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  #61   ^
Old Mon, Dec-05-05, 15:03
Lauri T. Lauri T. is offline
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Posts: 35
 
Plan: Atkins/Neanderthin
Stats: 244/198/150 Female 5'7"
BF:
Progress: 49%
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newdawnfad
You can't totally eliminate food groups.... have you heard of Rickets Scurvy and Beriberi? Those are diseases of certain vitamin defficiencies primarily found in fruit....



I am glad that you found what works for you. But people who need to be on a low-carb plan can do just fine without fruit. The overabundance of sugar in fruit can provoke symptoms, not to mention weight gain, in many women.

Rickets is a deficiency of vitamin D. Luckily fish, liver, eggs, and cheese are good sources of vitamin D.

Scurvy is a deficiency of vitamin C. Low-carbers can eat tomatoes, leafy green vegetables (plus many other vegetables including onions), shellfish, and liver to get plenty of vitamin C.

Beriberi is a deficiency of vitamin B1. People can eat beans, meat, and most vegetables to get this.

So fruit is a convenient way to get a few vitamins, but by no means is it necessary or even superior. For people who are very IR, the huge amount of sugar in most fruit cancels out any benefits of the vitamins, especially considering that the vitamins can be obtained from many other foods. I prefer a good-sized helping of broccoli to an orange, which has more vitamin C than the orange, and more additional nutrients besides.

Check Fitday. One large stalk of broccoli has 348% of the RDA for vitamin C. One cup of raw orange has 160%.

An orange has only 5% RDA of vitamin B-6, while broccoli has 20%. Also, an orange only has 1.69 grams of protein, while broccoli has 8.34 grams. I might also add that these values are based on boiled broccoli, which actually has less nutrients than broccoli eaten raw.
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  #62   ^
Old Tue, Dec-06-05, 05:59
newdawnfad newdawnfad is offline
New Member
Posts: 13
 
Plan: FOOD combining with LC
Stats: -/-/140 Female 5'2''
BF:
Progress:
Default re vitamin defficiencies...

Unfortunately it's not that simple (in response to message below). There are a myriad of PHYTOnutrients -some of which we have not even discovered yet that we need in our diets. Many of these work in conjunction with other nutrients found in the same foods - they work in tandem.

There are fruits you can safely get by with eating... berries ie blueberries, blackberries that are high in fiber. apples are excellent for PCOSers bcse it helps clear the gallbladder and liver.

We used to eat meat (poultry, cow, deer, pig) that fed on GRASS. They now predominantly feed on GRAIN... thus making them fatter and .. here's the crux, stay with me... they have no traces of the nutrients they are supposed to have in them that they used to when they ate grass. Now these nutrients are ones that help in blood sugar stabilisation.

Is there any coincidence that Diabetes is a very LUCRATIVE business to both drug companies and the medical establishment? hahahahahah
Whole grain has tons of chromium... as does non-depleted soil. Most PCOSers are chromium defficient.

Also, I agree that strenuous exercise for some women raises testosterone. Ballet, pilates, low impact arobics, walking at a clip but not pushing yourself too much, are all great for you. Don't push yourself to the limit.

But remember that we can't boil the contents of food down into a formula.
We don't know everything that's in there or what it does. you need to be in touch with your body's reaction and increase fiber which slows down absorption of whatever you eat.

GOod luck everyone!

---------------
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lauri T.
I am glad that you found what works for you. But people who need to be on a low-carb plan can do just fine without fruit. The overabundance of sugar in fruit can provoke symptoms, not to mention weight gain, in many women.

Rickets is a deficiency of vitamin D. Luckily fish, liver, eggs, and cheese are good sources of vitamin D.

Scurvy is a deficiency of vitamin C. Low-carbers can eat tomatoes, leafy green vegetables (plus many other vegetables including onions), shellfish, and liver to get plenty of vitamin C.

Beriberi is a deficiency of vitamin B1. People can eat beans, meat, and most vegetables to get this.

So fruit is a convenient way to get a few vitamins, but by no means is it necessary or even superior. For people who are very IR, the huge amount of sugar in most fruit cancels out any benefits of the vitamins, especially considering that the vitamins can be obtained from many other foods. I prefer a good-sized helping of broccoli to an orange, which has more vitamin C than the orange, and more additional nutrients besides.

Check Fitday. One large stalk of broccoli has 348% of the RDA for vitamin C. One cup of raw orange has 160%.

An orange has only 5% RDA of vitamin B-6, while broccoli has 20%. Also, an orange only has 1.69 grams of protein, while broccoli has 8.34 grams. I might also add that these values are based on boiled broccoli, which actually has less nutrients than broccoli eaten raw.
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  #63   ^
Old Tue, Dec-20-05, 16:54
jennlee's Avatar
jennlee jennlee is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 895
 
Plan: My Own Evil Plan
Stats: 260.0/250/130 Female 5'6
BF:
Progress: 8%
Location: Oregon
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Hiya SweetT,

I just wanted to say hang in there. PCOS treatment is often a long process of learning what works for YOUR body. It took me over a year to get the medication dose and diet that work best for me. Donít be afraid to let your doctor know when something is not working for you, and demand changes. Use them as a tool to help you get better. Best of wishes and health to you.
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