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  #1   ^
Old Fri, Oct-07-16, 05:12
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 9,491
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
Default Big Food Strikes Back.

New York Times Magazine Annual Food Issue will be out this weekend.

Article by Michael Pollan: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...olicy.html?_r=2

Good Highlights post by Dietitians for Professional Integrity:

http://integritydietitians.org/2016...-powerful-ever/



Quote:
New York Times Magazine's annual food issue is out this weekend. Among the many articles (be sure to check out Ted Genoways' insightful piece on the meat industry's transparency fight), is one by Michael Pollan which details how the food industry managed to retain its political grip over Washington over the last eight years, mainly by aggressively lobbying against public health behind the scenes while publicly putting on a charitable and concerned face.

We want to note this is something many (i.e.: Michele Simon, Marion Nestle) have written about extensively over the years. As you read this summary piece, consider that many of these lobbying and trade groups have ties to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (many of them will be at next week's conference, proudly claiming that they are "part of the solution").
...Summary and highlights follow.
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  #2   ^
Old Fri, Oct-07-16, 16:19
GRB5111's Avatar
GRB5111 GRB5111 is offline
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Plan: Ketogenic (LCHFKD)
Stats: 227/186/185 Male 6' 0"
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Progress: 98%
Location: Herndon, VA
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How to form an effective food movement is the real question. It's hard enough to get agreement among the LCHF, Paleo, vegetarians, vegans, WAPF, Zero Carbers, and those many outspoken "food experts" who have diets to sell. Throw in climate change and animal rights, and you have a mess of arguments among those who could be an effective Real Food Movement group. This is the most telling statement in Pollan's article:

Quote:
Surely there is a lesson here for the food movement — a collection of disparate groups that seek change in food and agriculture but don’t always agree with one another on priorities. Under that big tent you will find animal rights activists who argue with sustainable farmers about meat; hunger activists who disagree with public-health advocates seeking to make soda and candy ineligible for food stamps; environmentalists who argue with sustainable cattle ranchers about climate change; and so on. To call this a movement is an act of generosity and hope. But whatever it is, it has been no match for Big Food, at least in Washington.

It's no wonder there is no match for Big Food. Big Food is focused on one thing. It's much easier that way. One thing Big Food will do is to develop products that sell and eliminate those that don't. That's where we have the most influence, but it's a long road, as there are many who are unaware or unwilling to make the decision to no longer buy the unhealthy garbage that is sold by these producers.

Last edited by GRB5111 : Fri, Oct-07-16 at 18:54.
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  #3   ^
Old Fri, Oct-07-16, 16:34
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GreekRibs GreekRibs is offline
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Plan: LCHF
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GRB5111
How to form an effective food movement is the real question. It's hard enough to get agreement among the LCFH, Paleo, vegetarians, vegans, WAPF, Zero Carbers, and those many outspoken "food experts" who have diets to sell. Throw in climate change and animal rights, and you have a mess of arguments among those who could be an effective Real Food Movement group.
It's no wonder there is no match for Big Food. Big Food is focused on one thing () develop products that sell and eliminate those that don't
Boy, is that ever true. On a micro level, a vegetarian just lectured me recently on her opinion that LCHF is very unhealthy and that I should eat a little of everything in moderation. If various healthy eaters can't even agree on some basics around nutrition ... we're hooped.
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  #4   ^
Old Fri, Oct-07-16, 19:55
MickiSue MickiSue is offline
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Plan: Atkins
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This isn't a question of any administration. It goes deep into the heart of who pays our legislators: us, or the lobbyists and the big donors to their campaigns?

As individuals, we may be able to donate $10, $20, maybe even $1000. But when corporations are considered people, any regular person's contributions to the terrible expense that is a campaign is dwarfed by the millions and millions those "people" who have vested interests in the status quo have.

The only real way to effect change is to find ways to set aside what differences the different dietary groups have and to embrace what similarities we have, and come at it from a consumer standpoint.

It took several years of a worldwide boycott of Nestle in the 80's. But they finally got enough bad press for their habit of giving formula to mothers in third world countries, whose milk then dried up and they were losing their babies to weak formula made with contaminated water; they had no source of good water, and no money to replace the "free" formula that was so costly to their babies' lives.

It CAN work if we not only stop buying the processed garbage, but also take a vocal and unified stand against it. I'd love to start by a letter writing campaign and social media blast against the ADA and their nutritionally excellent sponsors, Coca Cola and PepsiCo.
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  #5   ^
Old Sat, Oct-08-16, 04:35
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
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The website above, created by Dietitians with Integrity, is a good one to watch for ways to take to social media. They had already reviewed Pollan's article and they and the Ninjas for Health also were on top of the issue of paying Dietitians for tweeting about the soda tax. http://integritydietitians.org/2016...ola-dietitians/
https://www.dietdoctor.com/coke-pay...-tweet-soda-tax
Check out their home page for areas of advocacy, ways to be involved and news stories of interest.

