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  #76   ^
Old Fri, Dec-10-04, 14:39
cbcb's Avatar
cbcb cbcb is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 791
 
Plan: South Beach-esque
Stats: 194/159/140 Female 5'3"
BF:34% / 28% / 20%
Progress: 65%
Default

What a pleasant thread to have woken up to earlier this morning after a - rare - 11.5 hours of sleep! (Am I thin yet???!)

Okay, it was catch-up sleep, but still counts...
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  #77   ^
Old Fri, Dec-10-04, 16:46
LOOPS's Avatar
LOOPS LOOPS is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 3,091
 
Plan: simple HFLC <30g
Stats: 74/72/62 Female 5ft 6.5 inches
BF:29%/27%/24%
Progress: 17%
Location: LA SERENA, CHILE
Default sleep

I've been following this thread and everything seems to ring true about sleep and darkness. Since being married to an astronomer, and thus needing to sleep all sorts of hours, we've had blackout curtains fixed, which cut out around 95% of the light, even when it's sunny outside. Now I can't say I go to bed early, as I wouldn't see my hubby at all, but I can say that I sleep A LOT more with them.

Light is crucial - even if there is a bit in the mornings, I wake up. It's a nightmare when I go to visit England in their Summer (our Winter), as I get put in this room with peach curtains which let in all the light, and the sun comes up at like 5.30am. Aaaargh. Nobody else seems to be affected by this like me. Hubby just sleeps through everything, including hangovers (no such luck for me) Runs in the family though. My brother once started attatching binliners to the curtains at uni whilst doing exams because he just couldn't sleep enough.

I once went to visit a huge long cave in Hawaii. Most bizarre thing happened. We got most of the way down, and it was pitch black, only the sound of dripping water, sat down to appreciate the stillness and quietness, and I promptly fell asleep! Apparently I was out for about 5 minutes when hubby awoke me to go back out. It was soooooo dark and quiet and cool I just conked. Since then I have been convinced I need total and utter darkness and quiet to sleep my best.

I also found natural sounds help me to sleep (water, people, dogs even), but sounds of cars /traffic drives me nuts. The sea is the best - I have been known to conquer ongoing chronic insomnia just sleeping right next to the sea with no other sounds.

Also, we have regular blackouts here as the electricity is not so hot in Chile. When they have ocurred in the evening, I am falling asleep much earlier. I also feel much calmer. Even candlelight seems to produce this effect. I am sure this is to do with melatonin production.

I haven't read that book, but I really want to after all the raves - it sounds very interesting.

Loops
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  #78   ^
Old Fri, Dec-10-04, 18:06
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
Experimenter
Posts: 45,211
 
Plan: Paleo 99.5%
Stats: 210/170/160 Female 67.5"
BF:
Progress: 80%
Location: San Diego, CA
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I found the science news article really interesting about the people who experience "fear sleep". That is so not me. I've got the most finicky sleep mechanism ever. However I found out something odd... if I watch a DvD I've seen before, I tend to fall asleep rather quickly. So I exploit that fact by having a DvD beside my bed and the TV on a sleep timer. So I start out running my movie and falling asleep and then the TV cuts out eventually. Works great most of the time, still there are times when even that doesn't work.

Also, I've always been a late night person but I decided to start getting up earlier and now I'm hoping out of bed at 5-5:30 in the morning and going to bed around 8-8:30. The schedule change seems to agree with me.

I'm another person who must sleep in the dark. I'm super sensitive to the light. So when I moved into this house with cut out half circle windows the first thing I did was figure out how to shut the light out of them! My bedroom is very much like a dark cave.
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  #79   ^
Old Fri, Dec-10-04, 19:02
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jessica020 jessica020 is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 65
 
Plan: my own
Stats: 124/126.5/110 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: -18%
Location: United States
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I'm getting this book next time I go to the library, it sounds very interesting. I have horrible sleeping habits
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  #80   ^
Old Sun, Dec-12-04, 16:18
Gooserider's Avatar
Gooserider Gooserider is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 108
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 226/187/160 Male 5'9"
BF:More/ than I /like
Progress: 59%
Location: N. Billerica, MA, USA
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The book sounds fascinating, but I have one problem from the summaries people have posted so far. In short, the argument goes that we evolved to follow a changing seasonal light schedule, but as I understand my evolutionary history, man evolved in the tropics, where there is little seasonal change. Something doesn't seem to compute?

Gooserider
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  #81   ^
Old Sun, Dec-12-04, 19:56
MichaelG MichaelG is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 266
 
Plan: paleo
Stats: 209/189/176 Male 186cm
BF:
Progress: 61%
Location: Bribie Island, Australia
Default

You may be on to something there, Gooserider. If you take two very large and fairly culturally homogeneous countries such as Australia which extends from "North European" type lattitudes into the tropics, and the USA which just about extends into the tropics (does Florida extend south of the Tropic of Cancer? my geography is fuzzy on that) then there should be a range of sleep related disorders / health problems that can be evaluated or researched on depending on what latitude you live.
I wonder if there has ever been any research done.

