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  #1   ^
Old Sun, Feb-27-05, 17:46
Karen's Avatar
Karen Karen is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic
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Default Atkins Induction Acceptable Food List

Note: These instructions are taken from Dr Atkins New Diet Revolution, 2002 edition. Most experienced forum members would advise you to follow these instructions and not those from New Atkins, New You, the Quick Start Guide, or the website, as the changes seem to be too liberal in favor of selling shakes and bars. This is the induction food list as Dr Atkins wrote it himself.

Atkins Induction Acceptable Food List

All fish, fowl, shellfish, meat, and eggs

Note: Oysters and mussels are higher in carbs than other shellfish, so limit them to four ounces per day.

Note: Processed meats, such as ham, bacon, pepperoni, salami, hot dogs and other luncheon meats—and some fish—may be cured with added sugar and will contribute carbs. Try to avoid meat and fish products cured with nitrates, which are known carcinogens. Also beware of products that are not exclusively meat, fish or fowl, such as imitation fish, meatloaf and breaded foods. Finally, do not consume more than four ounces of organ meats a day.

Cheese
You can consume three to four ounces daily of the following full-fat, firm, cow, sheep and goat cheese, soft and semisoft aged cheeses*, including:

Cheddar; cream cheese; Gouda; mozzarella; Roquefort, and other blue; Swiss cheese; Brie; Parmesan; Havarti; etc

*All cheeses have some carbohydrate content. The quantity you eat should be governed by that knowledge. The rule of thumb is to count 1 ounce of cheese as equivalent to 1 gram of carbohydrate. Note that cottage cheese, farmer’s cheese and other fresh cheeses are not permitted during Induction. No "diet" cheese, cheese spreads or whey cheeses are permitted. Individuals with known yeast symptoms, dairy allergy or cheese intolerance must avoid cheese. Imitation cheese products are not allowed, except for soy or rice cheese—but check the carbohydrate content.

Salad Vegetables
These salad vegetables are high in phytonutrients and provide a good source of fiber.

You can have two to three, cups per day of any combination of the following:

Alfalfa sprouts, daikon radish, mushrooms, arugula, endive, parsley, bok choy, escarole, peppers, celery, fennel, radicchio, chicory, jicama, radishes, chives, lettuce, romaine lettuce, cucumber, mâche, sorrel, spinach

Other Vegetables
You can have one cup per day of these vegetables, in any combination if your salad portion does not exceed two cups. The following vegetables are slightly higher in carbohydrate content than the salad vegetables:

Artichoke, celery root, pumpkin, artichoke hearts, rhubarb, asparagus, chard, sauerkraut, bamboo shoots, bean sprouts, beet greens, broccoli, broccoli rabe, Brussels sprouts, cabbage (red, green, Savoy), cauliflower, chayote, collard greens, dandelion greens, eggplant, hearts of palm, kale, kohlrabi, leeks, okra, onion, scallions, snow peas, spaghetti squash, spinach, string or wax beans, summer squash, tomato, turnips, water chestnuts, zucchini

If a vegetable, such as spinach or tomato, cooks down significantly, it must be measured raw so as not to underestimate its carb count.

Special Category Foods
To add variety, each day you can also eat 10 to 20 olives, half a small avocado, 2 Tbsp. of sour cream, or unsweetened heavy or light cream (limit to two to three tablespoons a day; note carbohydrate content), as well as two to three tablespoons of lemon juice or lime juice. But be aware that these foods occasionally slow down weight loss in some people, and may need to be avoided in the first two weeks. If you seem to be losing slowly, moderate your intake of these foods.

Herbs and Spices
Use all herbs and spices to taste, but make sure that spice blends contain no added sugar.

For salad dressing, use oil and vinegar (but not balsamic vinegar, which contains sugar) or lemon juice and herbs and spices. Prepared salad dressings without added sugar and no more than two carbs per serving are also fine.

Acceptable Fats and Oils
Many fats, especially certain oils, are essential to good nutrition. Olive oil is particularly valuable. All other vegetable oils are allowed, the best being canola, walnut, soybean, grapeseed, sesame, sunflower and safflower oils, especially if they are labeled "cold-pressed" or "expeller-pressed." Do not cook polyunsaturated oils, such as corn, soybean and sunflower oil, at high temperatures or allow to brown or smoke.

Use butter. Margarine should be avoided, not because of its carbohydrate content, but because it is usually made of trans fats (hydrogenated oils), which are a serious health hazard. (Some nonhydrogenated margarines are available in health-food stores.)

You don't have to remove the skin and fat from meat or fowl. Salmon and other cold-water fish are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids.

Remember that trying to do a low-fat version of the Atkins Nutritional ApproachTM will interfere with fat burning and derail your weight loss.

