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  #1   ^
Old Thu, Mar-06-03, 07:11
KoKo's Avatar
KoKo KoKo is offline
Stepford Malfunction
Posts: 25,926
 
Plan: FatFlush inspired
Stats: 143.5/132/130 Female 62.5 inches
BF:37%/25.%/19%
Progress: 85%
Location: Ontario Canada
Question Cooked Cheese ??? What is this?

Good Morning - I feel silly (what else is new?)

I gave in and took a 1 month subscription to the web site, so now I have access to meal plans and recipes. However the web site is still not the greatest and there seems to be nowhere to ask for help (maybe on a second look I will find a place to click but I am not the most patient person...)

So on my personalized plan I have in several places an item simply described as cooked cheese Maybe this is a European Term? I am unfamiliar with it, does he mean a cheese like cottage cheese (a lowfat curdy type cheese with a creamy type liquid or in a dry lumpy format similar to ricotta?) can you tell I'm not a big fan of cottage cheese?

I am really hoping cooked cheese is maybe something yummy like brie, camembert or dare I hope - gorgonzolla but I have a feeling you are going to break my heart when you answer this
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  #2   ^
Old Fri, Mar-07-03, 10:00
Spang Spang is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 145
 
Plan: New Glucose Revolution (ex Montignacer!)
Stats: 155/125/120
BF:
Progress: 86%
Default

Sorry - I have no idea!

I'll try searching aorunf when I get a few spare secs!

Spang
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  #3   ^
Old Fri, Mar-07-03, 10:14
KoKo's Avatar
KoKo KoKo is offline
Stepford Malfunction
Posts: 25,926
 
Plan: FatFlush inspired
Stats: 143.5/132/130 Female 62.5 inches
BF:37%/25.%/19%
Progress: 85%
Location: Ontario Canada
Default Spang this is what I've got so far

Quote:
Cheese is, as we all know, is a fermented milk product made from the curds produced when milk is coagulated. Usually it is made from cow's milk but there are many varieties made from sheep's milk and goat's milk. Cheese can also be made from the milk of various other animals.

The basic principle involved in making all natural cheese is to coagulate or curdle the milk so that it forms into curds and whey. As anyone knows who has left milk un-refrigerated for a period, milk will curdle quite naturally. The milk sours and forms into an acid curd.

Today's methods help the curdling process by the addition of a starter (a bacterial culture which produces lactic acid) and rennet the coagulating enzyme which speeds the separation of liquids (whey) and solids (curds).

There are two basic categories of starter cultures. Mesophilic starter cultures have microbes that can not survive at high temperatures and thrive at room temperatures. Examples of cheeses made with these bacteria are Cheddar and Gouda. Thermophilic starter cultures are heat-loving bacteria. They are used when the curd is cooked to as high as 132oF. Examples of cheeses made from these bacteria are Swiss and Italian cheeses.

The definition of an "uncooked cheese" is one where the milk or curds are never heated beyond 37C

Curds are then pressed and moulded, stored or aged.

So essentially cooked cheese would include the cottage cheeses, Swiss and Italian cheeses that are either using the Thermophilic starter or use high heat in the process. Ricotta
for example actually means "re-cooked".


Rustspot replied to my question on the lowcarb forum, but I'm still a bit unsure of exactly which Swiss and Italian cheeses those would be?????? I don't even know why montignac would make such a differentiation (is that a word!!!) I would think specifiying a fat level would suffice
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  #4   ^
Old Fri, Mar-07-03, 10:43
KoKo's Avatar
KoKo KoKo is offline
Stepford Malfunction
Posts: 25,926
 
Plan: FatFlush inspired
Stats: 143.5/132/130 Female 62.5 inches
BF:37%/25.%/19%
Progress: 85%
Location: Ontario Canada
Talking Spang I've got too much free time

Hi spang I should've just done a search in the first place but I really thought it was a translation problem,


Yes, Rustpots answer was what I needed to get on the right track, a search for coked cheese also provided some results the cheeses below are cooked and the link below those leads to a whole lot more. Not that anybody else probably needs to know this, but you never know - maybe one day you will be playing trivial pursuit, or a contenstant on who wants to be a millionaire and you will be thankful for this knowledge



Crotonese ,Provolone ,Fontina, Asiago


http://www.wisc.edu/foodsci/store/cheese.html
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  #5   ^
Old Fri, Mar-07-03, 13:09
KoKo's Avatar
KoKo KoKo is offline
Stepford Malfunction
Posts: 25,926
 
Plan: FatFlush inspired
Stats: 143.5/132/130 Female 62.5 inches
BF:37%/25.%/19%
Progress: 85%
Location: Ontario Canada
Default

Thanks again to Rustpot for adding to the list

Quote:
You can add to you list of cooked cheeses:

Emmental
Gruyere
Parmigiano
yellow wax gouda (aged)

Essentially these are hard cheeses and can be grated.

