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  #1   ^
Old Wed, Nov-30-16, 11:11
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
To Good Health!
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Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
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Default The Case Against Sugar by Gary Taubes

Gary Taubes new book will not be released until December 27th, but are starting to see some pre-publication promotion.

Basics on his blog. http://garytaubes.com/works/books/t...nst-sugar-2016/

Interview with Gretchen Rubin, a committed LC fan after her "Lightening Bolt Moment" reading Why We Get Fat.
http://gretchenrubin.com/happiness_...-against-sugar/
The free .pdf download she offers is a 23 page interview transcript!

Musings on the concept of vindication (or not ) in NY Magazine.
http://nymag.com/vindicated/2016/11...ic-shaming.html

Interviews at DietDoctor https://www.dietdoctor.com/new-book...ubes-case-sugar

Early reviews on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Case-Against...s/dp/0307701646

Last edited by JEY100 : Wed, Nov-30-16 at 11:23.
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  #2   ^
Old Wed, Nov-30-16, 12:00
bostonkarl's Avatar
bostonkarl bostonkarl is offline
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Plan: Atkins - Modified
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Thanks for the heads up. Some good over-the-holidays reading.
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  #3   ^
Old Wed, Nov-30-16, 14:26
cotonpal's Avatar
cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Thanks for the links Janet. The interview by Gretchen Rubin is great, comprehensive. She gives Taubes the opportunity to really explain things.

Taubes' article on vindication is also really interesting. I've often wondered how he and others who buck the system and get demonized for it, tolerate the abuse they receive.

Jean
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  #4   ^
Old Thu, Dec-01-16, 06:22
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Awesome stuff, Janet. Thanks!
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  #5   ^
Old Thu, Dec-01-16, 06:25
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
sugar is the tobacco of the new millennium


From the Amazon page. I think that is easy to remember... and hard to forget.
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  #6   ^
Old Sat, Dec-03-16, 18:43
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phoenix31 phoenix31 is offline
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I'm looking forward to reading this book.
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  #7   ^
Old Sat, Dec-03-16, 23:24
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GRB5111 GRB5111 is online now
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Looking forward to another Taubes book. This one had to be written. Dr. Robert Lustig has been methodically vilifying sugar for a while, so it's nice to see some additional information on the horizon.
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  #8   ^
Old Sat, Dec-10-16, 08:11
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
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Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
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Default Is Sugar Killing Us?

Today's Wall Street Journal has a article written by Gary Taubes, "Is Sugar Killing Us" in the Review Section. Of course, in the Off-Duty section tucked behind it, the cover article and half page photo was on Linzer Cookies.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/is-suga...g-us-1481303447


Quote:
Is Sugar Killing Us?
Experts warn that it may have an outsize role in causing obesity and diabetes—thus increasing the risk of chronic illnesses such as heart disease

By GARY TAUBES
Dec. 9, 2016 12:10 p.m. ET

At the risk of being a Grinch, the Christmas season is a pretty good time to consider the possibility that sugar is killing us. It is yet another holiday in which sweets play a primary role, with candy canes dangling on trees, cookies or Coca-Cola set aside for Santa and visions of sugar plums (which are not fruit but hard candies) dancing in children’s heads.

Many argue that sugar in moderation is benign, but that assumption has been up for debate for as long as we have added sugar to our diets. Anti-sugar forces (myself included) continue to warn that sugar—both the crystalline variety that we put in our coffee and high-fructose corn syrup—may be a fundamental cause of disease, particularly a condition known as insulin resistance. If we are right, sugar has a uniquely powerful role in causing obesity and diabetes—and thus increases our risk of developing the major chronic illnesses, such as heart disease, associated with these conditions.

This debate is not new. Western sugar consumption surged in the mid-19th century with the growth of the candy, chocolate and ice-cream industries. Soft drinks were added to the mix in the 1880s—first root beer, then Dr Pepper, then Coca-Cola and Pepsi. By the 1920s, as Prohibition spurred the nation to turn from alcohol to sugar, yearly sugar sales in the U.S. passed 100 pounds per capita for the first time.


Physicians began to condemn sugar for many illnesses, including rheumatism, gallstones, jaundice and cancer. They noted that diabetes—virtually nonexistent in hospital inpatient and mortality records through the 1850s—had become much more common since the Civil War. In 1924, New York City’s health commissioner, Haven Emerson, argued that sugar consumption was the culprit; skeptics blamed the epidemic on gluttony and sloth.

The sweetening of our national diet accelerated when inexpensive home refrigerators made their debut in the 1930s, letting Americans consume cold soft drinks in quantity at home. With the invention of frozen concentrates after World War II, fruit juices became a staple of American breakfasts.

Breakfast cereals were originally created as a health food to help digestion, and the industry’s early nutritionists were firmly anti-sugar. But once one manufacturer opted for profit over health—Post with Sugar Crisp in the late 1940s—the realities of competition soon won out. By the 1960s, children’s breakfasts had been transformed into lower-fat versions of dessert, and Saturday-morning television shows were dedicated to selling sugary cereals to children.

The final ingredient in the sweetening of our national diet arrived in the 1970s: high-fructose corn syrup, a variation on the chemical components of sugar. By 1999, annual sales of these sweeteners had soared to more than 150 pounds per person, coinciding with a corresponding surge in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes.

The sugar industry has long defended itself against the notion that sugar is uniquely fattening by repeating the mantra that a calorie is a calorie. The worst that can be said of sugar, the industry argues, is that it tastes good, which leads us to consume too much of it. “There is no difference between the calories that come from sugar or steak or grapefruit or ice cream,” proclaimed industry ads in the 1950s.