Artificial Sweeteners
You must determine which artificial sweeteners agree with you, but the following are allowed: sucralose (marketed as Splenda™), saccharin, cyclamate and acesulfame-K. Natural sweeteners ending in the suffix "-ose," such as maltose, fructose, etc., should be avoided. However, certain sugar alcohols, such as maltitol, do not affect blood sugar and are acceptable.

Saccharin has been extensively studied, and harmful effects were produced in the lab when fed to rats only in extremely high doses. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has removed saccharin from its list of carcinogens, basing its decision upon a thorough review of the medical literature and the National Institute of Science’s statement that there is "no clear association between saccharin and human cancer." It can be safely consumed in moderation, meaning no more than three packets a day. Saccharin is marketed as Sweet'n Low™.

The Atkins preference, however, is sucralose (Splenda™), the only sweetener made from sugar. Sucralose is safe, noncaloric and does not raise blood sugar. It has been used in Canada for years, and the FDA recently approved it after reviewing more than 100 studies conducted over the past 20 years. Note that each packet of sugar substitute contains about 1 gram of carbohydrate, so don’t forget to include the amount in your daily totals.

Acceptable Beverages
Be sure to drink a minimum of eight eight-ounce glasses of water each day, including: filtered water, mineral water, spring water, and tap water

Additionally, you can have the following:

Clear broth/bouillon (not all brands; read the label)
Club soda
Decaffeinated coffee or tea*
Diet soda made with sucralose (Splenda™); be sure to count the carbs
Essence-flavored seltzer (must say "no calories")
Herb tea (without barley or any fruit sugar added)
Lemon juice or lime juice (note that each contains 1.4 grams carbohydrate per Tablespoon); limit to two to three tablespoons

*Excessive caffeine may cause unstable blood sugar and should be avoided by those who suspect they are caffeine dependent. Everyone should try to avoid caffeine. Grain beverages (coffee substitutes) are not allowed. Alcoholic beverages are also not permitted during Induction; those low in carbohydrates are an option, in moderation, in later phases.

Convenience Foods
Although it is important that you eat primarily unprocessed foods, some controlled carb food products can come in handy when you are unable to find appropriate food, can’t take time for a meal or need a quick snack. More and more companies are creating healthy food products that can be eaten during the Induction phase of Atkins. Just remember two things:

Not all convenience food products are the same, so check labels and carbohydrate content.

While any of these foods can make doing Atkins easier, don’t overdo it. Remember, you must always follow The Rules of Induction.

Last edited by Kristine : Thu, Feb-24-11 at 07:16. Reason: Update
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  #2   ^
Old Thu, Jan-28-10, 08:48
digicode digicode is offline
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Plan: None
Stats: 174/171/140 Female 5'4"
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Is Stevia (liquid) allowed on the Atkins plan??
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  #3   ^
Old Thu, Jan-28-10, 10:59
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katmeyster katmeyster is offline
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Posts: 918
 
Plan: Keto (LCHFMP) + IF
Stats: 265/188/150 Female 61 inches
BF:Highest weight 290
Progress: 67%
Location: Las Cruces, New Mexico
Default

Thanks for posting the list. I have the book, and I printed it out from the website, but I still want to re-read this just about every day on induction (how ever long that lasts).

It would also be helpful to post the ladder of foods to add each week on OWL.

Thanks again.
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  #4   ^
Old Fri, Feb-12-10, 15:03
Badcarbs Badcarbs is offline
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Posts: 6
 
Plan: ATKINS
Stats: 290/259/190 Male 5ft 11inches
BF:
Progress: 31%
Location: uk
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Just started atkins , and am in the induction phase , what i dont understand is all this talk of processed food etc etc . If carbs are all that matter then what diff does it make ? If i am aiming below 20g of carbs a day what does it matter what i eat aslong its below that level .....

For example i have salami in the fridge the pack is 250 gram total and has 1gram of carb per 100 grams so the whole pack is only 2.5 carbs , why does it matter if its processed ?

Also what is this flu phase everyone goes on about it but doesnt explain what it is in any clear definition ???
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  #5   ^
Old Fri, Feb-12-10, 16:36
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Elizellen Elizellen is online now
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Posts: 10,733
 
Plan: Atkins (DANDR)
Stats: 290/141/130 Female 65.5 inches
BF:
Progress: 93%
Location: Bournemouth (UK)
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The problem with some processed foods is that even if they are fairly low carb they might be made with ingredients that are not on the allowed list or that tend to affect some people's losing progress (like too much salt)
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  #6   ^
Old Mon, Feb-15-10, 15:15
Dzg333's Avatar
Dzg333 Dzg333 is offline
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Posts: 21
 
Plan: Modified Atkins
Stats: 251/239/215 Male 6ft 1in
BF:
Progress: 33%
Location: Chicago
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Induction phase IS TOUGH! I'm on day 3 and doing very well but man do the cravings ever end.......
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  #7   ^
Old Wed, Feb-17-10, 10:11
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Selahgal Selahgal is offline
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Posts: 17
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 247.5/242.5/140 Female 64
BF:
Progress: 5%
Location: Indiana
Default

I have been on Induction for over a month now and cannot find the answer to this question, even in the book.