Michael
Queensland
Australia
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  #82   ^
Old Mon, Dec-13-04, 21:50
Gooserider's Avatar
Gooserider Gooserider is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 108
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 226/187/160 Male 5'9"
BF:More/ than I /like
Progress: 59%
Location: N. Billerica, MA, USA
Default

As I recall, Florida and Texas are JUST north of the tropic region officially. But I agree there should be a variation. I seem to recall reading somewhere that there have been some studies done, and there are variations about as one would expect currently (however details escape me)

I'm more interested in how Wiley & Co. explain the variation if we supposedly evolved where it wouldn't have been as much of a factor. My science classes were a long time back, but I seem to recall there isn't supposed to be a significant variation in the day / night length in the tropics. There may have been a rainy season or some such that had similar effects, but presumably that would have had a different trigger.

Guess I'll need to get the book to find out

Gooserider
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  #83   ^
Old Tue, Dec-28-04, 20:18
Duparc's Avatar
Duparc Duparc is offline
New Member
Posts: 586
 
Plan: self-designed
Stats: 216/189/190 Male tad under 6'
BF:
Progress: 104%
Location: Kirriemuir, Scotland
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I guess I am about to be the odd-one-out here. I read the book a few months ago and it was interesting but I would hesitant to rate it higher. It is a worthy read and I have totally blackened the bedroom as the result but I have suspicion on what is said on the length of sleep. Around 7 hours is my maximum. If I go beyond that point I seem to fall into a second sleep and for the remainder of the day feel very tired indeed. If I arise between the 6th and 7th hour then I awaken refreshed and can continue throughout the day without napping. Darkening the bedroom entirely does appear to provide a more fulfilling sleep but to write a book to prove this point? It's a long story indeed!

Managed to resell it through Amazon.
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  #84   ^
Old Tue, Dec-28-04, 21:57
cbcb's Avatar
cbcb cbcb is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 791
 
Plan: South Beach-esque
Stats: 194/159/140 Female 5'3"
BF:34% / 28% / 20%
Progress: 65%
Default

So - I've probably asked this somewhere on this site before. But. Anybody else feel much better and have tons more energy when it starts raining or storms out?

What is that about? Can 'more negative ions' account for a pronounced effect?
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  #85   ^
Old Wed, Dec-29-04, 13:17
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Monique723 Monique723 is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 89
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 158/129/114 Female 60 inches
BF:
Progress: 66%
Location: Michigan
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I agree with Duparc. If I go beyond 8 to 8 1/2 hours I get a headache. I don't really see how every single human can be programmed for 9 hours or more.

I like the book though.
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  #86   ^
Old Wed, Dec-29-04, 23:35
Gooserider's Avatar
Gooserider Gooserider is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 108
 
Plan: Atkins
Stats: 226/187/160 Male 5'9"
BF:More/ than I /like
Progress: 59%
Location: N. Billerica, MA, USA
Default

I seem to recall hearing about some study done years back where they put volunteers in a closed environment with NOTHING that would give a time signal for about a month. The idea was to observe what they would do for sleep routines.

As I recollect the results showed that the subjects seemed to settle on an approx 25 - 26 hour per day cycle, including about 9 hours of sleep.

This sort of makes sense in terms of the way timing oscillators work in electronics, it is easier to make an oscillator that runs a little slower and use a feedback circuit to make it trip a little early each cycle than it is to make one that runs an exact frequency w/o feedback. In a human, the 'feedback trigger' would presumably come in the form of day/night changes.

It was an interesting concept and it seems sort of relevant to this.

Gooserider
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  #87   ^
Old Thu, Dec-30-04, 19:44
Duparc's Avatar
Duparc Duparc is offline
New Member
Posts: 586
 
Plan: self-designed
Stats: 216/189/190 Male tad under 6'
BF:
Progress: 104%
Location: Kirriemuir, Scotland
Default

Re CBCB's observation. Have to say that in this corner of the hubbub it rains so much that it's only when the sun shines that we feel good and more energised!
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  #88   ^
Old Thu, Dec-30-04, 20:19
cbcb's Avatar
cbcb cbcb is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 791
 
Plan: South Beach-esque
Stats: 194/159/140 Female 5'3"
BF:34% / 28% / 20%
Progress: 65%
Default

Well, I grew up in a hot, bright locale, so... !
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  #89   ^
Old Fri, Dec-31-04, 14:57
jessica020's Avatar
jessica020 jessica020 is offline
Registered Member
Posts: 65
 
Plan: my own
Stats: 124/126.5/110 Female 5'4"
BF:
Progress: -18%
Location: United States
Default

I finally got around to reading this yesterday, and I really enjoyed it. I don't understand why they would recommend eating soy, but other than that, I agree with most of it, and have been getting at least 9 hours of sleep every night for the past week or so. I have lots of energy during the day!
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  #90   ^
Old Fri, Jan-07-05, 07:10
LOOPS's Avatar
LOOPS LOOPS is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 3,091
 
Plan: simple HFLC <30g
Stats: 74/72/62 Female 5ft 6.5 inches
BF:29%/27%/24%
Progress: 17%
Location: LA SERENA, CHILE
Default

cbcb -

I have the same thing. I LOVE storms and rain. I am at my happiest when these happen. Unfortunately we moved to a very dry part of Chile and now it only rains twice a year! I really miss those storms.

Loops
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