Active Low-Carber Forums
Atkins diet and low carb discussion provided free for information only, not as medical advice.
Home Plans Tips Recipes Tools Stories Studies Products
Active Low-Carber Forums
A sugar-free zone


Welcome to the Active Low-Carber Forums.
Support for Atkins diet, Protein Power, Neanderthin (Paleo Diet), CAD/CALP, Dr. Bernstein Diabetes Solution and any other healthy low-carb diet or plan, all are welcome in our lowcarb community. Forget starvation and fad diets -- join the healthy eating crowd! You may register by clicking here, it's free!

Go Back   Active Low-Carber Forums > Main Low-Carb Diets Forums & Support > Exercise Forums: Active Low-Carbers > Gym Logs
User Name
Password
Register FAQ Members Calendar Mark Forums Read Search Gallery My P.L.A.N. Survey


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   ^
Old Thu, Aug-01-13, 12:02
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 10,133
 
Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 89%
Location: Ontario
Default Teaser's workout journal

This is Teaser's workout log. Feel free to kick sand in my face. But not for long.

pullups (hands-in) bodyweight; 7,7,6 6,6,6, 6,6,6. Between sets I memorize lines of poetry until I feel like doing another set. See what I meant about the sand in the face? Keeps the workout from being boring. Only resting is boring.

standing alternate curls --25 dbx2, 8,7,6,5,4,3
with this I'm doing 8 reps, put the weights down, pretend to do eight reps, weight up, 7 reps, down pretend to do eight reps, weight up, 6 reps etc. Some numbers may be skipped on the way down to three if I fail, and some numbers done twice if they're still easy--when I get to three, that's all I can do.

Bent rows--
Same as alternate curls. The fake reps were a little shorter--both arms moving at one time. So I failed a lot on reps--more like 8,6,4,3,3. Did this with a 105 pound barbell, so pretty light weight. My traps felt really springy afterwards. I'll take that as a good sign. When I was a teenager, there was a greater tendency for springiness in pretty much every muscle after working it. Forget the pump, go for the boing.

I basically have a pull day and a push day for upper body, and a leg day. I used to do three days a week, but lately I've doubled up--two days in a row for each muscle group, so five days rest between, more or less.

I used to do everything to failure, I've backed off from that in favour of volume. So far it seems to be working.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2   ^
Old Fri, Aug-02-13, 14:05
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 10,133
 
Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 89%
Location: Ontario
Default

Sort of my off-day for weight-training.

I usually do a thing where I'll carry two twenty-five pound weights up a staircase, two steps at a time, fast enough to be a little challenging without risking a fall or something, but I consider that more as a sort of sprintish sort of thing. I go up and down ten times, three sessions, fifteen minutes between sessions (I'll watch a forty five minute show, throw in a set every 15 minutes.

So that's what I did today.
Reply With Quote
  #3   ^
Old Tue, Aug-06-13, 12:57
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 10,133
 
Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 89%
Location: Ontario
Default

I work out pretty much every day. Honest.

Just not sure this is a good fit for me for tracking my daily workouts.

But it's nice having the handy link here. Maybe I'll stick exercise-related articles etc. here.
Reply With Quote
  #4   ^
Old Sun, Aug-11-13, 14:04
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 10,133
 
Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 89%
Location: Ontario
Default

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19811949

I'm going through Kindke's blog. Early on, he posts this study about rest intervals and training.

