D and a common genetic variant, which increased the possibility of MS being inherited.

His mother, Kirsten, 34, became ill with MS three years ago and earlier this year Ryan underwent tests after he showed symptoms of the disease.

His campaign, Shine on Scotland, has started an e-petition and has already won the backing of J.K. Rowling. “I am really honoured to support Ryan in his fantastic campaign,” the author said. “Ryan’s mother has MS as did my own mother. I only wish I had the gumption at 14 to do what Ryan is doing and get such an important issue raised in the Parliament.”

In addition to asking the Scottish government to provide vitamin D for children and pregnant women — in pills or in fortified milk or bread — Shine on Scotland is seeking clarification on the recommended daily allowance of the vitamin and a campaign to inform the public about its benefits in relation to MS.

The Times revealed in February that scientists at Oxford University had found what appears to be a genetic vulnerability to MS, apparently initiated by a lack of vitamin D. The World Health Organisation said that vitamin D supplements should be tested in Scotland “sooner rather than later”.

Ryan, who like his mother is a Taekwondo champion, said: “If everyone supports us by signing the e-petition, I am confident that we can bring about real change for future generations and help to prevent thousands of new cases of MS.”

Ryan’s father, Alan, 34, said that the family had been planning to move to Australia when his wife fell ill. She suffered nine relapses in 13 months and at one point could barely walk. Emigration became impossible but while on a holiday to Australia, Mrs McLaughlin’s health improved in the sunshine.

The family read the report in The Times linking vitamin D deficiency to the high incidence of MS and contacted Professor George Ebers at the University of Oxford, who forwarded them his research findings. Mr McLaughlin said: “Ryan and I sat and studied it. At the time he was waiting for tests for MS, because he was having trouble with his eyes and with spasms.

"He’d been watching J. K. Rowling being interviewed about her mother and he said to me, ‘Dad, you know the line in the film Braveheart about how you have just one chance to make a difference — well, I want to do something about MS so that people in future don’t have to suffer like Mum does every day’.”

The family gathered support from various charities and four weeks ago began their campaign. Ryan, who was found to be clear of MS after an MRI scan, made a poignant YouTube video and the e-petition was started.

Ryan has received messages of support from Nicola Sturgeon, the Scottish Health Secretary, and Kathleen McDermott, the Bafta Award-winning actress.

On June 16, he will lead 500 children on a march to the Scottish Parliament to lodge his petition.

For more information visit www.shineonscotland.org.uk


I think that I may have mentioned this here before, but my son had a friend who was diagnosed with MS at the age of 17. As they were growing up, while all the other kids were playing outside, he was always the one who was inside playing computer games. If he did venture out, his mother insisted on him being covered in total sun block.
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  #19   ^
Old Sun, May-31-09, 08:33
bike2work bike2work is offline
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Posts: 4,534
 
Plan: Fung-inspired fasting
Stats: 336/000/160 Female 5' 9"
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Location: Seattle metro area
Default Low vitamin D levels may impair thinking

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20090529...pair_thinking_1

Quote:
Low vitamin D levels may impair thinking

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – New research suggests that low vitamin D levels in the body are associated with thinking or "cognitive" impairments in older men, but whether vitamin D supplements can help is not yet known.

In the study, an investigation of European men, subjects with low levels of vitamin D scored worse on a standard test of cognitive ability than did their peers with normal levels, Dr. David M. Lee, from the University of Manchester, UK, and co-researchers found. Although, the authors emphasize, the difference in scores was not that great.

Included in the investigation were 3133 men, 40 to 79 years of age, who were enrolled in the European Male Aging Study (EMAS). The average level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, an inactive form of vitamin D used to measure levels of the vitamin, was 63 nanomoles per liter. Levels of 90 to 140 nanomoles per liter are typically considered optimal.

The researchers report their findings report in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry.

As vitamin D levels fell, so did cognitive performance. Further analysis indicated that this relationship was largely confined to men over age 60 and was strongest with vitamin D levels below 35 nanomoles per liter.

While the magnitude of the association was small, Lee and colleagues note, if a simple measure, such as vitamin D supplementation, could improve cognition, then the findings could have important public health implications.


SOURCE: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, May 21, 2009 online issue.
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  #20   ^
Old Sun, May-31-09, 15:04
bike2work bike2work is offline
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Posts: 4,534
 
Plan: Fung-inspired fasting
Stats: 336/000/160 Female 5' 9"
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Progress: 191%
Location: Seattle metro area
Default Low vitamin D tied to infection during pregnancy

Low vitamin D tied to infection during pregnancy

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Pregnant women who are deficient in vitamin D may be at increased risk for developing bacterial vaginosis, a vaginal infection that may have harmful effects on the pregnancy, according to a report in The Journal of Nutrition.

