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  #46   ^
Old Tue, Jun-12-18, 11:51
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 6,260
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/229/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 19%
Location: Massachusetts
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WHich are the microbes in kefir??

I did try making keifr with grains sent by a friend. I had far too much and could not keep up with mananging a quart a day.

Would like to try again though.
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  #47   ^
Old Tue, Jun-12-18, 11:54
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 6,260
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/229/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 19%
Location: Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
Kefir is good and I made it for about 6 months from grains, very good grains. I used whole A2 milk, and it came out creamy, tangy and very rich. I stopped when I realized my gut was very healthy, and I was producing more kefir than I could consume. Given the amount of carbs and trying to stay in ketosis, I gave the grains to a friend and retired my kefir making efforts. If I ever have a reason to require antibiotics in the future, I would not hesitate to make kefir to rebalance my gut microbiome. It's far more fertile in good bacteria than anything store bought, especially yogurt. Easy to make, almost too easy!

Rob, Ive been trying to research A2 milk-- can you tell me what you know about it?

I could get goats but.....
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  #48   ^
Old Tue, Jun-12-18, 12:01
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
Experimenter
Posts: 45,240
 
Plan: Paleo 99.5%
Stats: 210/170/160 Female 67.5"
BF:
Progress: 80%
Location: San Diego, CA
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You can buy "water kefir" grains and use them to ferment things like coconut milk or other stuff. I imagine you can ferment cream with regular kefir grains. I love goat milk kefir. I get it at trader joe's or whole foods.
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  #49   ^
Old Tue, Jun-12-18, 12:20
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 6,260
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/229/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 19%
Location: Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nancy LC
You can buy "water kefir" grains and use them to ferment things like coconut milk or other stuff. I imagine you can ferment cream with regular kefir grains. I love goat milk kefir. I get it at trader joe's or whole foods.


Nancy, are you saying you can buy goat milk kefir from trader joes?
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  #50   ^
Old Tue, Jun-12-18, 22:21
mike_d's Avatar
mike_d mike_d is offline
Grease is the word!
Posts: 8,194
 
Plan: PSMF/IF
Stats: 236/181/180 Male 72 inches
BF:disappearing!
Progress: 98%
Location: Alamo city, Texas
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Commercial kefir is not the same as the real deal made at home -- it can't be, as the sealed containers would likely explode. It's more like yogurt. Same with the powdered starters, they soon die out like commercial strains you try to repeat culture. Even "Dan Active" is inactive. You can't use it to culture yogurt as it is not "Alive."
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  #51   ^
Old Tue, Jun-12-18, 23:16
Meme#1's Avatar
Meme#1 Meme#1 is offline
Posts: 8,621
 
Plan: Atkins DANDR
Stats: 210/183/160 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: 54%
Location: Texas
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That's true Mike, if the store bought Kefir were real it would explode. There is a sauerkraut that I buy from time to time called Bubbies, HEB and Sprouts sells it. It is supposed to be real fermented kraut but after reading their web-site they admit that they had to begin using heat when canning them in the jars because they were oozing out in the stores.
When you make Kefir the gas has to escape.
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  #52   ^
Old Wed, Jun-13-18, 07:18
mike_d's Avatar
mike_d mike_d is offline
Grease is the word!
Posts: 8,194
 
Plan: PSMF/IF
Stats: 236/181/180 Male 72 inches
BF:disappearing!
Progress: 98%
Location: Alamo city, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Meme#1
That's true Mike, if the store bought Kefir were real it would explode. There is a sauerkraut that I buy from time to time called Bubbies, HEB and Sprouts sells it. It is supposed to be real fermented kraut but after reading their web-site they admit that they had to begin using heat when canning them in the jars because they were oozing out in the stores.
When you make Kefir the gas has to escape.
Yeah, the other day I left a full jar of Kim Chi on the counter all day with the lid tight on it -- the metal lid bent up! Knew to open it in the bathroom sink, but it still sprayed everywhere

Ill look for that kraut if I ever get to HEB again and leave it out for a day to see

Last edited by mike_d : Wed, Jun-13-18 at 07:23.
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  #53   ^
Old Thu, Jun-14-18, 12:13
s93uv3h's Avatar
s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
 
Plan: Atkins & IF
Stats: 000/000/000 Male 5' 10"
BF:
Progress: 20%
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A watched kefir jar does not ferment...

