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  #1   ^
Old Tue, Jul-22-08, 07:17
Aeon's Avatar
Aeon Aeon is offline
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Default CDC Report: State-Specific Prevalence of Obesity Among Adults

From this week's edition of the U.S. Center for Disease Control's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report:

State-Specific Prevalence of Obesity Among Adults --- United States, 2007

July 18, 2008 / 57(28);765-768

Obesity is associated with reduced quality of life, development of serious chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes, increased medical care costs, and premature death (1,2). A Healthy People 2010 objective is to reduce to 15% the proportion of adults who are obese (3). In 2005, no state met this target, and (based on self-reported height and weight) 23.9% of adults in the United States were obese (4). To update 2005 estimates of the prevalence of obesity in adults, CDC analyzed data from the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey. The results of that analysis indicated that 25.6% of respondents overall in 2007 were obese; the prevalence of obesity among adults remained above 15% in all states and was above 30% in Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee. Enhanced collaborative efforts among national, state, and community groups are needed to establish, evaluate, and sustain effective programs and policies to reduce the prevalence of obesity in the United States.

BRFSS is an ongoing, state-based, random-digit--dialed telephone survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population aged >18 years. Survey data are used to monitor progress in achieving health objectives at the state level and in selected metropolitan statistical areas.* Data are weighted to the respondents' probabilities of being selected and to the age-, race-, and sex-specific populations from each state's annually adjusted census. In the 2007 BRFSS survey, Council of American Survey and Research Organizations (CASRO) response rates† among states ranged from 26.9% to 65.4% (median: 50.6%), and cooperation rates§ ranged from 49.6% to 84.6% (median: 72.1%).

Body mass index (BMI) (weight [kg] / height [m]2) was calculated from self-reported weight and height at the time of the survey. Obesity was defined as a BMI >30.0. (1). To maintain consistency with previous analyses (4,5), respondents with self-reported weight >500 pounds or height >7 feet were excluded.

In the 2007 BRFSS survey, 25.6% of respondents overall were obese. Obesity prevalence was 26.4% for men and 24.8% for women (Table). By age group, obesity prevalence ranged from 19.1% for men and women aged 18--29 years to 31.7% and 30.2%, respectively, for men and women aged 50--59 years. By race/ethnicity and sex, obesity prevalence was highest for non-Hispanic black women (39.0%) followed by non-Hispanic black men (32.1%).

By education level, for men, obesity prevalence was lowest among college graduates (22.1%) and highest among those with some college (29.5%) and a high school diploma (29.1%). For women, obesity prevalence was lowest among college graduates (17.9%) and highest among those with less than a high school diploma (32.6%).

By region, the prevalence of obesity was higher in the South (27.3%) and Midwest (26.5%) and lower in the Northeast (24.4%) and West (23.1%) (Table). State-specific obesity prevalence ranged from 18.7% to 32.0% and was <20% in only one state: Colorado (18.7%) (Figure). Obesity prevalence was >30% in three states: Alabama (30.3%), Mississippi (32.0%), and Tennessee (30.1%). No state met the Healthy People 2010 target of 15%, and 30 states had obesity prevalence >25%.




Although U.S. Government publications are in the public domain, I have refrained from posting the whole report out of consideration for members of the Low-Carber forums.

The rest of the report can be accessed (along with references, table and map) at the link provided at the top of my post.
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  #2   ^
Old Tue, Jul-22-08, 07:37
anyway...'s Avatar
anyway... anyway... is offline
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Plan: '72 Atkins ROCKS! :D
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I still swear the people in FL are lying about their weights. 20-24%... yeeeah, I'm buying that.
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  #3   ^
Old Sat, Sep-02-17, 06:53
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JEY100 JEY100 is offline
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Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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Advanced search for CDC report came up with this 2008 post.
Here is same report for 2016 issued Aug 31st.

https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/prevalence-maps.html

(Link has the usual maps by states)

Quote:
Obesity Prevalence in 2016 by Education and Age

Obesity decreased by level of education. Adults without a high school degree or equivalent had the highest self-reported obesity (35.5%), followed by high school graduates (32.3%), adults with some college (31.0%) and college graduates (22.2%).

Young adults were half as likely to have obesity as middle-aged adults. Adults aged 18-24 had the lowest self-reported obesity (17.3%) compared to adults aged 45-54 years who had the highest prevalence (35.1%).

Obesity Prevalence in 2016 Varies Across States and Territories

All states had more than 20% of adults with obesity.

20% to less than 25% of adults had obesity in 3 states (Colorado, Hawaii, and Massachusetts) and the District of Columbia.

25% to less than 30% of adults had obesity in 22 states and Guam.

30% to less than 35% of adults had obesity in 20 states, Puerto Rico, and Virgin Islands.

35% or more adults had obesity in 5 states (Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and West Virginia).

The South had the highest prevalence of obesity (32.0%), followed by the Midwest (31.4%), the Northeast (26.9%), and the West (26.0%).
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  #4   ^
Old Sat, Sep-02-17, 13:03
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inflammabl inflammabl is offline
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Plan: Atkins
Stats: 296/220/205 Male 71 inches
BF:25%?
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Location: Upstate South Carolina
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So taking this report literally.... If men want to be thinner, they should not finish high school, certainly not graduate high school and never go to college unless they are absolutely certain they will graduate. Women on the other hand, should certainly finish high school, take some college or better complete college. Also, no one should ever turn 50 and if you do, make sure you turn 70.