Bacterial vaginosis is caused by an imbalance of the bacteria normally found in a woman's vagina, which is upset by an overgrowth of bacteria not usually present. It is the most common vaginal infection in women of child-bearing age. Symptoms include discharge, odor, pain, itching and burning.

When present during pregnancy, bacterial vaginosis is known to increase the chances of preterm delivery.

Dr. Lisa M. Bodnar from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pennsylvania, and colleagues examined the association between vitamin D status and bacterial vaginosis in the first trimester of pregnancy in 469 women.

The team found that 41 percent of the women had bacterial vaginosis, and 52 percent had low levels of vitamin D. Further analysis showed that vitamin D levels were lower in women with bacterial vaginosis than in those without the infection.

The researchers found that low vitamin D levels were linked to bacterial vaginosis in black women, but not in white women. However, this may simply be because relatively few white women were included in the study.

"Our findings suggest that vitamin D deficiency is associated with bacterial vaginosis at less than 16 weeks of pregnancy," the authors conclude. If the findings are confirmed in other studies, they add, vitamin D deficiency may partially account for the racial differences seen in rates of bacterial vaginosis and in other pregnancy complications.

SOURCE: Journal of Nutrition, April 8, 2009.
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  #21   ^
Old Sun, May-31-09, 15:05
bike2work bike2work is offline
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Posts: 4,534
 
Plan: Fung-inspired fasting
Stats: 336/000/160 Female 5' 9"
BF:
Progress: 191%
Location: Seattle metro area
Default Vitamin D may help prevent knee osteoarthritis

Vitamin D may help prevent knee osteoarthritis

By Joene Hendry Joene Hendry – Fri May 29, 12:53 pm ET

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Low levels of vitamin D are associated with the loss of cartilage in the knee joint of older individuals, researchers in Australia report.

"Cartilage loss is the hallmark of osteoarthritis," Dr. Changhai Ding told Reuters Health. By the time patients reach the point of needing knee replacement, 60 percent of cartilage has been lost, he said.

However, "achieving vitamin D sufficiency in osteoarthritis patients could significantly delay total knee replacement," said Ding, at the Menzies Research Institute in Tasmania.

In a study, Ding and colleagues found "osteoarthritis patients with vitamin D sufficiency have approximately 1.5 percent less loss of knee cartilage per year than patients with vitamin D deficiency," said Ding.

The investigators measured levels of vitamin D in blood samples and knee cartilage volume on X-rays from 880 men and women who were 51 to 79 years old. The team then took similar measurements again almost 3 years later among 353 of the study participants, the researchers report in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Overall, 58 percent of these subjects showed changes in knee cartilage indicating worsening osteoarthritis between the first and second measurements, and half reported knee pain.

Both at the beginning of the study enrollment and at follow up, men and women with vitamin D deficiency had lower knee cartilage volume and were more likely to experience knee pain.

Ding's team concludes that vitamin D plays an important role in cartilage changes, and that vitamin D deficiency may predict knee cartilage loss over time.

The researchers call for further research to see if vitamin D supplementation can delay the progression of knee osteoarthritis and the need for total knee replacement in osteoarthritis patients.

SOURCE: Arthritis & Rheumatism, May 2009
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  #22   ^
Old Sun, May-31-09, 18:32
nawchem's Avatar
nawchem nawchem is offline
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Plan: atkins
Stats: 181.5/177.5/170 Female 62
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I have been a sun worshiper my whole life and living in california it was year round. In november of last year I fell 12 ft onto concrete and banged my heel. The only injury is a squished tendon. Every dr I've seen has been shocked at how lucky I am. I was told 98% would have a broken foot and 30%broken spine. A man from my church fell 12 ft onto dirt and is a quadrapeligic. I credit all that vit D for my luck!

Now a question
I just got some sugarfree almond milk that says 25%rda of vit D (only 2 carbs). Do you think this is a good source for vitD? Is it enough. I love to sun and read a bit everyday and always have deep tan. When not injured I hike and play tennis too.
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  #23   ^
Old Mon, Jun-01-09, 00:40
TejanaCJ's Avatar
TejanaCJ TejanaCJ is offline
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Posts: 273
 
Plan: High fat LC
Stats: 437/349/134 Female 5 ft. 5 in.
BF:Next/Goal/350
Progress: 29%
Location: Live Oak, Texas
Default Test results question

I posted my 25-hydroxyvitamin D test results a while back as part of the GrassRoots Health program. The result was 98 (two years earlier it had been 7). That increase was from supplementing 14,000 IU daily. Now I am taking 8000 IU on even-numbered days and 10,000 IU on odd-numbered days, so see how I maintain.