I confused a video of a lady showing how to make kefir using cultures (cover with lid, do not tighten) with the powder culture starter kit instructions which say to close the lid tight. 18 hours in and nothing was happening. Tightened lid - see what happens! I like science experiments.

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  #54   ^
Old Fri, Jun-15-18, 06:29
s93uv3h's Avatar
s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
 
Plan: Atkins & IF
Stats: 000/000/000 Male 5' 10"
BF:
Progress: 20%
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Is the finished kefir (using a starter kit) suppose to be kind of thick? Or thicker than when starting?
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  #55   ^
Old Fri, Jun-15-18, 10:13
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
Posts: 2,156
 
Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
BF:
Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms Arielle
Rob, Ive been trying to research A2 milk-- can you tell me what you know about it?

I could get goats but.....

Ms Arielle - It's more prevalent in Europe and is available in the US in certain markets like Whole Foods or Mom's Organic. Due to the genetic makeup of A2 cows (and bulls), lactose intolerance disappears for many who consume this milk. Note that to be a certified A2 herd, father and mother must have been A2 as well. No mixture is allowed. I've noticed some farms near me in Virginia are touting their A2 herds, so it is becoming a good trend.

Here is a good source of detailed information about the benefits of A2:
http://www.originmilk.com/why-a2-milk/

For families with children, whole A2 milk is preferable to skim or low fat standard milk due to it's lack of inflammatory characteristics and for most, absence of lactose intolerance. Children need full fat and protein in their foods, so A2 is a good source.

Yes, there are sugars, just like in any milk, and they're listed as carbs on the label, but A2 is good for making kefir, and that's what I used when I was doing that. Fresh A2 is delicious, and tastes like the milk I remember as a kid when we'd get milk delivered to our house from a local farm.
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  #56   ^
Old Fri, Jun-15-18, 12:03
Ms Arielle's Avatar
Ms Arielle Ms Arielle is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 6,260
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 247/229/153 Female 5'8"
BF:
Progress: 19%
Location: Massachusetts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
Ms Arielle - It's more prevalent in Europe and is available in the US in certain markets like Whole Foods or Mom's Organic. Due to the genetic makeup of A2 cows (and bulls), lactose intolerance disappears for many who consume this milk. Note that to be a certified A2 herd, father and mother must have been A2 as well. No mixture is allowed. I've noticed some farms near me in Virginia are touting their A2 herds, so it is becoming a good trend.

Here is a good source of detailed information about the benefits of A2:
http://www.originmilk.com/why-a2-milk/

For families with children, whole A2 milk is preferable to skim or low fat standard milk due to it's lack of inflammatory characteristics and for most, absence of lactose intolerance. Children need full fat and protein in their foods, so A2 is a good source.

Yes, there are sugars, just like in any milk, and they're listed as carbs on the label, but A2 is good for making kefir, and that's what I used when I was doing that. Fresh A2 is delicious, and tastes like the milk I remember as a kid when we'd get milk delivered to our house from a local farm.



Thank you. I lept my kids on whole milk much to the horror of their pediatritian.

Looking up breeds and species thaat have the A2, or A1, is very interesting. Typical Holsteins, the mostly widely used in th US milk industry; it is the lesses known and rarely used Jersey and Guernsey that naturally have the preferred genes for the protein profile and the fat content. Particularly the Jersey for fat.

Basically commercialization of the milk industry reduced the number of Jersey and Guerneys which used to be popular. ANd goats. MOre families used to have goats.