Quote:
Strength increases in upper and lower body are larger with longer inter-set rest intervals in trained men.
de Salles BF, Simão R, Miranda H, Bottaro M, Fontana F, Willardson JM.
Source
Laboratory for Clinical and Experimental Research in Vascular Biology (BioVasc), Biomedical Center, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Abstract
The purpose of the current study was to compare different rest interval durations on upper and lower body strength. Thirty-six recreationally trained men were randomly assigned to 1 min (G1; n=12), 3 min (G3; n=12) or 5 min (G5; n=12) rest interval groups. Each group performed the same resistance training program. Maximal strength was assessed at baseline, mid-point (8 weeks) and post-training (16 weeks) for the bench press and leg press exercises. For the bench press, significant increases were demonstrated within G3 and G5 at 8 weeks and at 16 weeks versus baseline (p<0.05). Additionally, for the bench press, G5 (98.2+/-3.7 kg) was significantly stronger than G1 (92.5+/-3.8 kg) at 16 weeks (p<0.05). For the leg press, significant increases were demonstrated within all groups at 8 weeks and at 16 weeks versus baseline (p<0.05). Additionally, for the leg press, G5 (290.8+/-23.5 kg) was significantly stronger than G1 (251.0+/-15.8 kg) at 8 weeks (p<0.01) and G3 (305.0+/-23.9 kg) and G5 (321.7+/-21.7 kg) were significantly stronger than G1 (276.7+/-10.7 kg) at 16 weeks (p<0.05). The findings of the current study indicate that utilising 3 or 5 min rest intervals between sets may result in significantly greater increases in upper and lower body strength beyond the initial weeks of training versus utilising 1-min rest intervals between sets.


So, more rest, more strength.

Can't see how many sets were done from the abstract.

Contrasted with;


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19966591


Quote:
Chronic effects of different between-set rest durations on muscle strength in nonresistance trained young men.
Gentil P, Bottaro M, Oliveira E, Veloso J, Amorim N, Saiuri A, Wagner DR.
Source
College of Physical Education, University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Brazil College of Health Science, University of Brasilia, Brazil. paulogentil~hotmail.com
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of different between-set rest interval durations on muscle strength after 12 weeks of resistance training. After baseline tests, 34 nonresistance trained college-aged men were matched and randomly assigned to 2 groups. Both groups trained twice a week and performed the same exercises and the same work output with 2 sets of 8 to 12 repetitions until volitional fatigue. One group (n = 18, 21.4 +/- 3.2 yr; 73.8 +/- 14.0 kg; 175.9 +/- 7.8 cm) used short-rest intervals (SR) with a work rest ratio of approximately 1:3; the other (n = 16, 22.4 +/- 2.6 yr; 73.1 +/- 13.6 kg; 171.9 +/- 8.2 cm) used long-rest intervals (LR) with a work rest ratio of approximately 1:6. Leg press and bench press 1 repetition maximum (1RM) were measured at baseline and after the end of the training period. The increases in 1RM for bench press were 14.4 +/- 8.1% for the SR group and 10.5 +/- 6.4% for the LR group (p < 0.05). For the leg press, the increases were 17.5 +/- 9.2% with SR training and 17.8 +/- 12.3% for the LR group (p < 0.05). The results did not reveal significant differences between SR and LR for the bench press or leg press 1RM (p > 0.05). Our data suggest that gains in maximum strength in nontrained men are not dependent on the length of the rest interval between sets. Therefore, personal trainers and strength coaches can advise beginning lifters to use short rest intervals to make best use of their time in the weight room.


Both in Brazil, different universities. A little rivalry?

Short rest intervals.

The last matters considerably. In the first study--maybe five minute rest gets you there faster per set--but if you get 4 sets in instead of 2, in the same time, you're ahead of the game. Who knows?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19691365