Why no milk? Is it the lactose? Or what?



Marci
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  #8   ^
Old Wed, Feb-17-10, 11:02
black57 black57 is offline
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Plan: atkins/intermit. fasting
Stats: 166/136/135 Female 5'3''
BF:
Progress: 97%
Location: Orange, California
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The problem with processed meat is that it might be cured with sugar. Although it may be a small amount, it can trigger cravings, especially for people who are new to low carbing. Remember the purpose of the induction phase is to conquer those cravings. While on induction, my problem with processed meat was that I normally ate it as a sandwich. Being new to this made it difficult for me to eat bologna without wanting a slice or two of wonderbread. I did eat bacon and sausage however with no problems.
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  #9   ^
Old Wed, Feb-17-10, 11:08
black57 black57 is offline
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Posts: 11,822
 
Plan: atkins/intermit. fasting
Stats: 166/136/135 Female 5'3''
BF:
Progress: 97%
Location: Orange, California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selahgal
I have been on Induction for over a month now and cannot find the answer to this question, even in the book.

Why no milk? Is it the lactose? Or what?



Marci


Yes, it's the lactose ( milk sugar ). Half and half or heavy whipping cream can be used instead although they too have small amount of sugar. You must be the judge. Don't overdo it.
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  #10   ^
Old Fri, Feb-26-10, 19:07
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juju_khan juju_khan is offline
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Posts: 32
 
Plan: atkins
Stats: 217/210/145 Female 52
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thanks for posting!
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  #11   ^
Old Sat, Feb-27-10, 16:35
Wikireader's Avatar
Wikireader Wikireader is offline
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Posts: 59
 
Plan: Atkins Diet
Stats: 260/252/185 Male 6'1"
BF:
Progress: 11%
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Costco sells heavy whipped cream, and I think it says 0 sugar/carbs, but tons of calories, do we need to count those calories, or as long as it says 0 carbs, we can have a lot of it?
thank you

Quote:
Originally Posted by black57
Yes, it's the lactose ( milk sugar ). Half and half or heavy whipping cream can be used instead although they too have small amount of sugar. You must be the judge. Don't overdo it.
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  #12   ^
Old Sat, Feb-27-10, 16:45
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GlendaRC GlendaRC is offline
Posts: 8,787
 
Plan: Atkins maintenance
Stats: 170/120/130 Female 65 inches & shrinking
BF:
Progress: 125%
Location: Victoria, BC Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikireader
Costco sells heavy whipped cream, and I think it says 0 sugar/carbs, but tons of calories, do we need to count those calories, or as long as it says 0 carbs, we can have a lot of it?
thank you

Cream is limited to two or three tablespoons per day until you reach the dairy rung.
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  #13   ^
Old Sat, Feb-27-10, 16:51
Wikireader's Avatar
Wikireader Wikireader is offline
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Posts: 59
 
Plan: Atkins Diet
Stats: 260/252/185 Male 6'1"
BF:
Progress: 11%
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Thank you
Quote:
Originally Posted by glendarc
Cream is limited to two or three tablespoons per day until you reach the dairy rung.
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  #14   ^
Old Sat, Feb-27-10, 18:58
Elizellen's Avatar
Elizellen Elizellen is online now
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Posts: 10,733
 
Plan: Atkins (DANDR)
Stats: 290/141/130 Female 65.5 inches
BF:
Progress: 93%
Location: Bournemouth (UK)
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Remember that in USA they are allowed to claim zero carbs per serving if it is less than 0.5 carbs. So if one serving = 1 tablespoon and is for examle 0.4 carbs then 3 servings would be 1.2 carbs!

The double cream I buy in UK has 2.6 g carbs per 3.4 fluid ounces (nearly 7 tablespoons) so has 0.37 carbs per tablespoon.
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  #15   ^
Old Fri, Mar-12-10, 14:23
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Yesurbius Yesurbius is offline
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Posts: 125
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 275/285/165 Male 180cm
BF:
Progress: -9%
Location: Edmonton, AB Canada
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What's up with Spinach?

Says you can have 2-3 cups of spinach ... then in the next paragraph it says you can have only one cup, if your other two cups don't exceed 2 cups

Basically its in both lists.

Any difference between Baby Spinach and normal horrible-tasting spinach?
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