Time to look for goat milk.
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  #57   ^
Old Fri, Jun-15-18, 15:23
s93uv3h's Avatar
s93uv3h s93uv3h is offline
 
Plan: Atkins & IF
Stats: 000/000/000 Male 5' 10"
BF:
Progress: 20%
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Time to try some kefir grains.

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  #58   ^
Old Fri, Jun-15-18, 21:08
mike_d's Avatar
mike_d mike_d is offline
Grease is the word!
Posts: 8,194
 
Plan: PSMF/IF
Stats: 236/181/180 Male 72 inches
BF:disappearing!
Progress: 98%
Location: Alamo city, Texas
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Jerseys are smaller, but their milk is richer. Their temperament is better too. Often crossed with beef breeds here.
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  #59   ^
Old Sat, Jun-16-18, 05:23
doreen T's Avatar
doreen T doreen T is offline
Forum Founder
Posts: 35,537
 
Plan: DANDR '92
Stats: 236/179/140 Female 165 cm
BF:
Progress: 59%
Location: Eastern ON, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s93uv3h
Is the finished kefir (using a starter kit) suppose to be kind of thick? Or thicker than when starting?

Yes. In fact, it will "solidify" as long as it's left undisturbed, but will liquify as soon as you stir or shake it. This is a sign that the powdered culture is very much alive and active, causing the protein bonds in the milk (casein) to form a curd. It's a good thing

Kefir made from powdered starter isn't "fake" . Here are some facts on the differences between powdered starter and the reusable grains :
Quote:
POWDERED KEFIR STARTER VS. KEFIR GRAINS: HOW THEY DIFFER

Bacteria Strains
Generally speaking, powdered kefir starter has 7 to 9 strains depending on the particular brand of starter. Milk kefir grains and water kefir grains contain a long list of bacteria and yeast strains and subspecies, making kefir grains the more probiotic-rich culture for making kefir.

Reusability
Kefir grains are reusable, and with proper care can be used indefinitely. Simply place the grains in the appropriate liquid, culture for 12-48 hours, then transfer the grains to new liquid for the new batch.

A small amount of the kefir made from powdered kefir starter can be reserved and added to fresh liquid to make a new batch of kefir. Generally it can be re-cultured several times before the bacteria weakens.


Culture Care
Kefir grains work best when cultured in back-to-back batches, as both water and milk kefir grains require a constant source of food. Although grains require a little more maintenance than a powedered kefir starter culture, they can be used to produce kefir on a daily basis.

Powdered kefir starter is well suited for individuals who do not wish to make kefir regularly. However, as mentioned above, kefir starter can often be used a few times before the bacteria weaken significantly. For best results, we recommend using or re-culturing the starter within 7 days of the previous batch.

Cost
While kefir grains are more costly upfront, kefir grains quickly become more economical, since they are reusable.


BOTTOM LINE
Kefir grains are the most traditional, economical, and nutrient-dense way to make kefir. However, it is not always practical to maintain kefir grains on a daily basis.

In situations where it is more practical to make kefir only periodically, we recommend opting for the powdered kefir starter.

https://www.culturesforhealth.com/l...wdered-culture/

By the way, powdered kefir starter can also be used with coconut milk, coconut water or fruit juice . It just won't be vegan because there's a trace of milk powder in the starter which acts as initial "food" for the bacteria until active fermentation gets underway.

Hope that helps
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  #60   ^
Old Sat, Jun-16-18, 07:45
Kristine's Avatar
Kristine Kristine is offline
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Posts: 18,574
 
Plan: Primal
Stats: 171/155/155 Female 5'7"
BF:
Progress: 100%
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
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Doreen (and other canucks) - I got nice kefir grains from a lady on kijiji. Maybe try that in your area?

I had to give up on kefir because I couldn't keep up with it. I ended up neglecting it and it started tasting funky. Maybe I should have frozen the grains.
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