Seriously though, it has little or nothing to do with sex, educational level, race, age or whatever. The best interpretation, I've seen, of the data is "Don't eat sugar and if you do, please stop."
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  #5   ^
Old Sat, Sep-02-17, 18:41
Zei Zei is offline
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Plan: Carb reduction in general
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Well, the statistics provided line up with my expectation you wouldn't expect to see as much visible metabolic damage (obesity) in younger people as ones who've been around accruing damage a few decades longer. Just wait long enough and those young people will find their share of middle-age spread, too, if things don't change. Gary Taubes pointed out that low-quality carbohydrates are the cheapest food, so guess what people with a tiny food budget can afford? Less education, lower paying jobs, less money for food. Higher rates of poverty may explain greater obesity in the southern U.S. for this reason. Healthy foods like meat and veggies aren't cheap, but obesogenic refined carbs (both the sugars and the starches that digest into them) are.
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  #6   ^
Old Mon, Sep-04-17, 08:54
JEY100's Avatar
JEY100 JEY100 is offline
To Good Health!
Posts: 9,491
 
Plan: IF Fung/LC Westman/Primal
Stats: 222/171/169 Female 5' 9"
BF:45%/25.3%/24%
Progress: 96%
Location: NC
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DietDoctor adds the coverage from five media outlets.

Some of them brush aside the inconvenient data that one in three adults is "beyond overweight" (a new kinder name for obese in headline?) to note that a number of states are "stabilizing" in obesity growth.

From Chicago Tribune: "While a third of American adults and one in six children are obese, a report Thursday suggests the rate of increase could be stabilizing in some states."

https://www.dietdoctor.com/us-obesi...s-new-time-high

Quote:
The US obesity epidemic reached a new all-time high in 2016, according to new CDC data. Every single state has an obesity rate greater than 20%, and in five states it’s even greater than 35%. Topping the chart? West Virginia, at 37,7%

To reverse this trend, something new needs to be done. Perhaps we should start by reversing the carb-heavy dietary guidelines that may be contributing to the obesity epidemic.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: New CDC data shows US adults still struggling with obesity
The State of Obesity: Adult obesity in the United States
The Washington Times: One in five Americans are obese: CDC data
Chicago Tribune: American obesity report: 1 in 3 adults are beyond overweight
CBC News: Obesity report: One-third of US adults are beyond overweight
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  #7   ^
Old Sat, Sep-09-17, 09:15
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WereBear WereBear is offline
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Plan: Epi-Paleo/IF
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zei
Higher rates of poverty may explain greater obesity in the southern U.S. for this reason. Healthy foods like meat and veggies aren't cheap, but obesogenic refined carbs (both the sugars and the starches that digest into them) are.


It is a carb-worshipping culture. All the meat is breaded, the tea is sugared to maple syrup levels, cornbread or grits appears at every meal, the desserts are so rich they have to serve pickles afterward to keep people from fainting, and everyone drinks "co-cola."

My own experiences with carb craving as a response to stress explains some of it.
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  #8   ^
Old Sat, Sep-09-17, 10:23
Zei Zei is offline
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Posts: 1,219
 
Plan: Carb reduction in general
Stats: 230/213/180 Female 5 ft 9 in
BF:
Progress: 34%
Location: Texas
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Yup. The Hostess Deep Fried Twinkies made it to our grocery store. My DH looked at that and said it's amazing they can take something that bad and make it worse. Oh, and every carbonated soft drink in Texas is a coke, regardless of what the label calls it. At least that was true when I was a kid.
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  #9   ^
Old Sat, Sep-09-17, 11:43
inflammabl's Avatar
inflammabl inflammabl is offline
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Plan: Atkins
Stats: 296/220/205 Male 71 inches
BF:25%?
Progress: 84%
Location: Upstate South Carolina
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Yankee BS.
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  #10   ^
Old Sat, Sep-09-17, 13:30
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teaser teaser is offline
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Plan: ketosis/IF
Stats: 190/158/154 Male 67inches
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What's the world coming to when people are too lazy to deep fry their own twinkies?
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  #11   ^
Old Sun, Sep-10-17, 07:43
PaCarolSue PaCarolSue is offline
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Posts: 300
 
Plan: Whatever Works
Stats: 217/199.5/195 Female 5ft 2 inches
BF:lots/lots/less
Progress: 80%
Location: USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zei
Gary Taubes pointed out that low-quality carbohydrates are the cheapest food, so guess what people with a tiny food budget can afford? Less education, lower paying jobs, less money for food. Higher rates of poverty may explain greater obesity in the southern U.S. for this reason. Healthy foods like meat and veggies aren't cheap, but obesogenic refined carbs (both the sugars and the starches that digest into them) are.



I grew up very poor in the 50s. Lots and lots of starchy carbs at every meal, with an occasional sprinkling of meat mixed in, and a few canned vegetables, ie, one can of green beans divided among a family of 5. Mac and cheese, spaghetti, fried potatoes. No one was fat, however, because there wasn't enough food to make you fat. Different story once we grew up and could afford much more of the crappy food.
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