Quote:
Rest interval between sets in strength training.
de Salles BF, Simão R, Miranda F, Novaes Jda S, Lemos A, Willardson JM.
Source
Laboratory for Clinical and Experimental Research in Vascular Biology (BioVasc), Biomedical Center, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Abstract
Strength training has become one of the most popular physical activities for increasing characteristics such as absolute muscular strength, endurance, hypertrophy and muscular power. For efficient, safe and effective training, it is of utmost importance to understand the interaction among training variables, which might include the intensity, number of sets, rest interval between sets, exercise modality and velocity of muscle action. Research has indicated that the rest interval between sets is an important variable that affects both acute responses and chronic adaptations to resistance exercise programmes. The purpose of this review is to analyse and discuss the rest interval between sets for targeting specific training outcomes (e.g. absolute muscular strength, endurance, hypertrophy and muscular power). The Scielo, Science Citation Index, National Library of Medicine, MEDLINE, Scopus, Sport Discus and CINAHL databases were used to locate previous original scientific investigations. The 35 studies reviewed examined both acute responses and chronic adaptations, with rest interval length as the experimental variable. In terms of acute responses, a key finding was that when training with loads between 50% and 90% of one repetition maximum, 3-5 minutes' rest between sets allowed for greater repetitions over multiple sets. Furthermore, in terms of chronic adaptations, resting 3-5 minutes between sets produced greater increases in absolute strength, due to higher intensities and volumes of training. Similarly, higher levels of muscular power were demonstrated over multiple sets with 3 or 5 minutes versus 1 minute of rest between sets. Conversely, some experiments have demonstrated that when testing maximal strength, 1-minute rest intervals might be sufficient between repeated attempts; however, from a psychological and physiological standpoint, the inclusion of 3- to 5-minute rest intervals might be safer and more reliable. When the training goal is muscular hypertrophy, the combination of moderate-intensity sets with short rest intervals of 30-60 seconds might be most effective due to greater acute levels of growth hormone during such workouts. Finally, the research on rest interval length in relation to chronic muscular endurance adaptations is less clear. Training with short rest intervals (e.g. 20 seconds to 1 minute) resulted in higher repetition velocities during repeated submaximal muscle actions and also greater total torque during a high-intensity cycle test. Both of these findings indirectly demonstrated the benefits of utilizing short rest intervals for gains in muscular endurance. In summary, the rest interval between sets is an important variable that should receive more attention in resistance exercise prescription. When prescribed appropriately with other important prescriptive variables (i.e. volume and intensity), the amount of rest between sets can influence the efficiency, safety and ultimate effectiveness of a strength training programme.


Yet another abstract.

Quote:
In terms of acute responses, a key finding was that when training with loads between 50% and 90% of one repetition maximum, 3-5 minutes' rest between sets allowed for greater repetitions over multiple sets. Furthermore, in terms of chronic adaptations, resting 3-5 minutes between sets produced greater increases in absolute strength, due to higher intensities and volumes of training.


Okay, so by this logic you get more work done over a greater amount of time, with lots of rest... so not necessarily more efficient. Just more work.


Quote:
When the training goal is muscular hypertrophy, the combination of moderate-intensity sets with short rest intervals of 30-60 seconds might be most effective due to greater acute levels of growth hormone during such workouts.


Quote:
Started trying a new method of training recently that seems to be getting surprisingly good results. The method is to use a resistence that is about 50% of your 1RM, perform 10 reps at a nice and controlled pace of about 2 seconds up, 2 seconds down, then rest for only about 30 seconds between sets.

Repeat this until you come to failure but adjust the weight if you cant do atleast 5 sets.

Ideally you should come to failure after 5 sets at around 55-65 reps in total. At this point stop, and move onto the next exercise.

This method of training is interesting to me becuase the short rest periods means you keep the intensity and focus on your training high, rather than waiting 3-5 mins between sets and day dreaming. Its also very effecient you can do a whole body workout in a short amount of time and avoids being seen as a machine hogger at the gym. My gym gets so overcrowded all the time so this fast training fits in with it.



http://kindkehealthnotes.blogspot.c...&max-results=50

Forgot I ever read this. I guess that's where I got it from. I don't worry about pacing, other than to bring the weight up as quickly as I can (not by cheating though) and control the descent.
Reply With Quote
  #5   ^
Old Tue, Oct-15-13, 17:02
teaser's Avatar
teaser teaser is online now
Senior Member
Posts: 10,133
 
Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
BF:
Progress: 89%
Location: Ontario
Default

woot. woot woot.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:19.


Copyright © 2000-2017 Active Low-Carber Forums @ forum.lowcarber.org
Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.