Cheddar cheeses are on the borderline some are harder than others as the process goes over the 37C heating definition
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  #6   ^
Old Fri, Mar-07-03, 15:33
Spang Spang is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 145
 
Plan: New Glucose Revolution (ex Montignacer!)
Stats: 155/125/120
BF:
Progress: 86%
Default

wow - who'd have thunk it!

cool!
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  #7   ^
Old Mon, Mar-10-03, 06:08
crystalite's Avatar
crystalite crystalite is offline
New Member
Posts: 7
 
Plan: Montignac (was Atkins before)
Stats: 230/219/150
BF:
Progress: 14%
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Default About cooked cheese...

Koko,

Could it be that "cooked cheese" means cheese that are made with pasteurized milk? Some cheese (like goat cheese I think) are made with raw milk therefore uncooked? I'd like to know the answer to that one too...

Another food (very yummy) for thought

Christine
in Montreal
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  #8   ^
Old Tue, Mar-11-03, 00:23
Spang Spang is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 145
 
Plan: New Glucose Revolution (ex Montignacer!)
Stats: 155/125/120
BF:
Progress: 86%
Default oh no!

does that mean that mozzarella is bad ?
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  #9   ^
Old Tue, Mar-11-03, 12:54
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CalicoCat CalicoCat is offline
Senior Member
Posts: 1,363
 
Plan: Protein Power
Stats: 168/163/128 Female 5'1.5''
BF:44%/44%/22-28%
Progress: 13%
Location: Canada, Montréal
Default

So, I am not the only one with a problem with “Cooked cheese”. I tried to ask by clicking on the “Conseils en nutrition” link on the Montignac Web site but the link goes to the FAQ section. I e-mailed the technical service on my first day and never received an answer so I am not really surprised. I only notice if it’s a 0% fat cheese or not. If it’s not, I have any cheese I want since all the cheeses I eat are less than 40% fat (most are around 12%). Anyway, I only had cooked cheese on my menu for the first two weeks. For the last two weeks, they wrote: Gouda, gruyere, brie, mimolette (I don’t know the last one) and sometimes only cheese. But they say, at the end, that the word cheese alone means any cheese that has 40% fat or less.

CalicoCat
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  #10   ^
Old Tue, Mar-11-03, 13:20
KoKo's Avatar
KoKo KoKo is offline
Stepford Malfunction
Posts: 25,926
 
Plan: FatFlush inspired
Stats: 143.5/132/130 Female 62.5 inches
BF:37%/25.%/19%
Progress: 85%
Location: Ontario Canada
Default

Darn this Cheese Issue!!!!

Spang - I think you are ok with mozzarella if you are having a lunch or dinner with very low GI. The Montignac Eat Yourself Slim has mozzerlla as an acceptable item on the chart for this type of meal on page 90. If you have different edition, you can look on whatever charts of meal examples it has. but its definitley ok under those circumstances.

Calico Cat - Isn't it frustrating to have paid for details and get such a vague description. I have emailed and still have no reply I am going to try again for my second week of menus but so far the little secretary keeps informing me they are not ready. I am ready to commit a virtual strangulation I think.

Another thing I find is in the first weeks menu's I think anyone would lose weight if they followed exactly it's almost a vegetarian diet, very little animal protein per day. That's not a problem for me, but for some reason I was under the impression there was more protein involved. So different from Atkins in this way for sure -
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  #11   ^
Old Wed, Aug-18-04, 20:09
gingeris gingeris is offline
New Member
Posts: 2
 
Plan: south beach
Stats: 140/100/90 Male 6'0"
BF:
Progress:
Default cooked cheese

Ricotta means re-cooked
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  #12   ^
Old Sat, Feb-11-12, 11:48
Graceeh Graceeh is offline
New Member
Posts: 1
 
Plan: Zone
Stats: 192/192/180 Female 63"
BF:
Progress:
Default Cooked Cheese

Try searching under "cook cheese" or koch kase" (German) It's a delicious cheese and very easy to make. Here's a recipe...

Koch Kase

INGREDIENTS
1 lb or 500g cottage cheese, compressed dry curd
1 cup creamed cottage cheese, small curd
1 1/2 tsp baking soda
1 teaspoon sea salt (not iodized)
2 tablespoons caraway seed

DIRECTIONS
Place cottage cheeses in a mixing bowl. Sprinkle baking soda over and incorporate it all together just until it's all mixed together, using the slowest speed on your mixer.

Place in a 3 or 4-quart stainless steel saucepot. Let sit at room temperature for 2 to 24 hours.

Put on low heat, add the salt and stir constantly until all is dissolved and mixture is smooth. Stir in caraway seeds. Remove from heat.

Stir occasionally. Place into containers. Let cool completely.
Serve on buttered sourdough rye toast. oh Yum!


Store refrigerated. Keeps 2-3 weeks and gets better every day.
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