Question is: If normal range on test is listed as 32 to 100 and "between 50–80 ng/mL (or 125–200 nM/L) year-round" quoting post below is optimal then what is the 80 to 100 range? Should I try to get my level down to a maximum of 80? And if that is so, why?

Thanks.
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  #24   ^
Old Mon, Jun-01-09, 09:13
capmikee's Avatar
capmikee capmikee is offline
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Posts: 5,160
 
Plan: Weston A. Price, GFCF
Stats: 165/133/132 Male 5' 5"
BF:?/12.7%/?
Progress: 97%
Location: Philadelphia
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nawchem
Now a question
I just got some sugarfree almond milk that says 25%rda of vit D (only 2 carbs). Do you think this is a good source for vitD? Is it enough. I love to sun and read a bit everyday and always have deep tan. When not injured I hike and play tennis too.

Most D-fortified foods have D2 added. As far as I know, this is completely useless, but I'm far from the expert here. Anyone else?
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  #25   ^
Old Mon, Jun-01-09, 09:57
nawchem's Avatar
nawchem nawchem is offline
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Posts: 7,587
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 181.5/177.5/170 Female 62
BF:
Progress: 35%
Default

Thx capmikee will check and see if they specify which D. I didn't think of that when I bought it.
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  #26   ^
Old Mon, Jun-01-09, 11:07
Hutchinson's Avatar
Hutchinson Hutchinson is offline
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Plan: Dr Dahlqvist's
Stats: 205/152/160 Male 69
BF:
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nawchem
INow a question
I just got some sugarfree almond milk that says 25%rda of vit D (only 2 carbs). Do you think this is a good source for vitD? Is it enough. I love to sun and read a bit everyday and always have deep tan. When not injured I hike and play tennis too.
ABSOLUTELY NOT the RDA is RIDICULOUS. so 25% of the RDA is simply insignificant. You need a proper D3 supplement depending on the latitude you live at and the amount of time you're outdoors.
Most people Dr Davis Heartscanblog treats in Wisconsin require in the region of 5000~6000iu but because there is a big variation 25(OH)D testing after 3 months is sensible to check how that works for you.
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  #27   ^
Old Mon, Jun-01-09, 11:23
Demi's Avatar
Demi Demi is offline
Posts: 21,754
 
Plan: LCHF
Stats: 215/170/160 Female 5'10"
BF:
Progress: 82%
Location: UK
Default

June 2009 Issue of International Health News

THIS MONTH'S TOPICS


Huge increase in cancer predicted
Trans-fatty acids and colorectal cancer
UV light, vitamin D and malignant melanoma
Lifestyle and risk of pancreatic cancer
Brave new world of the Polypill
Lifestyle risk factors and type 2 diabetes in older adults
Health and the honey bee
Power lines and neurodegenerative disease
Impact of vitamin D deficiency on adolescent health
Modest wine consumption yields 5-year increase in life expectancy
Conflicts of interest - Finally becoming a high profile issue

To access, please click here: http://www.yourhealthbase.com/ihn198su.pdf
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  #28   ^
Old Mon, Jun-01-09, 13:31
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
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Plan: Mishmash
Stats: 365/350.4/160 Female 67
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Progress: 7%
Location: Maryland, US
Default

The kind of vitamin D put in milk in the US is D3. So I would assume they put the same kind in soy and almond milk.

It's not the kind of vitamin D they put in milk that's the problem; it's that the amount put in milk is insignificant.
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  #29   ^
Old Mon, Jun-01-09, 22:12
capmikee's Avatar
capmikee capmikee is offline
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Plan: Weston A. Price, GFCF
Stats: 165/133/132 Male 5' 5"
BF:?/12.7%/?
Progress: 97%
Location: Philadelphia
Default

I must have been looking at the vegetarian products - I saw some soy milk and "coconut milk beverage" that had D2 added.
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  #30   ^
Old Tue, Jun-02-09, 06:06
Zuleikaa Zuleikaa is offline
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Plan: Mishmash
Stats: 365/350.4/160 Female 67
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Progress: 7%
Location: Maryland, US
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by capmikee
I must have been looking at the vegetarian products - I saw some soy milk and "coconut milk beverage" that had D2 added.
Products for the vegetarian market contain D2; D3 has an animal source.
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