That is not actually true, though nutritionists have been slow to come around. Beginning in the 1960s, researchers led by the British nutritionist John Yudkin began to publish the results of experiments in animals and trials in humans suggesting that sugar’s distinctive chemistry had a role in producing an entire cluster of biochemical abnormalities known today as “metabolic syndrome.”


Among these abnormalities is resistance to the hormone insulin, which orchestrates the body’s use of fuels—proteins, carbohydrates and fats, and whether we store them or burn them. That key function apparently goes awry when we consume too much sugar and our cells resist the hormone. Insulin resistance is also the fundamental defect in Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease, and it is common in obesity as well.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that some 75 million Americans now suffer from metabolic syndrome. If sugar consumption is the trigger, as 50 years of research suggests, then it might be as much of a direct cause of diabetes as smoking cigarettes is of lung cancer. Without sugar in our diets, diabetes might be an exceedingly rare disease—as it appears once to have been.

When Yudkin and others suggested as much in the 1970s, the consensus opinion among nutritionists and physicians was that dietary fat was the primary dietary evil; they considered sugar relatively benign. We have been living with the consequences ever since.

As the sugar industry is quick to point out, the evidence for the hypothesized chain of cause and unfortunate effects—eat sugar, become insulin-resistant, fatter and diabetic and then die prematurely—is ambiguous. It will probably stay that way. The National Institutes of Health have never seen the need for the expensive clinical trials that would be needed for a rigorous study of the issue.

Indeed, who could doubt the outcome of research that would ask tens of thousands of Americans to avoid sugar and compare them to tens of thousands of others enjoying a diet of Froot Loops, cupcakes and sugary beverages? Not even sugar-industry executives would be surprised to find that the sugar-avoiders were healthier. If nothing else, though, wouldn’t it be nice to know for sure that a lifetime without cakes and cookies is worth the trade-off?

The CDC estimates that obesity and diabetes now cost the U.S. health-care system some $1 billion a day. Spending a single day’s worth of that financial burden to find out whether we are really killing ourselves prematurely with sugar, even when consumed in moderate amounts, would not be a hard expense to justify.

—Mr. Taubes is the co-founder and senior scientific adviser of the Nutrition Science Initiative and the author of “The Case Against Sugar,” out Dec. 27 from Knopf.



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  #9   ^
Old Sat, Dec-10-16, 08:36
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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My only regret about preordering it is the date it will show up... 12/27. Why not Christmas EVE?
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  #10   ^
Old Tue, Dec-13-16, 10:59
Nancy LC's Avatar
Nancy LC Nancy LC is offline
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  #11   ^
Old Tue, Dec-13-16, 12:05
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JEY100
From quoted article:

By the 1920s, as Prohibition spurred the nation to turn from alcohol to sugar, yearly sugar sales in the U.S. passed 100 pounds per capita for the first time.


I had never considered that before, but it makes sense.

Just goes to show that the more "moralists" try to keep people from anything remotely mood-altering, the more actual damage they can cause.

I agree that the toll taken by alcoholism is staggering; but then again, as long as we continue to see such behavior as caused by the drug, rather than a symptom of how people are trying to self-medicate, we will continue to do all the wrong things.

For example, it is a death penalty offense in North Korea to watch television programs from outside the country; and yet, people there still do so. Punishment, as any of us on a restricted diet can attest, is a very short term consideration.

I used candy, pizza, and ice cream to self-medicate during a very stressful time in my life. It was dangerous (I had an eating disorder) and would have had long term health consequences had it continued.

Yet if we banned such things, I have no doubt there would be a black market in it
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  #12   ^
Old Thu, Dec-15-16, 13:29
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is online now
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In addition to The Atlantic, DietDoctor posted a link to Men's Journal. Interesting background on NuSi experiments and changes.
http://www.mensjournal.com/features...g-sugar-w455184
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  #13   ^
Old Thu, Dec-15-16, 21:49
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is online now
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Pretty raw article about Taubes in Men's Journal. It's obvious that the nutritional debate has a long way to go, and he's indicating burn out on some of these fronts. The NuSi story is raw as well, and it doesn't surprise me regarding Hall's findings and associated disputes. Attia seemed to have the potential for calling BS from a technical level, but I'm suspicious that the real story regarding Attia's departure will only be ever known by 2 or 3 people.
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  #14   ^
Old Fri, Dec-16-16, 05:30
jaywood jaywood is offline
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NuSi was never going to work. They had ideals that were almost impossible to stick to. I would have loved to see them succeed :-(.

Likewise when you set up that kind of venture, the personalities that are driven to do it, normally are very big personalities and are not the diplomatic sorts. So for them to have fallen out is also unsurprising. Again a shame, but unsurprising.

I spend all day every day, looking at the effects that sugar has on people, and what there diet is doing to them, I work with a workforce who is unable to register there own weight issues, and refuse to believe the obvious in front of them, and refuse to even think of bucking a trend. So continue to preach moderation, and calorie cutting.

Its only a small snap shot, of the medical world, but I find it is highly indicative of the whole sorry mess!

One day I hope to have a billionaire backer that will allow me to conduct high level meaningful research! But until then I hope that the likes of Taubes carries on going .
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  #15   ^
Old Fri, Dec-16-16, 07:29
WereBear's Avatar
WereBear WereBear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaywood
I work with a workforce who is unable to register there own weight issues, and refuse to believe the obvious in front of them, and refuse to even think of bucking a trend.


There was a stretch where I was stopping at a local convenience store for coffee on my way to work. Every morning I would see people with their own ritual; buying lunch and snacks on their way to work. And I remember getting short lunches, and shorter breaks. What that comes down to is either cigs or Sno-Balls.
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