Rob, I agree that Pollan quote on the all disparate groups is at the heart of why it will be so hard to make headway against Big Foods control. Cannot ever see the vegetarian groups embracing the sustainable farmers.
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  #6   ^
Old Sat, Oct-08-16, 10:33
M Levac M Levac is offline
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Plan: VLC, mostly meat
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Default

Did you guys read my blog post or did we all think of the same thing? Divide and conquer is what's it's all about. Keep them fighting with each other so they can't see what we're doing to everybody. That's the plan and it works. Even I do it, I had a knee jerk reaction to the words "Michael Pollan".

Here's an idea. Instead of pushing a monolithic diet, push a monolithic support, but for all the various diets. No preference in the support itself, no favoritism, no proportionate support. All the support to all diets regardless. After all, everybody pays for this support, but only a few actually benefit. No wonder we all want to take control of this monolithic support to push our own point of view.

See, we can all see the contradictions in the guidelines from all points of view. The meat people don't like the fact that grains are pushed hard. The grain people don't like the fact that veggies are pushed hard. The veggie people don't like the fact that meat is pushed, though not that hard really. What if instead of pushing meat or veggies or grains, none are pushed a priori, but if we choose to go with meat for example, then here's how to do it properly, if veggies here's how, if grains here's how, and so forth. Instead of an agenda, it's an information booth.

The gubermint cannot represent a population when it does not represent the entire population. Anybody wanna bet nothing's gonna change there? OK, so we understand if something's gonna change, we gotta change it ourselves independently of the gubermint. In effect, represent ourselves to ourselves by ourselves. Funny how that works out.

OK, so we got the Official Dietary Guidelines that tell us what to eat. Let's change this to:

The Official Dietary Support Guidelines (ODSG), that establish a standard support protocol independent of dietary choice, yet that acknowledges the specific dietary requirements dependent on dietary choice, and integrate these specifics into both the standard overarching support protocol and specific respective support protocols.

OK, so we got a hospital that's run by some guy who really likes bread and he decides to make this the hospital's official diet. Never mind it's a bit ridiculous, but bear with me. So now instead of doing it alone, he hooks up to the ODSG and gets access to the collective knowledge from all groups that know all about bread. Now there's a patient that wants meat, no problem, the same ODSG provides all the collective knowledge from all groups that know all about meat. This example is specific foods, but it's the same for the various named diets, i.e. Atkins, Ornish, WW, Jenny C, etc. They're all hooked up to the same ODSG and can provide all the information from all groups that know all about any particular diet.

Its like a library. Instead of the Standard American Diet Archive, it's the International Archive of All Diets Past and Present. Well, which library you wanna go to when you wanna learn all about diet?
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  #7   ^
Old Wed, Jun-28-17, 04:03
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
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Default

Long feature article in the CrossFit Journal on on the ungodly amounts of money the Beverage industry spends on advertising, specifically how they defeat "soda taxes"

https://journal.crossfit.com/article/soda-cecil-2017-2

Quote:
Big Soda: Buying Chronic Disease

BY ANDRÉA MARIA CECIL
June 26th, 2017

If there’s one thing the beverage industry has, it’s money.

And an agenda.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2011: The city council for a second time does not vote on the mayor’s proposed tax on sugary drinks. The American Beverage Association (ABA), the trade organization representing the likes of The Coca-Cola Co. and PepsiCo, then gives US$10 million to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Richmond, California, 2012: Shortly after a city council member—a retired chief of cardiology—introduces a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), about a dozen anti-beverage-tax billboards appear in the town of roughly 100,000 people. All of them are paid for by organizations tied to the beverage industry.

Mexico, 2013: About half of the lower Congress’ seats are routinely empty as lawmakers enjoy steakhouse meals paid for by beverage-industry lobbyists. Meanwhile, lawmakers consider a nationwide SSB tax in a country where Coke is used in religious rites.

Berkeley, California, 2014: As the Northern California city is poised to become the first in the nation to pass an SSB tax, ABA-funded groups buy every available advertising space inside the local Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station, at public bus shelters and on buses, urging voters to reject the measure.

The tactics will sound familiar to proponents of SSB taxes and health-warning labels. The ABA—representing America’s non-alcoholic beverage makers—and its members spare no expense when it comes to fighting such measures.

Aside from the $10 million it spent in 2011 in Philadelphia, the beverage industry also spent $2.7 million from January 2012 to June 2013 in Richmond and $2.4 million from January 2014 to January 2015 in Berkeley, according to the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), a consumer-advocacy organization based in Washington, D.C. But because of Philadelphia’s lacking disclosure laws at the time, former city officials believe the industry spent more than just $10 million fighting the sugary-beverage tax.

“The absence of lobbying disclosure laws in Philadelphia during the 2010 legislative cycle makes it difficult, if not impossible to quantify industry’s financial and political influence at that time,” according to a May 2012 CSPI fact sheet titled “Soda Industry Political Spending.”

As for Mexico, it is unknown how much the industry spent there.

Article continues at above link



And many people may have missed yet another bit of craziness out of Washington, since there was so much of it in early June, but the FDA "delayed indefinitely" the changes required by the new nutrition labeling law.
Translation: it ain't never goin' happen. Big food lobbyists had bought that one with some spare change.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...m=.7cc3a7ba52f1

The food industry lobbyists letter to Price: https://cspinet.org/sites/default/f...nt/NFletter.pdf
(It asks for an extension to 2021, but likely the new label is in the trash already)

Last edited by JEY100 : Wed, Jun-28-17 at 04:23.
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  #8   ^
Old Wed, Jun-28-17, 07:15
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bluesinger bluesinger is offline
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Plan: LCHF
Stats: 000/000/000 Female 62 inches
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Just because they call you paranoid doesn't mean they aren't out to get you.
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  #9   ^
Old Wed, Jun-28-17, 07:31
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Calianna Calianna is offline
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Plan: Atkins-ish (hypoglycemia)
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Working in a grocery store, I'm always shocked at the sheer volume of beverages customers buy.

Oh to be sure, we sell a lot of bottled water, plus a lot of the sodas, energy drinks, and sports drinks are artificially sweetened. Some are even stevia sweetened.

But by and large, most of what the customers are buying is just sugary (mostly HFCS) sweetened beverages - 2 liter bottles of soda, 6 packs of soda, 12 pack cases of sodas, 6 packs and 8 packs of energy drinks and sports drinks, 32 oz bottles of sports drinks, Individual serving boxes, quart bottles, and gallon jugs of kid oriented drinks (Hi C, Hawaiian Punch, etc).

I'm sure part of that is the special deals that are constantly being offered by the manufacturers (buy 2 get one, 3/$10, etc). It seems like a bargain at the time to stock up on them, but there are customers buying huge quantities of those sugary drinks on a weekly basis.

I know one woman who bought some ridiculous number of 2 liter sodas (about 2 dozen bottles) one week when they were on sale, the next week bought an equally ridiculous number of 12 pack cans (at least a dozen), then the next week when 6 pack cans were on sale, bought about 2 dozen of those, and the following week when 8 pack bottles were on sale, another dozen or so of those. I did not get the impression that she was storing them to last the entire summer, otherwise, she would not have continued to buy such quantities of different sizes of the exact same brand and flavors of sodas, so I conclude that somehow, she and her family were drinking all those quickly enough to clear out enough storage room to stock up again each week. After seeing her do this 4 weeks in a row, I have no doubt that if they went through what she bought each week that quickly, the only reason I haven't seen her buy more lately is that she's been shopping at times when I'm not working, still stocking up on loads and loads of sodas.

The reason it was so obvious with her was that she was buying so much each time - but there are customers who buy smaller quantities (for instance, only 4 of the 2 liter bottles at a time, or one 4/$12 deal on the 12 packs), but buy them more frequently. I even have customers buying one or two special deals on sodas, and also buy a single soda from one of the coolers in the same transaction. Our national brand sodas are stocked directly by the company reps - those guys often spend half their day at that one store, restocking their brand of sodas, because they sell sooo much of them.

No wonder the beverage industry has so much money to put into influencing their agenda.
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  #10   ^
Old Wed, Jun-28-17, 07:51
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cotonpal cotonpal is online now
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Plan: very low carb real food
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calianna
Working in a grocery store, I'm always shocked at the sheer volume of beverages customers buy.


On some level people must simply not understand what they are doing to themselves. This is a national health crisis (global health crisis) perpetuated by our government in thrall to the food and beverage industries.

Jean
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  #11   ^
Old Wed, Jun-28-17, 10:18
Bonnie OFS Bonnie OFS is offline
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Plan: Dr. Bernstein
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I stock up on my favorite (only) diet soda when it's on sale. It's the store brand, so when it's on sale it's worth buying a bunch. But never more than what I can drink in about 3-4 months. Somewhere I read that diet soda starts to degrade at about 6 months, so I don't take any chances on wasting it.

Only once did someone ask if I was having a party.
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  #12   ^
Old Wed, Jun-28-17, 14:46
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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I know people who seem to have a sugary beverage welded to their hand at all times. They gotta have their sugar/caffeine jolt on a constant basis.
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